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ITIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DOTGT 



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MR. 
CITIZENSHIP 

Stars and Stripes 

forever 

SEELAKELIFE1 



APRIL 13-19, 2001 

VIEWPOINT 

Affordable housing 

comes to 

Lake County 

SEEB4 



■ 





Children rush to find the ducky eggs that were worth an Easter basket full of toys and treats during 
the Antioch Park District's annual egg hunt at Williams Park.— Photo by David Krueger 




uctioneer's Nite' benefits St Peter's 



By JULIE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



The ninth annual Auctioneer's 
Nite on April 21 to benefit St Peter 
School in Antioch will have a Hawai- 
ian theme and many weeklong tropi- 
cal trips to support it 

The evening will begin with 
cocktails at 6 p.m. (cash bar) followed 
by a buffet dinner at 7 p.m. and the 
live auction at 8 p.m. The silent 
auction will run throughout the 
evening. Guests can hula to "Celebra- 
tion Sounds," disc jockey provided 
music after the auction. 

The tropical trips being sold at 
auction include a condo in Hawaii, 
Orlando and the Bahamas. A 
weekend in •, Door County is being 
offered for those wanting to stay a 



little closer to home. 

Other items being auctioned 
include .a man's Schwinn bicycle, a 
wine and beer party, a lawn mower, a 
skybox suite at Comisky Park for 16 
people that includes food and drinks, 
tickets to the blue man group, a day 
on the Chain fishing with the assis- 
tance of a fishing pro, a Mario Tricosi 
spa day, Bears tickets, as well as 
tickets to Cubs, Sox and Brewers 

games and more. 

State Rep. Tim Osmond (R- 
Antioch) is donating an opportunity 
for one 9-16-year-old to be a page for 
a day on the floor of the House of 
Representatives in Springfield for the 
auction. This is one of the most 
unusual auction items," said 
Caroline Schartz, one of the event 
'organizers. 




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County's largest 
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FWA garners grant for 

Catherine-Channel work 



By STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter . ; 




*•••«*. 



There will be one raffle during 
the event for one year's tuition to St 
Peter School. Raffle tickets will be 
sold for $10 each. "For those who 
don't have a student at St Peter, a 
cash payout will be awarded," said 
Schartz. 

The buffet menu consists of beef 
brochette, teriyaki chicken, garden 
and fruit salad, vegetables, dinner roll 

and dessert 

Tickets are available at Realty 
World and the State Bank of the 
Lakes prior to the event, as well as at 
the door on Auctioneer's Nite for 

$12.50 per person. 

"We hope this fundraiser will be 
well attended," said Schartz. "It helps 
us give our students access to oppor- 
tunities to prepare them for high 




..... 




1 




townshiD center bids awarded 







By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 




Bids have been received and 
accepted by Antioch Community 
High School. (ACHS) Dist 117 for the 
first phase of construction for the 
second high school in the district and 
the construction of r .the township 

center. 

"All told, we are about $4,000 
under budget," said the district 
business manager Bill Ahlers. 

Lake Villa-Antioch Center is 
being constructed, as cooperative 
between the high school district and 



• a , • 

the townships of Antioch and Lake 
Villa. With the help of State Rep. 
Timothy Osmond (R-Antioch), 
$900,000 of Illinois First money has 
been secured to help. finance the 
project. 

Some of the site work contracts 
are the responsibility of ACHS, arid 
others are pro-rated to the coopera- 
tive. 

Thelen Sand & Gravel will 
provide the earthwork and site utili- 
ties for $444,990/ Of that amount, 
$422,990- is the responsibility of the 
school district. Curran Construction 
Co. will provide the asphalt paving 



.... stobep 

for by the school district 

Seater Construction -Co. will 
provide the carpentry for $479,700 
with $29,270 being paid by ACHS. 
Ridgeview Electric will provide the 
electrical work for $208,000, $43,000 
to paid for by the district. 

Circle Concrete will provide the 
concrete work for $124,790. The high 
school district will pay $37,900 of the* 

touu* 

The difference between the total 
amount and the amount being paid 

Please see BIDS /A6 



The future of Lake Catherine and 
Channel Lake on the north side of the 
Chain O' Lakes appears brighter. 

The Fox Waterway Agency (FWA) 
received a $246,000 grant from the 
Clean Lakes Program as part of a 
$600,000, multi-year improvement 
program, agency officials said. The 
grant will be aided by a transfer of 
almost $600,000 from the Ackerman 
Island fund the agency holds. 

"This was something that was 
encouraged by Director Wayne 
Blake. It was something I worked on 
when I firststarted here in 1997," said 
Ingrid Enriquez, FWA director. 

One of the objectives of the 
study, done by a Springfield 
engineering firm, Cochran & Wilken, 
Inc., is to improve fisheries popula- 
tion' and habitat for improved recre- 
ational opportunities. 

The IEPA funded 60 percent of 

the study with 40 percent from the 

FWA. The study will also be used by 
the Illinois Dept of Natural 
Resources, U.S. Geological Society 
and the Natural Resources Conserva- 
tion Service. 
, FWA Director Wayne Blake is 
pleased with the grant 

"Fifty percent of the grant Is for 
the study. The rest Is for the 
solutions," Blake said. 

A new, customized aeration 
system will be designed, as the old 
one was deemed to be too small, 
Enriquez said. An aquatic plant 
harvester use was recommended. 

The FWA will be responsible for 
oversight of the operation to control 

Eurasian water mil foil. 

"The goal of the lake manage- 
ment plan for Channel Lake and 
Lake Catherine is to address the 
problems,- to protect and enhance 
existing lake uses, to increase recre- 
ational access arid opportunities, 
and to improve overall water quali- 
ty," the report states. 

Objectives include the following 

areas: 

Improve water quality for 
aesthetics, swimming and other 
activities; eradicate invasive exotic 



in 



plant species, particularly Eurasian 
water mil foil; promote and manage 
species diversity, density and 
location of macrophyesl improve 
fisheries population and habitat for 
improved recreational opportunities 
and to implement education 
programs to enhance the public's 
knowledge of lake ecosystems. 

A mil foil program is recom- 
mended for both lakes, with 12; 
weevils to be stocked in Channel 
Lake and 8.000 weevils at Lake 
Catherine. The cost is an estimated 
$25,535. 

The two lakes are hydra ulicaily 
connected, glacial lakes that are 
located in northwestern Lake 
County, near the Wisconsin border. 
They are the two northernmost parts 
of the Chain O* Lakes and also the 

deepest the report states. The two 
lakes are hydraulically connected 
with a shallow sandy ridgej approxi- 
mately 4 to 8 feet in depth. The 
surface area is 337 acres for Channel 
Lake and 150 acres for Lake Cather- 
ine. The entire watershed covers 
12384 acres, with several other lakes 
within 10 miles. Channel Lake has a 
maximum depth of 35 feet, Lake 
Catherine has a maximum depth of 
39 feet 

Public access to the lakes Is avail- 
able through many spots. There is a 
Rte. 173 access channels, semi- 
public access at various subdivisions, 
and two channels for access for boats 
which are smaller than a five-foot 
clearance of the Rte. 173 overpass. 

According to a 1999 study, the 
lakes generate 40,000 visitors a year. 

"If a 20 percent increase in user 
days is realized by implementation of 
the lake restoration program, then 
the projected economic benefit is' 
$3,240,000. It is estimated the 
proposed restoration program will 
generate a total of $8,100,000 in 
economic benefits over a 10-year 
period," the report states. 

Implementation of the program 
could begin as early as this s 
schedule lasts until late 2004. 

Had the program not been 
pursued, there could have been, "a 



Please see FWA IA6 





■ X - • 

Immui^ program canceled 



By JUUE MURPHY 

Staff Reporter 



• • 



■ ■' i 



The Lake County Health Dept 

has canceled its immunization 

program on April 18 at the VFW hall 

in Antioch because the facility is 

being used for another event on that 

date. 

"We want to get the word out 

that this won't be happening this 

month," said Al Himber, assistant 

public relations officer for the VFW. 



* 

"People from around the county 
know we have this here." 

Low cost immunizations are 
generally available through the 
health department on the third 
Wednesday of every month at the 
VFW hall located on North Ave. from 
4-6 p.m. Trie program will resume on 
May 16 and every third Wednesday 

thereafter. 

For, more information, call the 

Lake County Health Dept at 360- 

6761. 






■ 



For main office, call (847) 223-8161; For home delivery, call (847) 245-7500 






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A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



April 13, 2001 





Referendum to ease 




• • * 



Lake County government moved closer to 
a referendum asking residents to pay an addi- 
Uonal one-quarter percent sales tax to fund 
projects designed to ease congestion on coun- 
ty roads when SB0697 passed the State Senate 
by a 43-13 margin. 

The blli, sponsored by State Senators Ade- 
line Geo-Karis, William Peterson and Terry 
Link, would give counties the authority to ask 
residents, via a referendum question, whether 
they would permit a one-quarter percent sales 
tax increase to pay for construction, mainte- 
nance, operation and improvements of coun- 
ty highways. 

Specifically, the bill would add transporta- 
tion to the purposes and uses of the revenue 
from the special county retailers' occupation 
tax for public safety. If levied, the tax may be 
used solely fro transportation or public safety 



but not for both purposes. K 



i 



way tovVards increasing capacity on Lake 



M Our State Senators did a great jot) pushing * * "'Cdiinty Highways, 
this bill through the Senate, and we're confi- M We have outlined over $120 million in 



dent that the same 
will happen in the 
House of Represen- 
tatives," said Lake 
County Board Chair, 
Suzi Schmidt. 

The additional 
one-quarter per- 
cent sales tax 
would raise a pro- 
jected $15-20 mil- 
lion for projects de- 
signed to mitigate traffic congestion in 
Lake County. 

According to County Engineer, Marty 
Buehler, the additional revenue will go a long 



'We have outlined over $120 million 
in projects that would increase 
capacity on county highways! 



Marty Buckler, 
Lake County Engineer 




estion clears Senate 



it is sold (other than alcoholic beverages, soft 
drinks and food prepared for immediate con- 
sumption), prescription and non-prescription 
medicines, drugs, medical appliances and in- 
sulin, urine testing materials, syringes and nee- 
dles used by diabetics. 

* The Lake County Board and State Senators 
Geo-Karis, Peterson and Link are pushing the 
bill after a county sponsored survey of 802 res- 
idents found that over 60 percent would vote in 
favor of authorizing funding to address the traf- 
fic problem in the county. Additionally, a sales 
tax increase was the preferred choice by resi- 
dents when offered the option of a property tax, 
gas tax or sales tax increase. 

The Lake County Board made reducing 
traffic congestion and driving times one of its 
top priorities at its goal setting retreat in Janu- 
ary. 



projects that would in- 
crease capacity on 
county highways, 
which would benefit 
state roads as well since 
our highway system is 
integrated throughout 
the county," Buehler 
said. 

A one-quarter 
percent sales tax in- 
crease would cost resi- 
dents and visitors an additional $0.25 for every 
$ 100 they spend in Lake County. The addition- 
al tax would not be charged on the sale of food 
that is to be consumed off the premises where 




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COMMUNITY 




lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



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■ 



merrier 



By JUUE MURPHY 

Staff Reporter 




i . . 




Matthew, Nicholas and Amanda 
Marra woro bom on Eastor Sunday 
1 1 years ago, April 15, 1990, and this 
year their birthday falls on Master 
again, a special event as the anniver- 
sary of their birth will only coincide 
with Easter a couple of times during 
tholr lifetime. Easter dinner will bo at 
home with mom and dad, Donlso 
and Louis, and throe brothers and 
sisters Rebecca, 9, Melissa, 8, and 
Jooy,5. 

"It's pretty hard to got bored 
around hero with so many brothers 
and sisters," said Matt, with his 
mother nodding her hoad In agree- 
ment. 





Multiply family mombors by 
friends, and tho house really gots full. 
N ! have a lot of best friends," said 
Nick. "I havo like eight or nlno of 
them." Robccca added that her bost 
friends Include Lauren, Mcagan, 
Matty, Katie, Paige, Danny and CAT. 

"It's Interesting that they pick a 
lot of the same friends," said the 
triplet's mother Denlse Marra, one of 
the busiest moms around. "Though 
wo did have a birthday sleepover 
party last weekend with 22 kids • and 
we survived/* 

The triplets love oil sports but es- * 
pcciolly baseball and with three oth- 
er brothers and sisters they can make 
tholr own team for nearly any sport. 

"I'm a great ball player. I'm good 
In centerfleld," said Amanda with 
her mom adding that she hits as well 
as she fields. Melissa chimed in that 
her specialties are swimming and 

Jumping ropoaf^ 



M 

The throo aro planning on ca- 
roors as ball players, and bocomlng 
announcers when they can no longer 
take tho field. Amanda has some ex- 
perience under hor bolt as sho cur- 
rently announcos for hor brothers* 
gamos. 

Tho farmor who has boon grow- 
ing crops, Including corn, on a por- 
tion of tho Marra's six acres Is going 
to mako a baseball diamond on tho 
former fields so tho Marras will havo 
their own "field of dreams." 

Though If necessary, finding 
somo sort of career to fall back on 
shouldn't bo difficult for tho triplets, 
or any of tholr siblings, as all aro 
straight A students (of those receiv- 
ing letter grades), 

Tho birthday bunch attends 
W.C. Potty school as fifth-graders, 
though each is In a different class- 
room. Matt is a student of Kris Bolln, 
Nick of Susan Belnecko and Amanda 
of Llcsa Owens. 

When the Marra children aren't 
at school or participating In some 
sport, they help with chores, keeping 
the house organized and caring for 
the family's 15 pots that include four 
dogs, three pet ducks (Quakers, 
Cheese and baby Ritz Bits), four cats, 
two guinea pigs, one hamster and 
one rabbit. 

"I've always loved kids and pets," 
said Donlso, a fact that would bo 

known without statement given 
thore were years when she had five 
children in diapers and car seats, 

BShe added, "The greatest gift 

parents can give their child is a sib- 
ling." The youngest, Joey, said, M l 
think the bestest present is a hug and 
a kiss." 




Matthew, Nicholas and Amanda Marra were born on Easter and 
will celebrate their 11th birthday on Easter Sunday. The are pic- 
tured with their siblings Melissa (behind). 8, Joey, 5, and Rebec- 
ca, 9, as well as three of the IB family pets: Butkus, Barney and 
Butch.— Photo by Julie Murphy. 



INDEX 










ueens 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



■ 



The official portraits of Miss An- 
tloch 2000, Nikkl Padon and Little 
Miss Antloch 2000 Shannon Cahlll 
will Join tho other former Antloch 
pageant queens In what has becomo 
an Impressive gallery at tho Village* 
Hall of tho beauty and charm found 
In Antloch. 

Tho portraits woro both taken 
and donated by Barry Dowo Photog- 
raphy, and woro accepted by Laurie 
Stahl, director of parka and recre- 
ation as well as tho pageant, at tho 
annual presentation. Dob's Framo 
Shop In Undonhurst donated tho 
frames. 

Stahl said, "We're vory excited 
about the pageant for this year 
because we're doing a scholarship 
pageant. Wo havo $2,000 In schol- 
arship money that will go to the 
winner of this yoar's event. I go. 
the idea from Lake Villa's pageant 
last year." 

Letters went out to Antloch busi- 
nesses seeking donations. Tho vil- 
lage engineering firm Ci ark Dietz do- 
nated $1,000, Raymond Chevrolet & 
Olds donated $500, the Antloch Ir. 
Women's club donated $300 and 
State Bank of The Lakes and First 
National Bank-Employee Owned 
(FNBEO) donated $100 each. Addi- 
tionally, FNBEO is donating $100 to 
the queen's prize package. 





Mist Antloch Nikkl Paden and Little Miss Antloch Shannon Cahlll 
hold their official portraits. 



1 We aro thrilled to bo able to of- 
fer this to our queen this year and be 



Have that it will help some lucky 
young lady fulfill her dreams of col- 
logo, and also attract intelligent and 
goal-oriented young women to our 

Eageant to represent Antloch in tho 
est way possible," said Stahl. 

Tho pageant winner will be able 
to use the money at the college of her 
choice, but will not receive the schol- 
arship until the end of her reign. 
Applications for the 2001 Miss 




and Llttlo Miss pageants are available 
at the parks and recroatlon depart- 
ment office locatod at 806 Kolbok. 
Tho deadline for pageant entry Is 
May 11 at 5 p.m. 

The 2001 pageant will take place 
on June 16 at the Antloch Communi- 
ty High School Auditorium at 6*30 
p.m. 

"We are also excited to be back in 
the newly remodeled auditorium of 

the high school this year," said Stahl. 
"ItwUibeverynlce.' 




By JUUE MURPHY 

Stiff Reporter 



*.■ 



Most churches In the Antloch 
ores aro holding special services for 
Holy weekend. 

The Antloch Free Church locat- 
ed at 750 Highvlow Dr. will have a 
Good Friday service at 7 p.m., and 
Sunday services at 8:15 a.m., 9:30 
a.m. and 11 a.m. 

The Assombly of God Christian 
Life Fellowship will have Sunday 
school for all ages at 9 a.m., worship 
at 10 a.m. and a Sunday evening ser- 
vice at 6:30 p.m. The church is locat- 
ed at 4 1625 N. Deop Lake Rd. 

The First Church of Christ Scien- 
tist's Sunday service will celebrate 
tho resurrection of Christ, and will be 
hold at 10:30 a.m. Tho church Is lo 
cated at the Intersection of Rto. 173 
and Harden St. on the hill. 

Tho Mlilburn Congregational 



United Church of Christ will have a 

Good Friday service at 11 a.m. for 
both children and adults followed by 

lunch. There will be as 





Saturday at 8 p.m. 

A sunrise service will be held at 
6:30 a.m. on Sunday followed by s 
breakfast at 7 a. m. Services with Holy 
Communion will be hold at 630 am 
and 10 a.m. 

MUlburn Congregational United 

Church of Christ Is located on the 
comer of Grass Lake Rd. and Rte. 45. 
St. Peter's Catholic Church, lo- 
cated on Lake St., will havo two ser- 
vices on Good Friday. Tho first be- 
gins at 3 p.m. and Is a liturgy of the 
Lord's passion. The socond service 
Stations of the Cross, will be held at 

730 p.m. 

rday there Is a: 

Easter food blessing at 1 p.m. 

Mass will bo hold on Easter Sun- 
day at 630 a.m. , 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 




10. a.m. In the church. Mass will 

also be held In tho basement at 8:15 
a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11:45 a.m. for 
those not able to And a seat in the 
church. - 

St. Stephen Lutheran Church on 
Hillside Just ofTof Rte. 59 will have a 
730 p.m. Service of Darkness on 
Good Fridty, and a sunrise Easter 
service at 6 a.m. on Sunday. 

The Waukegan Brass Ensemble 
will perform at the services hold at 8 

a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on Sunday. 

The United Methodist Church of 
Antloch, 848 Main St., will have a 
special drama on Good Friday at 7 
p.m. that will combine music and 
drama with dialog of Peter and Judas 

alter the last supper. Rob and Tom 
Weckler aro the directors. 

On Sunday, the sunriso service 
begins with Senior High Youth 
Group at 7 a.m. Worship is at 8:30 
a.m. and 10 a.m. 




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CONNICTID-Look for us on the Internet at WWW.LAKELANDMEDIA.COM 









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Dairy Darn at 25 North 
Ave. Is holding its first an- 
nual Eastor Egg Hunt and 
Fun Fair on April 14 to col- 
lect non-perishable food for tho 
Helping Hands Rcsalb Storo and 
Help Center In Antloch. 

From there, Helping Hands will 
ensure that families In need from 
Lake and McHenry counties as well 
as those from Kenosha County will 

got the food that was donated. 

At the egg hunt, there will bo 
prizes, food and a moon walk to add 

to tho fan. 

Donations of non-perishable 

food Items, money, or non-food 
Items aro both encouraged and ap- 

• ■ B * . 



EllODIIO(IUIItltlllll«IIHMtII(l9lllllMI(tlMIM»lMlMlllllMMI( 




OUR 
TOWN 



Julte Murphy 




1 * 




■ 



Hor friend, Kim Baumelster 
ir had to undergo 

surgery to rcmovo a tumor on her 
knee, and Is unable to return to tho 
shop at this tlmo putting her at risk 
of losing tho store. 



1 >__ 



Schoc 



id 




Form 



Easter Egg Hunt and Fun Fair, call 
either 838-5150 or 830- 1000. 



JOHN PHELPS Hands owner Dronda Butler has 

—BportHM* wnrke<i.dl!lgontly to help fomUlc 

d by things like offering a clc 
Ing exchange, and at Christmas 



gave presents and food baskets to 



i 1 



34 families. 



donated canned and other non- 
perishable food Items to the Lake 
County food pantries 'as their ad- 
mission fee to tho Ag Expo hold at 
tho Lako County Fairgrounds. 

At tho expo students learned a 
little about farming and even more 
about food groups. Additionally 
they learned about pollination and 
the life of on apple tree, and that the 
milk in local grocery stores had 



* 



been milked from a cow 38 hours 
prior. 

Lucky third -grader Trevor Stoin 
was invited to help assemble a soft- 
sculpture pizza as 4-H members ex- 
plained tho food pyramid. 

It sounds like it was a ton trip, 

On a different note, registration 
for tho Antloch Waves Swim Team 
is on April 28 from 10a.m.-2 p.m. at 
the Community Building. 

The season is an eight- week 
prommwlthbetvveenslxi 
dual swim moots and cham 
unships. Moots are held at the Ami 
och Aqua Center and other loca 




. ■ 



Tho team Is Tor children 5-ib 
years old who are able to swim tho 
length of tho pool unassisted. Prac- 
tices aro 5 days a week. 

If you have Interring Injbrma- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for "Gu 

Town " call ttojf reporter w* h 

phyat223'B161>ext600or 

I'mallJmurphyQlakelandmcdta. 

com 




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A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



April 13, 2001 



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Geologist Larry McKenna uses toilet paper as an analogy of the earth's age for 
fourth-grade students at St. Peter School, and points out where on the time line 
dinosaurs lived. 

■ 

■ 

Geologist explains earth's 

timeline with toilet paper 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 



« 



Visiting geologist Larry McKenna, and the 
uncle of student Bobby Schartz, gave fourth- 
grade students at St. Peter School the opportu- 
nity to hold the fossils of real dinosaur vertebrae 
bones as he explained more about them and 
when on the earth's time line dinosaurs reigned. 

"How old is the earth?" McKenna asked, 
and put into a reference the students could un 
derstand. He unrolled a roll of toilet paper and 
asked the class to think of the stream of paper 
as being 4.5 billion inches long to compare it 
with the earth's 4.5 billion years. He answered 
himself and said, "Earth is old enough, almost 
anything can happen." 

McKenna continued, "Science takes what 






we know, makes a few guesses, and finds out 
what we don't know." 

He explained how scientists would deter- 
mine the likely size of a dinosaur from a single 
bone, and had one student roll the bone over 
22 times on the floor to determine the spine 
length. Other students provided the visual 
placement for the head and feet. The class 
agreed the bone probably came from a long- 
necked dinosaur. 

McKenna told the class he took four sci- 
ence and two math classes each year before 
earning his Ph.D. and had spent a total of 22 
years in school. 

. McKenna operates a company called 
Working Knowledge that provides staff devel- 
opment for science teachers from Overland 
Park, Kansas. 






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a 

Students participate in 
Conference Art Festival 






By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 






Antioch Community High School (ACHS) 
will be one of the schools sending students to 
participate in the North Suburban Conference 
Art Festival on April 20 at the Zion-Benton 
Township High School located on 21st Street at 
Kenosha Rd. in Zion. 

The conference, in its seventh year, will 
highlight the artistic growth for students and 
art appreciation for the public. Each partici- 
pating school will display up to 50 pieces of stu- 
dent produced work for viewing. 

"Eight of our most promising students will 
be invited to help set up the show and partici- 
pate in the afternoon workshops," said Cindy 
Howell who teaches upper level drawing and 
painting at ACHS. . 

Workshops will be held for students during 



the day prior to the start of the exhibit. Topics 
include pinhole photography, puppet making, 
a fabric workshop, jewelry making, watercolors 
and making clay gnomes. A group presentation 
and a dinner will follow the workshops for the 
students. 

The public will be invited in to view the ex- 
hibit from 6:30-0:30 p.m. with dueling pianists 
to accompany the visual artwork. Ribbons for 
ten outstanding pieces will be awarded to each 
school at 7:30 p.m. 

Participating schools include Antioch, 
Grant, Lake Forest, Libertyville, Mundeicin, 
North Chicago, Round Lake, Stevenson, Vernon 
Hills, Warren, Wauconda and Zion-Benton. 

Refreshments will be available. 

Admission is free. The school requests that 
visitors enter through the south doors and pro- 
ceed to the field house located in the southeast 
comer of the building. 



WHAT'S NEW AT THE LIBRARY 



NEW CHILDREN'S FICTION 

By KA. Applegate 
Back to Before 
The Diversion 
Elfangor's Secret 
The FiJ i mist Chronicles 
The First Journey 
The Next Passage 
The Resistance 






The Return 
The Ultimate 
Vlsser 






Alice by Accident 
Lynne Retd Banks 

Elite's New Home 

Becky Citra 

Matilda Bone 

Karen Cnshman ■ 

Navajo Summer 

Jennifer (Divings Divey 

Sliver Dollar 
[Catherine Ayres 



PICTURE BOOKS 

Blossom and Boo 

Dawn Apperlcy : 






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Duck In the Truck 

Jez Alborough 

Elliot Bakes a Cake 

Andrea Beck 



Ell lot's Emergency 

Andrea Beck 

* 

Elliot's Shipwreck 

Andrea Beck 

* 

Grandfather Counts 

Andrea Cheng 

How the Cat Swallowed Thunder 

Uoyd Alexander 

I Got So Mad 

Jean Bay 

I'm Not Chasing the Cat Today 

Jessica Harper 

My First Day at Preschool 

Jean Bay 



Never Poke a Squid 

DenysCazel 

No More Mess 

Edna Coe Bercaw 






Roan A Noisy Counting Book 

Pamela Duncan Edivards 

Some Things are Scary 

Florence Parry Heide 

Spllsh, Splash, Springs 

Jan Carr 

TeU Me Again About the 
Night I Was Born 

Jamie Lee Curtis 

■ 

There's No Nest like Home 

Ja mile Clierrington 

* 

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We're Going On a Lion Hunt 

DaveAxtell 

Where is Grandpa? 

TA. Barron 

■ 

Willy's Pictures 

Anthony Browne 



Lakes feegion 

Historical 



P.O. Box 240 • Antioch, IL 60002 





Wanted 

New Members to share in the exciting times ahead. Join us 
in bringing history to our community. Work will soon begin 

on the restoration of the St. Ignatius Church which was 
built in 1862. Other historical projects are being planned. 

**Join Today** Call (847) 395-0899 









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4pr// J3, 2007 



COMMUNITY 



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Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 



POLICE BEAT 



cltargcd with 



ANTIOCH 



Intoxicated pedestrian 

Michael E Rcilly, 41, of 25218 Rte. 173 In 
Antioch, was arrested for pedestrian under 
the influence of alcohol on April 7 at 3:10 p.m. 
on Rte, 173 cast of Tiffany. 

An officer was dispatched to the area on the 
complaint of an intoxicated pedestrian walking 
In the roadway. Police observed Reiily stum- 
bling into the westbound Rte. 1 73 lane of traffic. 

When the officer spoke to Reiily, he de- 
tected the strong odor of alcoholic beverage 
on his breath. Reiily was arrested for pedestri- 
an under the influence of alcohol and trans- 
ported to the Antioch Police DepL 

There he submitted to a breathalyzer test 
resulting in a blood alcohol concentration of 
.15. Reiliy was put through booking proce- 
dures and issued a citation. He was released 
on personal recognizance pending his April 
25 court date. 

Police transported Reiily home. 



Multiple 



Peter A. Schick, 59, of 3324 Old Plank Rd. 
in Park City, 111., was arrested for causing a 
traffic accident, driving while revoked and on 
warrant on April 7 at the intersection of Park 
Ave. and Rte. 83. 

Schick hit another vehicle when attempt- 
ing to turn from Park Ave. onto Rte. 83. 

Police checked his identifiers through 
LEADS/NC1C with information returning that 
Schick's driver's license was revoked, and that 
he had a valid warrant through the Lake 
County Sheriffs Dept. in the amount of 
$15,000. 

He was arrested and transported to the An- 
tioch Police DepL where he was put through 
booking procedures and issued citations for 
failure to yield turning left, operating an unin- 
sured vehicle and driving while revoked. 

Schick was released on personal recog- 
nizance for those charges pending his May 9- 
court date. Police men transported him to the 
Lake County Jail for the warrant • 

DUI/revoked 

driver's license 

Mark M. McClain, 43, of 2 1654 W. Birch in 
Lake Villa, was arrested on April 7 at 12:12 
a.m. on Rte, 83 south of Beach Grove Rd. for 



driving under the influence of alcohol and for 
driving while revoked. 

Police observed a vehicle on westbound 
Rte. 173 with the right side tires over the fog- 
line. The vehicle then turned onto Rte. 83 
without using a turn signal. As police followed 
the car, the vehicle was swerving severely 
within the lane, and then drove over the ccn- 
terlinc and back onto the gravel shoulder. 

When pulled over, McClain was unable to 
provide police with either a driver's license or 
proof of Insurance. The officer detected the 
strong odor of alcoholic beverage on his 
breath. 

McClain initially agreed to field sobriety 
tests, but then refused all testing when in- 
structions were being given. 

He was arrested for DUI. McCain's idcnrJ- 
fiers were checked through LEADS/SOS and 
came back as revoked for previous DUI offenses. 

McClain was transported to the Antioch Po- 
lice DepL where he refused aU chemical testing. 
He'was put through booking procedures and is- 
sued citations for two counts of improper lane 
usage, driving under the Influence, failure to sig- 
nal when required, driving while revoked and 
operating an uninsured vehicle. 

He was released on personal recog- 
nizance pending his May 1 court date. 

No valid license, warrant arrest 

Mark A. Abear, 39, of 275 Oakridge Ct. In 
Antioch, was arrested for driving without a 
valid driver's license on April 6 at 7:45 p.m. on 
Rte. 83 south of Wilton. 

Police observed a vehicle driving with its 
high beams on and failing to dim them after 
passing several cars. 

When stopped, Abear told police he had 
no identification with him. His information 
was checked through LEADS/NCIC with in- 
formation coming back that he's not had a 
valid driver's license since 1984. 

Abear was arrested and placed In the 
squad car for transport to the Antioch Police 
DepL 

A routine check was men done on the 

passenger, Frank E. Fagin. 32, of 386 Lake St 
In Antioch, with information cqming back , . 
that he was wanted on two warrants through 
the Lake County Sheriff's Dept: $10,000 for 
DUI and $20,000 for criminal damage to 
property. He was arrested. 

At the Antioch Police DepL, Abear re- 
ceived citations for no valid driver's license 
and failure to dim headlights. He was released 



Illinois has sufficient landfill 
capacity for the next 16 years 



The remaining capacity for landfills in Illi- 
nois is sufficient for the next 16 years, accord- 
ing to the most recent data from the Illinois En- 
vironmental Protection Agency. 

According to the annual report, "Nonhaz- 
ardous Solid Waste Management and Landfill 
Capacity in Illinois- 1999 estimated remaining 
capacity was down only slightly from the 1998 

level. 

The report provides data on nonhazardous 
solid-waste landfill use for calendar year 1999. 
It also projects the number of years of capaci- 
ty remaining using data certified by licensed 
professional engineers. The report includes in- 
formation on waste transfer stations, land- 1 
scape waste compost facilities, incineration, 
waste generation and recycling. 

During 1999, Illinois' 53 landfills reported 
accepting over 50 million cubic yards of non- 
hazardous solid wastes; up from just under 45 
million cubic yards in 1998. Although the waste 
disposed increased 13 percent, the capacity 
declined only slightly due to new landfills 
opening in the second half of 1998. 

The report details waste-management ac- 
tivities in each of seven Illinois EPA adminis- 
trative regions, and lists the volumes of wastes 
landfilled. About 10 percent of solid wastes 
landfilled in Illinois in 1999, or about 5 million 
cubic yards (1.5 million tons), came from out- 
of-state. About three-fourths of it originated in 
Missouri. Although haulers also transported 
solid wastes to other states, that information is 

not required to be reported. 

Fifty-four Illinois landfills reported their 
available capacity on Jan. 1, 2000. Included in 
these figures are two inactive facilities: Spoon 
Ridge RDF in Fulton County and Sangamon. 

Valley Landfill in Sangamon County. Also, 
Cottonwood Hills in St. Clair County was still 
under development in 1999, but reported its 



projected capacity. 

Significant trends in recent years are the 
mergers of waste management companies, 
causing changes in ownership and operation 
of landfills and transfer stations in Illinois. The 
federal government pays close attention to the 
percent of market share owned by the various 
waste management companies. 

The Northwestern Illinois Region accepted 
99 percent more waste man the previous year, 
because of the opening in 1998 and 1999 of three 
new landfills: LandComp Landfill, Lee County 
Landfill and Onyx Orchard Hills Landfill 

The Metropolitan East St Louis Region re- 
ported an almost 160 percent increase in ca- 
pacity because of the inclusion of Cottonwood 
Hills Landfill, although it did not open until late 

Regional information identifies each land- 
fill and projects the year each is expected to 
reach capacity. These projections, completed 
by the landfills themselves, assume no new ca- 
pacity will be added. 

In 1999, 79 transfer stations handled near- 
ly 10 percent of .the waste landfilled in Illinois. 
Suite officials expect this number to increase in 
upcoming years. The state's 48 permitted com- 
posting facilities processed nearly 358,000 tons 
of landscape wastes, a seven percent gain over 
the 1998 number. The state's only nonhaz- 
ardous solid-waste incinerator I reported 
377,852 tons of waste incinerated in 1999. This 

facility closed in November 2< 

The report will be available by April 1 for 
viewing or downloading on the Illinois EPA web 
site at http://www.epastate.ll.us/land/Iandfill- 
capacity/ 1999/indcx.html, or copies can be re- 
quested by writing to the Illinois EPA's Solid 
Waste Management Section, P.O. Box 19276, 
Springfield, IL62794-9276, or by calling (217) 785- 

8604. 



i 



on personal recognizance pending hfs May 9- 
court date. 

Fagan was transported to the Lake Coun- 
ty Jail to await bond court. 

DUI 



•:•:• 



KimberiyA. Klingbiel, 31, of 42521 V 

land Place in Antioch, was arrested for driving 
under the influence of alcohol on April 5 at 12:32 
a.m. on east bound Rte. 1 73 at Eagle Ridge. 

Police observed a vehicle crossing over the 
fogline, varying speed, and finally crossing over 
the centerline on eastbound Rte. 173. While 
talking to Klingbiel, police detected the strong 
odor of alcoholic beverage on her breath. She 
refused to perform field sobriety tests. 

Klingbiel was arrested and transported to 
the Antioch Police Dept. where she refused all 
chemical testing. She was put through book- 
ing procedures and Issued citations for dri- 
ving under the influence, two counts of im- 
proper lane usage and operating an unin- 
sured vehicle. 

She was released on bond pending her 
May 1 court date. 

* 

LAKE VILLA 



DUI 

Erica P. Hayes, 22, of 42734 N. Poplar in 
Antioch, was arrested at the Lake Villa Police 
station when she went mere to bail out an ac- 
quaintance, charged with driving without a 
valid license and improper lane usage. Hayes 
approached a police car near her friend's 
Round Lake Beach home, asking how she 
could pay the $100 cash bond to release the 
man. She was told to go to the station. When 
she arrived, she dropped her keys, lost her 
balance while picking mem up and fell 
'against a desk. She admitted driving to the 
police station. She failed field sobriety tests, 
and tests yielded a result of .144 BAC She said 
she'd had three Long Island Iced Teas at Nut- 
tie's Bar. She was charged with DUI and DUI 
over .08 BAC She was released on a $3,000 1- 
bond, pending appearance at Waukegan 
courtroom C-402 on April 27 at 9 a.m. 

Brian K. Schluter, 32, of 2413 Plum Tree in 
lindenhurst, was arrested by Lake Villa Police 



on April 6 at midnight at Rte. 132 and Sheehan 
Dr. Police detected an odor of alcohol on him. 
He failed field sobriety tests, and registered a 
.08 BAC on the Intoxilizer. He admitted to 
drinking six beers. He was charged with DUI, 
DUI of .08 or more and driving with a suspend- 
ed license. He was released on an $3,000 1- 
bond pending appearance at Waukegan court- 
room C-402 on May 7 at 9 a.m. 

Warrant for burglary 

Adam J. Kanning, 25, of 12160 222nd Ave. 
in Bristol, Wis., was arrested by Lake Villa Po- 
lice on April 8 at 252 a.m. at Rte. 132 and 
Cremin when he was observed driving over 
the double line two times. He passed field so- 
briety tests, but police determined he was 
wanted on an active Lake County warrant for 
burglary, in the amount of $20,000. He was re- 
manded to the Lake County jaiL 

No license 

Brian J. Mach, 21, of 1005 Highland Rd in 
Mundelein, was stopped by Lake Villa Police 
on April 4 at 9:02 p.m. at Rte. 83 near Villa. He 
was charged with driving with no tailpipe, 
and driving without a license. He was served a 
notice to appear at Grayslake Branch III on 
May 9 at 3 p.m. 

License suspended 

Catherine D. Hanks, 31, of 40958 Rte. 83 
in Antioch was arrested by Lake Villa Police 
on April 4 at 8:06 a.m. when she was observed 
driving 4 8 mph in a 35 mphzoneon the 200 
block of Milwaukee Ave. (Rte. 83). She was 
charged with speeding and driving with a sus- 
pended license. She is to appear at Grayslake 
Branch HI on May 9 at 1*30 p.m. 

UNDENHURST 



No valid license 

Jose N. Reyes, 31, of 5Tlmes Sq. in Elgin, 
was arrested by Lindenhurst Police on April 4 
at 5:44 p.m. at Grand Ave. and Emerald Ln. 
He had no front license plate. He was charged 
with improper display of plates and no valid 
driver's license. He was released on $100 cash 
bond pending court appearance in Grayslake. 



- j 



Come 

Worship With Us 

A Directory Of 

Antioch Area Churches 



Graceland Baptist Own*. 258 Ida St, Anfach, IL 
Sunday School 1 1am, Morning Worship 1 lam, 
Sunday Evening 7pm Robert Wilams, Pastor. 

First ^$x^^t>^^s^k^s^^^m^ 
Harden, /Woch, Phone (847) 395-1 1 9a St/day School, Sunfey 
Ouch Serves 10:30am, Vtatesday, 7:30pm 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 5&4 Parkway, 
MoA Phone (8(7) 2654450 Sunday VfasNp al 9am, Sunday 

Scrod,^SdKd&^BifeOasses103C&a 

Heritage Lutheran Church Ihjerrusi Cw:Certo t 15i9fJkjBm 
Rd, Lhjernjrst (847) 356-176& Surfay service ION ant Sunday 
School & Bite Qass MO am (summer schedtJe • SCO am Sunday) 
Rev. MrtW/nfascn, Paste 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main SI, Phone 

(847) 39S-1500. Surrfay Worsr^> 8 & 10:30am, Sunday Schcd 

525am, Sat 7pm, Rev. Gregory Hermanson, Pastor. Christian 

Day School (847) 335-1664. 

uaibum Conp/egsbonal United Church of Christ Grass Lake 
Rd. at Rte. 45. Phone (847) 356-5237. Sunday Service 10am 
ChiHrens Program 10am Re* Pad a Ue&er, Pastor. 



St larata Epbcq* 977 bfcii a ftme (847) 395ffi£lcwfe 
730am, HpJtoaaOOTSurfaySchool itosery 
Restart BttohLfeftx 



395-1259. Vtashjp 830 & 10am, FetowNpTme 930am Sunday 
School 10am Rev. Gary Curl, Ffefcr. 

SL Peter* Church. 557 W. Late Si, Antioch. Phone (847)395- 
0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 630, 8, 9:30, 1 130am 
& Saturday 530pm Rev. Father Ronald K Angim, Pastor. 



Jrfi: 



Antioch EvangeW Free Church 750 Kp>wDiPrKne(847)39&. 
4117. Sunday Vfcrshp 8:15, 950 & tlXOam. Sunckay School br ai 
infant lfruadJ,930aTiChttEni Ouch 1 1am taana.fcih, 
Wbrnens Wristries, Mens Mrcres, (talh &a^ Serm Serix 
Pastor uMJUGrotaau 

St Stephen Lutheran Church (BXA). 1155 Hkide te. Rene (847) 
39W359. Sunday Worsr^p. 8 & MOam Rk Roger Hack, Paste 



Chaki of Ute fornraunBy Bible Church 2320 1W Gass Late 
M,Ar*ctRm(84q838ffl<aSur^ 

I Smal Group mreries. 



Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Oissouri Synod). 251 00 Vi 
Grand te. (Rte. 59 & 132), Late Via. (847) 356-5158. Sunday 
Worship 8:15 & 10:45am; Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible 
Study 930am Christian ' Preschool Rk John Zdbner, 



;k«u 



Late Rd, tofah Ftcne (847) 3&ffi72, Suniay Schod (al ages) 
9am, Suxtay Uomrg WorsHp 10am, Chitons Ouch 10am, 
Smfay Ewing Ytaship &3Qpm, Wateday V^ & Critans 
Program 7am, Tues. Wbmeris relowshp & BWe SWy 9-1 130am 
Jefi Bmssaryi Pastor. 



Lighthouse Church ol AntJoch 

554 Parkway to., Antioch, IL (847) 8384616. Saturday Evening 
Service 7:00 p.m M/enture Oub tor Kids, Adit BWe Study 
Saturday Evening 6:00 pm Monday Evening Bible Study 7:00 
p.m Thursday Evening PTS0 Support Group 7:00 p.m Senior 
Pastor Tom Bartmer. 



DariDugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 



Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



April 13, 2001 




SCHOOL DIGEST 




Carmel High School 

Alumni reunion 

Carmel High School will host its annual 
Alumni Reunion celebration on Saturday, June 
9. The festivities begin at 5 p.m. with a Mass in 
the school chapel, followed by an Hors' d'oeu- 
vre reception, dinner and dancing. The fol- 
lowing classcs'will be honored-1966, 71, 76, 
'81/91, and '96. 

For additional information, contact Mary 
Meehan, assistant development director at 
327-6382 or via e-mail at 
Mmeehan@carmelhs.org. 

Leadership awards earned 

Carmel High School has announced this 
year's recipients of the Vicariate I Youth Lead- 
ership Awards as sponsored by the Archdio- 
cese of Chicago. These awards are given to 
those students who are actively involved in the 
life of the Church through parish and Catholic 
High School programs. Most Reverend Gerald 
F. Kicanas, Auxiliary Bishop of Chicago be- 
lieves mat "young people are critical for the 
continued building of the Church; they bring a 
special energy and vitality through diverse 
gifts, talents and abilities." 

Those students who have been recognized 
for their contributions to youth ministry to ei- 



ther Carmel High School or member parishes 
are the following: 

St. Anastasia, Waukegan, Ryan Echevarria;. 
Carmel High School, Mundelein-Brandan 
Strickland, Bryan Smith, Jennifer Boarini and 
Sabrina Talarovich; St. Francis de Sales, Lake 
Zurich-Rob Allen and Kevin Gas; St. Gilbert, 
Grayslake-Alexandria Trubatisky, Ben Spon- 
seller, Nicole Bakota and Laura Bader. 

St. Joseph, Libertyville-Mary Beth Mo- 
roney; St. Joseph, Round Lake- Sal Cccala, 
Tony Sandoval, Eric Martin and Brian Psak; St. 
Mary, Mundelein-Meghan Oelerich, Sarah 
Stoeckel, Sheila Kennedy, Tom Quille, Vicki 
Davis and Eric Buckman; St. Mary of Vernon, 
Indian Creek-John Coli, Katie Rhcdin and Kim 
Roth; St. Patrick, Wadsworth-CIare Shcehan, 
Stephanie Dumalski, Bill Rygiel, Laura Gage 
and Mark Castillo; St. Paul the Apostle, 
Gurnee-Angela Schirber, Karen Martens, 
Matthew Clinton, Nicole Snyder and Cecilia 
Fern; St Peter, Antioch-Cara Morici and Matt 
Nelson; Prince of Peace-Katie Hoeflich and 
Rachel Milenden Transfiguration, Wauconda- 
KenBIaszak. 

Carmel senior 
earns national award 

Carmel High School has announced that 



senior Bryan A. Smith has been offered a cor- 
porate sponsored Achievement Scholarship by 
The Boule Foundation. Some 1 10,000 black 
students who took the 1999 PSAT/NMSQT en- 
tered the 2001 National Merit Program and 
also requested consideration in the Achieve- 
ment Program. From this group, 1 ,200 fulfilled 
requirements necessary to become finalists. All 
winners will share in approximately $2.5 mil- 
lion in scholarship money. 

Bryan Is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Smith of Mundelein. 

Spring musical 

Carmel High School will present its annu- 
al Spring Musical on April 27, 28 and 29. This 
year's production is The Sound of Music, H the 
Rodgcrs and Hammerstcin musical based on 
die story of the Trapp Family Singers. 

Performances are scheduled for 7:30 p.m. 
on April 27 and 28. The final performance is at 
2 p.m. Sunday, April 29. Tickets are $5 for 
adults and $4 for students and senior citizens. 
The Sunday, April 29 performance will sell se- 
nior citizen tickets for $2. Tickets can be pur- 
chased at the door 30 minutes before curtain. 
All seats are reserved. 

For more information, or to order tickets 
in advance, call die Carmel Choral Music office 



CLC NOTES 



Theatre presents 
One-Act Plays 

Two American Absurdist One-Act Plays 
will be presented by the College of Lake Coun- 
ty's theatre department. "Wanda's Visit" by 
Christopher Durang and "Zoo Story" by Ed- 
ward Albee will be performed at 7:309 p.m. 
April 13-14 and 19-21 in the Studio Theatre. An 
afternoon performance will be held at 2 p.m. 
April 18 for senior citizens and students. 

The contemporary one-act plays empha- 
size the unexpected, absurd, and sometimes 
brutal ways routine lives are interrupted by, 
bizarre characters. In the play "Wanda's Visit," 
Wanda recounts^ visit by an old higrrschool 
sweetheart to the home of a couple married for 
13 years. "Zoo Story" is set in Central Park 
where a man, who was sitting on a bench and 
enjoying his quiet reading, is interrupted by an 
unwelcome guest. 

Tickets are $8 general public and $6 for 
CLC students, alumni and seniors 65 and over. 
Call 543-2300 for tickets. 



9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Test Taking Strategies 
($25). 

1230-3:30 p.m.: Video Production ($39) 
1230-4:30 p.m.: Fan Car Racers ($45) 
1-4 p.m.: "Power Planning: Effective Use of 
a Daily Planner" ($25) and Web Page Magic 
($25). 

Registration will be accepted through April 
19. For program information or to enroll for 
classes, call the "Explore" registration line at 
543-2759. Dial 223-7580 to register by fax. Visa, 
MasterCard, Discover and American Express 
will be accepted. Payment is due at the time of 
registration. 



i 



New-student orientation, 






'Explore* program 
for Jr. High students 

The College of Lake County's "Explore" 
program for sixth, seventh and eighth grade 
students will offer a variety of academic, art, 
theatre and recreation mini classes on April 21. 
Classes will be held between 9 a.m. and 4:30 
p;m. at CLC's Grayslake Campus. Participation 
in the "Explore" program offers students a fun 
learning experience and an opportunity to ex- 
perience the college environment. 

The following classes will be offered on 
April 21: 9 a.m. -noon: Fencing II ($25), Soap 
Making ($25) and Improvisational Theater 
Games ($25). 



Parent information meetings 

The College of Lake County student devel- 
opment office will conduct several orientation 
sessions in April and May for graduating high 
school seniors as well as information sessions 
for parents of students interested in attending 
CLC. 

The new-student orientation sessions will 
beheld from 8:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. April 17, 19,24 
and 25 and May 3, 7, 8 and 16. In addition, one 
late afternoon session will be held from 3:30-8 
p.m. on April 30 and one Saturday session from 
8:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. on April 28. All sessions will 
be held at die Grayslake Campus in the audito- 
rium, C005i _ 

The sessions will include a multimedia pre 
sentation about CLC, a campus tour and infor- 
mation about financial aid, admission require- 
ments and CLC programs and services. Stu- 
dents also will complete academic advisement, 
course selection and registration. New stu- 
dents are strongly encouraged to attend at least 
one orientadon session. Prior to attending the 
orientation, students must have a CLC appli- 



cation on file in the admissions office. They 
also must have completed die basic skills as- 
sessment process by taking CLC's basic skills 
test or submitting high school or college tran- 
scripts and ACT, SAT or GED scores for evalu- 

aUon. ^^ -.tutu— 

The parent information meetings will be 
held from 6-7:30 p.m. April 23 and May 1 at the 
Grayslake Campus. An information session will 
be held from 6-7:30 p.m. on April 18 in S206 at 
the Lakeshore Campus in Waukegan. The sesr 
sion will present information about admission 
requirements and services provided by coun- 
seling, financial aid, student activities and the 
_ office of special needs. * , 

•— Pre- registration is required for both the .on* - 

entations and parent information meetings. 
. Tickets are"$8 general public and $6 for CLC 
students, alumni and seniors 65 and over. 
Call 543-2090 for more information. 



at 327-6348 or e-mail Judy Territo, drama 
teacheratJTerrito@carmelhs.org. 

Student Council 
election results 

The following students have been elected 
to Carmel High School Student Council and 
Class Boards for the 2001-02 school year. 

Executive Board: President, Collin Glancy 
of Gurnee: 1st Vice President, Maria Rito of 
Lake Zurich; 2nd Vice President, Andrea Roach 

of Libertyville; Recording Secretary, Julie Dren- 
nan of Libertyville; Corresponding Secretary, 
Siiri Marquardt of Libertyville; Treasurer, Jen- 
na Stickley of Gurnee. 

ienior Board: Margaret Sweeney of Round 
Lake, Chelsea Mulvey of Wauconda, Lauren 
Unsner of Lake Zurich, Tricia Blomgren of 
Mundelein, Heather Titus of Mundelein, and 
Emily Sylwestrak of North Barrington. 

Junior Board: Matt Orscheln of Hawthorn 
Woods, Joe Quille of Mundelein i Kevin Jackson 
of Lake Zurich, Elizabeth Coffey of Kildeer. 
Molly Day of Kildeer and Roy Hilo Jr. of . 
Gurnee. 

Sophomore Board: Becky Smith of 
Mundelein, Brandon Ziemann of Antioch, Alex 
Bieschke of Gurnee, Natalie Greene of Cary, 
Katie Duffin of Mundelein, and Patrick Kimen- 
er of Grayslake. 

Freshman class officers will be elected in 
the fall of 2001. 




FROM PAGE Al 






by ACHS Dist 1 17 will be paid by the admin- 
istrative center cooperaUve. 

ACHS provided the land for the township 
center that will be built on the northeast cor- 




Patents and 
Copyrights workshop 

The use of protection of "Patents, Copy- 
rights and Trademarks'* will be covered in a 
one-day workshop from 9 a.m.-l p.m. April 14 
at the Technology Campus on CLC's Grayslake 
Campus. 

Attorney Steve Weseman will discuss the 
necessary legal and business tools needed to 
protect and profit from your intellectual prop- 
erty—inventions, manuscripts, designs, songs, 
business names and more. Students will learn 
how to distinguish and use copyrights proper- 
ly, understand the costs for registering trade- 
marks and patents and how to use the Internet 
to get information about intellectual property. 

The cost is $39. To register by phone, dial 
223-1111. For course information, call 543- 
2726. 



ner of the intersection of Deep Lake and Grass 
Lake roads, and will extend utilities from the 
high school to the center. ' 

Antioch Township has plans to use the 
proceeds from the sale of its current building 

^totielp with the constructlbn'ebatfcj ttna Lake I 

Villa will add to the funding kitty as well. 

When complete, the center will house the \ 
administrative offices for ACHS Distl 17, and ) 
the Antioch Township offices. There will be.a 
large area for senior citizen and community 
programs, and it will be the site for the Meals 
on Wheels program for Northwest Lake Coun- 
ty, though the Antioch Senior Center will still 
operate die Meals on Wheels program for An- 
tioch. 



«• 




loss of revenue from water actives in die Chan- 
nel Lake and Lake Catherine would be signifi- 
cant,'' the report states. 

The area has 26,000 permitted boaters, but 
it is difficult to say how many are mainly using 
Channel Lake and Lake Catherine. 

The report gives information on geologi- 
cal and topographical, ground water hydrolo- 
gy. It also gives information on historic and 
current lake water quality. 



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CREATIVE COMMUNICATIONS 2000 




writer 



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FED.,"STATE, E-FILE ONLY $75.00 




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Antioch. Illinois 60002 
847.395-2600 



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PEKIN 




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<Pe6in t Qftinois 

wwwyetiininsurancexom 



The Underwriter Merit Award 
has been presented to this out- 
standing Pckin Insurance 
Agency. This honor is the com- 
pany's way of acknowledging 
the determination, dedication, 
and commitment necessary for 
this agency to provide superior 
service to its policyholders. 
The award is based on profes- 
sional skill and knowledge of 
properly/casualty insurance. 
We are proud that this agency 
represents Pekin Insurance in 
serving the people of this area. 
This is the 1 5th year that 
Osmand Insurance Service, 
Ltd. has earned the 
Underwriter of Merit Award. 







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April 13, 2001 






NEIGHBORS 



iMkeland Newspapers/ A 7 




theater in need 



By JUUE MURPHY 
Staff Reporter 




When Utica's community theater since 
1913, Players of Utica, in New Hartford, N.Y. 
sent a letter asking for financial help to rebuild 
the theater after a fire, PM&L Theatre in Anti- 
och responded. 

They had a catastrophic event and 
burned down," said Ken Smouse, one of the 
founders of PM&L Theatre. They sent out an 
appeal to all community theaters in the Unit- 
ed States asking for $100 to help them rebuild, 
and we did." 

According to the statement by Players of 
Utica, the central New York theater was burned 
down in an arson fire that also destroyed the 
theater group's lighting, sound, shop and tech- 
nical equipment, costumes and props, records 

and memorabilia and a new computer system. 

The statement thanked PM&LTheatre and 
said, "Upon receipt of our letter, the members 
of the local theater group forwarded a gener- 
ous donation-displaying mat the term 'com- 
munity theatre' has a meaning beyond the ob- 
vious one, and that mere truly is a nationwide 
community of colleagues who love, support 
and participate in live theater and related arts." 

PM&LTheatre will present a free reader's 
theater on April 22 at 230 p.m . , and will finish 
out its 40th season with "How to Succeed in 
Business Without Really Trying" and "Barefoot 
in the Park." 




Reader's theater 

features 




By JUUE MURPHY 

Staff Reporter 




The PM&LTheatre will present a one-act 
reader's theater production on April 22 at 230 
p.m. at the PM&L Theatre located at 877 Main 
StinAntioch. * 

. The director Fran Jans t a adapted this work 
of Bradbury's, a sci-fi story about an electric 
grandmother, for mis PM&LTheatre produc- 
tion. Bradbury lived and worked in Waukcgan 
for many years. 

; The cast is made up of Antioch residents 
Trish and Fran Jansta, Dee Baum and Gene 



LeFave, as well as Dianne Hosken of Linden- 
hurst 

Admission is free, and the performance 
should last about one hour. After the show, stay 
for cookies and conversation with the cast 
' For more information, call 838-1032. 



*• 



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available for 

burn grads 




By HELEN MANSFIELD 

Staff Reporter 



- 






- ;.-..• ■•' 'pi- 

/ .. . 

Name: Sandy Norwood 
Home: Antioch 

Occupation: Owner of Hair Designs Unlimited 

Community involvement: Chamber member, and 

member of Illinois Cosmetology Association 

I'm originally from: I was born in Evanston, grew up 
in Deerfleld, and then moved here 

I graduated from: Highland Park High School 

My family consists of: My daughter Wendy Pratt 
who owns Horse Play Haven on Rte. 173, her husband 
Jeff who owns WMJ Enterprises heating and cooling in 

Antioch, and their son Miles 

My pets are: A dog named Jimmy Olson who is owned by a cat named Clark 

Kent, another cat named Famous Phantom, a Morgan horse named Lady Spice and 
a Quarter Horse named Moose 





What I like best about my town: I like the people in town 

The secret to my success: Perseverance and kindness 
I relax by: I horseback ride, or I go to the show with Miles 

My perfect day in Antioch would be: Getting out on a trail ride at the Chain 

O'Lakes state park 

Last book I read: One of the "Harry Potter" books 
Favorite TV show is: "Angel* 




Favorite movie: "Pretty Woman 




Favorite band or musician: Oldies or easy listening music 
Favorite restaurant: Stage Stop 

- 

My life's motto is: Treat people with respect and kindness 



3, 



If I won the lottery, I would: Buy all of the vacant land in 

keep it vacan qf/KMItK 

My greatest accomplishment is: I have yet to get there 



County and 





I want to be remembered as: As a gorgeous, thin, tall, blue-eyed blonde with 

a vivacious smile - hah! 

My pet peeve is: To tell me you're going to do something and then not do it 



i: 



CC 






- * 






If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in this column, call 



Lakeland Newspapers at 223*8161: *> 



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UNDERWRITER 
i OF MERIT / 







Martin 
Insurance Agency 




4001 Roberts Roa 
Island Lake. Illinois 60042 

847-526-5755 






\ 



Students who attended Millburn Com- 
munity Consolidated School in Wadsworth 
can apply for a new set of scholarships this 
year. 

Graduates from Antioch High School, 

Grayslake Community High School, Carmel 

High School and Warren Township High 

School that attended and graduated from the 

Wadsworth elementary school can apply for 

one of four $1 ,000 scholarships. 

According to PTO President Robin Khay- 

at applicants will have to turn in a 250 word 
essay on why they think they are deserving of 
the scholarship. 

The scholarship is open to males or fe- 
males attending any recognized college or 

university. 

Khayat said the PTO will see how this year 
goes and hopes to continue and expand the 
scholarship fund in the future. 

"We want our graduates to stay interest- 
ed in Millburn," she said. 

. For more information, contact the your 
local high school councilor or Scholarship 
Committee Chairperson Therese Schmidt at 

356-5723. 



Merri Martin, 

LUTCF.CIC 

The Underwriter of Merit Award has been presented to this out- 
standing Pekin Insurance Agency. This honor is the Company's way 



* ■ - 

of acknowledging 



e determination, dedication, and commitment 
ssary for this agency to provide superior service to its policyhold- 
The award is based on professional skill and knowledge of prop- 
erty/casualty insurance. We are proud that this agency represents 

le people of this area. This is the eighth 







year that Martin Insurance Agency has earned the Underwriter 
Merit Award. 



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Friday, April 13 

7:30-8:30 a.m., The Business Networking 
Group meets at Centre Lights Cafe next to 
Condell in Ubertyville, call Dan at 803990 




Saturday, April 14 

9:30-11 a.m., Singles Breakfast Group for 
ages 55 plus. Held at In-Laws Restaurant. 
720 Milwaukee Ave. In Gumee. Call Pat at 
367-4936 to find out more 

Sunday, April 15 

Easter Sunday observed 

Monday, April 16 

12:45 p.m., Bingo held at The Antioch 
Senior Center, call 395-7120 for details 

5:30 p.m., TOPS group meets In 
Undenhurst at the Victory Ambulatory 
Surgery Center and Outpatient Services at 
1050 Red Oak Lane. Call Tina at 265-9364 

6 p.m., Police and Fire Commission at 
village hall 

7-9 p.m., Young Onset Parkinson's Support 
Group meets at Grace Lutheran Church, 
502 Valley Park Dr. in Ubertyville. Group 
addresses topics of concern to the younger 
person with Parkinson's and tftefr 3 caregivers. 
Refreshments served, for info., "calf Mariene 
at 367-1679 or Jan at 395-5502 

• m - 



■ 



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7:30 p.m., Antioch Village Board meets at 
village hall 

BBHC 

7:30 p.m., Antioch Coin Club meets at 
Antioch Public Ubrary 

7-9 p.m., Lakes Area Community Band 
rehearsal at ACHS, call 395-6729 

Tuesday, April 17 

7 a.m., Altrusa International of Lake County 
hold a breakfast meeting at Bob & Ann's 
Restaurant, 1739 N. Sheridan Road in 
Waukegan. Carol Morris of the Lake County 
Literacy Program wilt be giving an update on 
current literacy programs in Lake County.. 
Members and guests encouraged to bring a 
new or gently-used children's book to 
donate. For information on Altrusa 
membership or attending the meeting, call 
Julie Lundquist at 249-2914 

9:30 a.m., Daybreak, a weekly social 
activity program for adults in the early to 
middle stages of Alzheimer's and,related 
memory disorders, meets at the Westosha 
Community Center in Bristol, Wis. For info., 
call 1-800-472-8008 



6:45 p.m., Antioch VFW Bingo, 
4:30 p.m., call 395-5393 



• (•:# 



rsopen 







.< 







7 p.m., School Board meeting. Grass Lake 
Dist. #36 



Wednesday, April 18 

7 p.m., Burlington Genealogical Society 
meets. Special presentation on "How 
Common are your Ancestral Surnames: 
Simplify Internet Research." Held in the 
Historical Society Museum, comer of 
Perkins Blvd. and Jefferson St, Burlington, 
Wis. Call Marion at (262) 763-6981 



7 p.m., Antioch Park Board meets at village 
hall 

7:30 p.m., The Republican Club meets at 
Antioch Twp.Hall, 395-1670 



• 






-c 



Thursday, April 19 

8-9 a.m., Network Lake County, a business 
networking group, meets at In-Laws 
restaurant in Gumee, guests invited, to 
information, call 548-5305 



7 p.m., An evening of poetry and fiction 
readings by contributors to CLC's "Willow 
Review" literary magazine held in room . 
C003 at CLC's Grayslake campus. Free and 
open to the public, for info., call 543«2557i|gj 



7:30 p.m., Antioch Community High School 
Board meets 



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GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Call 223-81 61 and ask for 
calendar assistance. Ore-mail 
calendar@lakelandmedia.com 



IT, 




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•• A8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



April 13, 2001 



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So why is it called Good Friday? 



In this day and age, we are free to choose 
who we worship and who we wish would 
vacate some of the cable channels for re- 
runs of I Love Lucy. So being Catholic has 
never really been a burden for folks living in 
the United States. Most of us, as children, 
were rarely cracked across the knuckles by 
any ruler-yielding nuns or threatened with 
eternal damnation for acts of misbehaving. 
Even though the weekly church going thing 
sometimes interferes with football games, 
there are plenty of other options to fit church 
in before kick-off (God was obviously not a 

football fan). 

Some Catholics have a difficult time with 
i not being allowed to eat meat on all the Fri- 
day's during Lent, but for the most part we 
have gotten use to ordering our pizza with 
only mushrooms or eating pancakes for din- 
ger instead. However, this Ash Wednesday 
and Good Friday fasting requirement does 
create a few grumpier than usual Catholics. 

On any routine day, food is just some- 
thing we consume because the clock says it is 
time to eat. With our busy lives and hectic ' 
schedules, it is not unusual for us to eat a gra- 
nola bar or apple for lunch followed by a 
piece of cheese for dinner. But then comes 
along Ash Wednesday and Good Friday and 
for those tortured souls who are supposed to 
refrain from eating anything of substance, 
well even brussel sprouts look appetizing. 

We all realize it is simply mind over mat- 
ter, because every overpaid psychologist tell 
us so, but these minds can't get over the 
thought of all that matter going uneaten. 
Usually the kitchen is nothing more than a 
nook off the family room where an occasional 
meal is consumed, but on those fasting days, 
• its impossible to venture even near the 
kitchen without first grazing through the re- 




JINGLE FROM 
PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



frigerator. Every crumb in the toaster calls out 
to you, every morsel on the bottom of the re- 
frigerator beckons to the devout; even the 
gunk that clings to the blade of your electric 
can opener has the hungry soul wondering 
"how bad can that possibly taste with a little 
ketchup on it?" 

At least on Ash Wednesday, Catholics are 
easy to spot because they openly proclaim . 
their faith by donning "ashes" in the middle 
of their forehead. This makes it easier for 
non-Catholic to be a little more supportive of 
those toting messy foreheads — there is a rea- 
son for the gruffy attitude— their hungry. But 
Good Friday doesn't come equipped with any 
warning device for those confronted by the 
devout, so they aren't so easily recognized. 
But tomorrow ends the torture. Come Satur- 
day, it is food as usual. So those of you out 
mere driving on the highways around mid- 
night tonight, will notice the surprising num- 
ber of kitchens lit up all along the roadside. 
You can be assured that in those lighted 
households are millions of Catholics waiting, 
with fork in hand, for their kitchen clock to 
strike midnight so they can open the refriger- 
ator and make up for lost time. 

And so goes another "Jingle from 
Pringle." 

Readers with information for "Jingle from 
Pringle" should call Lynn Pringle at 395- 
6364. 



Bank director leaves. Perrone fills vacancy 

r %J 



By JULIE MURPHY 
'Staff Reporter 


















Dr. Albert Bucar, a director for 27 years at 
the State Bank of The Lakes retired from active 
board duty but will remain as director emeri- 
tus, according Randy Miles, bank president 
and chairman of the board. 

"Al's many years here (at State Bank of The 
Lakes) have been rewarding for us all and he 
has been a pleasure to work with," said Miles in 
a statement to bank employees. "We look for- 
ward to seeing Al and Linda at all bank func-. 
tions for a long time to come." 

Bucar's list of professional achievements 

include an honorary DOS (Doctorate of Opto- 

metric Science) for meritorious service to the 

eyecare profession, past presidency of the 

* American Optometric Association, organizing 



and chairing the Illinois Vision Services and 
earning the title of Illinois Optometric Associ- 
ation Optometrist of the year. 

Within Lake County, Bucar has served as 
vice chairman of the Lake County Health" Ser- 
vices Planning Council and as vice president of 
the Lake County Mental Health Society. 

Bucar practiced in Antioch for over 35 
years. He was vice chairman of the Bicentenni- 
al Commission, a past president of the Lions 
Club, a charter member of PM&L Theatre and 
has served on the board of education of both 
Antioch Community High School and St. Peter 
Grade School. 

Mike Perrone, owner of the Deli Source, 
has been invited to fill the vacancy on the board 
of directors for the bank left by Bucar. He has 
accepted the invitation and will be elected at 
the April 18 board meeting. 









Wedding/Engagement/ 
Anniversary announcements 

To announce a wedding, engagement or anniversary, call (847) 223-8161. 

There is a short form to fill out and return. 

Forms can be mailed or faxed to you. 

Photos are welcome. Fees are listed on the forms. 

Mailing address: Lakeland Media, 30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake, IL 60030. Attn: Bridal Sec. 
Call Nancy Thielsen (847) 223-8161, ext. 143, with questions. 












. 






' 



Dr. Brian L. Farquhar, formerly of Grayslake Family 
Eyecare, is welcoming patients to the following 2 offices: 



- ' - . r 



«1~* 



« m * b^ wm m 

Wilmot Road Family Eyecare 

3920 N. Wilmot (Johnsburg) Road 

McHenry, IL 60050 

(81 5) 385-0002 



' 



Vito A. Racanelli, O.D. 
Brian L. Farquhar, O.D. 







*Wide selection of designer frames available. 

*20 minutes west of Grayslake 



.< 



. > 



Center For Advanced Eyecare 

Crossings Plaza - Suite L 



-4 



* I 



V 1 



300 N. Milwaukee (Rte. 83) 
Lake Villa, II 60046 

(847)356^0700 
Mitchell A. Jactson, M.D. 



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Brian L Farquhar, O.D. 
^obertA. Levme, O.D. *m 



Dr. Farquhar specializes In: 
•the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of eye disease 
Including glaucoma and 
conjunctivitis, 
-contact lens fitting 
including specialty lenses 
for astigmatism and 
keratoconus and bifocal 
contact lenses, 
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-consultation for and 
co-management of Laser . 
vision correction. 






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*10 minutes north of Grayslake on Rte. 83. 



E-Mail Dr. Farquhar at 
BriFarquhar@msn.com 



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Teddy talk 

Teddy bear artist and designer Sue Van Dyke helps Sarah Ewing of Gumee with 
her bear's nose during a bear-making class at Josie's Bears and Dolls in Antioch. 
—Photo by Candace H. Johnson 



PEOPLE NEWS 






I 

Scholarship awarded 

Shannon Bishop of Antioch, was award- 
ed the Eastern Illinois University Judge and 
Usha Oberoi scholarship. Parents are Steve and 
Diane Bishop of Antioch. Bishop is a senior 
majoring in Computer Management/Admin- 
istrative Information Systems and Business Ed- 
ucation. 

* 

Deans list 

Grace Moran, Antioch and Jamie Jor- 

gensen of Antioch have been named to the 
dean's list at Bradley University. 

Air Force 

Air Force Capt Anna Schneider has 

been named as the 426th Information Opera- ' 
tions Squadron company grade officer of the 
year. She is the daughter of .Gary Winner of 
Plainfield and Suzette Winner of Antioch. 

Certificate awarded 

Patrick Duggan from Osmond Insur- 
ance, Antioch, was among those awarded a 
certificate for successfully completing a Pekin 
Insurance Life and Health for the Novice 
School. 

Allstate agent 

Jim Little of Antioch is among an elite 
group of Allstate Insurance agents who earned 
the "Personal Financial Representative'' title. 
Little received the Personal Financial Repre- 
sentative title after passing the Series 6 and Se- 
ries G3 securities licensed exams and complet- 
ing an extensive Allstate training curriculum. 

Field Study Fellowship 

Christopher Bryant of Trevor, Wis. has 
been selected as a member of the field study 
and curriculum development component of 
the Yale University project, Teaching Frontier 
China." Bryant, who teaches at Antioch Upper 
Grade School in Antioch, was one of 40 educa- 
tors selected from a national pool of more than 



200 applicants to participate in part one, an in- 
tensive summer institute held at Yale Universi- 
ty's Center for International and Area Studies. 

Earned honors 

Erin Ryan of Antioch, a senior majoring 
in business, was among Edgewood students 
who received honors by achieving at least a 3.5 
GPA average for the semester. 

Army graduate 






Army Pvt Christopher Anderson has 

graduated from the wheeled vehicle repair j 
course at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Ab-<* . 
erdeen, Md. Anderson is the son of Michelle ■'. 
Morin of Genoa City, Wis. and Walter Ander- 
son of Antioch. 



RMV1AX Top 20 



JJ^M 




Patricia Ciko, a sales 
associate with RE/MAX 
Advantage Realty, Anti- 
och has been honored 
by RE/MAX of North- 
ern Illinois as one of its 
Top 20 individual sales 
producers for 2000. 
Ciko ranked 19 th. 



Ciko 



Presidential Scholarship 

Zachary Pratt, a senior at Antioch Com- 
munity High School and the son of Wayne and 
Carla Pratt of Antioch has been awarded a Pres- 
idential Scholarship to attend North Central 
College. 

Earned honors 

The University of Wisconsin- Parkside has 
announced the names of the Antioch students 
included on the dean's list They are: Michelle 
Gall n Is, Cornelia Haugk, Cindy Kuechle, 
David Tomasello, Amy Vanderkooy, LydJa 
Keehn, Klmberly Small. 




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THE 
CUPBOARD 




In the works 












In basketball, just like any other sport, the 
only way to get better is to keep playing. 
And it helps to have positive role models 
there providing instruction. 

That's the target for the Future Hoopsters 
Youth Basketball Camp, scheduled to begin 
its first spring session April 16 in the 
Grays lake High School field ho use. 

Jerry Ming.an official for the high school 
and collegiate 1 e vels.as well as one of the 
camp instructors and coordinators, has seen 
his share of first-class athletes. 

"The young players really look up to the 
older people, especially the high school play- 
ers," he said. "They (the kids) get excited be- 
cause they look at diem and say, this is some- 
thing I can work towards. They see their level 
of play and it gives them something to try and 
attain. And the instructors I've seen at various 
camps in the past are classy people, good stu- 
dents and excellent athletes." 

Co-coordinator and Grayslake High varsi- 
ty girls head coach Mike Muldrow also has * 
high aspirations for the upcoming camp. 

"Area high school players and coaches 
will provide instruction and demonstrations," 
he said. "It's going to be a nice camp where 
we can provide a lot for the kids while keep- 
ing the cost reasonable for them." 

Speaking of specifics, the camp will con- 
sist of 10 one-day sessions, running from 7- 
830 p.m. Monday and Thursday's, the last 
day being May 17. 

It is for boys and girls in fifth through 
eighth -grade. The cost of the camp is $80, which 
includes die entire session, a ball and T-shirt 

Interested players are encouraged to sign- 
up as soon as possible. Coach Muldrow also 
noted that the final chance to register will be 
the second week of camp, May 23. 

"It's a little different in that it's during the 
evenings. But we're looking at a pretty good 
turnout," he said JB T~ [ 

Interested parties can contact coach 
Muldrow at 223-8621 , ext 4970. 

Hopeful instructors include former Lake 
Zurich standout and current National champ 
women's player Alicia Ratay of Notre Dame. 
Former Glenbrook South star and current 
Norwestern University player Dana Leonard 
andlany Miner, coach of the state champ 
AAU team as well as Prairie State teams, are 
also being pursued. 




*> 



April 13, 2001 




Sequoit volleyball sets sights on county meet 



By JOE PRUSKI 
Correspondent 



The mission for this years Antioch boys 
volleyball team is simple; make few errors in 
individual matches and finish with a record 
topping last season's mark of 9-17. . 

"We definitely want to improve on last 
years record and finish as one of die top eight 
seeds in our sectional," said head coach 
Heather Coleman. 

Key returnees on this year's squad have 
plenty of experience to lead die team to 
achieving their goals this year. Senior Ben 
Tatro, junior Adam Jordan and junior Lee Cim- 
poes will play major roles in determining the 
success of this year's club. 

'This was a hand fought game. 

Hopefully this will lead us into the 

Lake County Invitational 9 

Heather Coleman, 
ACHS head coach 



Fax Lake's Lee Monster, age 9, partici- 
pated in the U.S. Nadonal Folkstyle Wrestling 
Championships held in Topeka, Kansas. Mini- 
ster qualified for this event by taking first-place 
in die 9-10-year-old division in the Illinois 
State Wrestling Championships last month. 

He wrestled in nine matches, winning sev- 
en en route to a fifth-place finish and achieving 
the status of All -American" in the sport During 
Nationals, Munster wrestled state champs and 
place-winners from Oregon, Wyoming, Kansas, 
Missourie, Illinois and Michigan. His overall 
record for die season was a sparkling 44-5. 

Munster represents die Wrestling Factory 
of Libertyville, where he is coached by Tony 
Hernandez and John McGrath. 



Hie Llbeityvllle-Veraon Hills High 
School varsity boys Lacrosse team defeat- 
ed Hinsdale Central 15-4. Luke Thompson, • 
Greer Hanlon and Ken Ormsby each scored 
three goals. Tyler Labrum added two while 
Ben Mosko, Matt Hudson, Dan Yates and Nick 
Zare chipped in with one goal apiece. The bal- 
anced scoring attack was complemented by 
the strong goaltending of Andy KapraL 

Registration for Round Lake Spartan 
Youth Football will take place Friday, April 
27 from 6-8 p.m. and Saturday, April 28 from 
9 a.m.- 1 2 noon at the Round Lake Area Park 
District 

The program is for grades 1-8. The non- 
refundable fee for registration is $25. 

Please call George at 546-8558 for further 
details. 



John Phelps can be reached at (84 7) 223-8161 
ext 132; fax (847) 223-8810; or e-mail at 
ediWlndcom. 



See County Section for 
additional sports coverage 




ar, the Sequoits have compiled a 
record of 4-6, including a tough loss to Larkin 
High School April 8; 

The team won the first game 17-15 but 
seemed to fall apart in the second, losing by a 
score of 2-15. 

"We lost the interest in (die second 
game)/ said Coleman. 

The third and deciding game would stay 
close through its en tire ty. The team that held 
the service would prevail. 

The Sequoits clawed to within two points 
late in the game (1 1:13) but could not get any 
closer, eventually falling 11-15. 

Coleman attributes die loss simply to mis- 
takes. The team finished with 22 hitting errors, 
including seven uncharacteristic errors from 
the normally flawless Tatro. On the year, Tatro 




Antioch's Jason Myers (right) and Lee Cimpoes go up for a block during the Se- 
quoits home volleyball match with Carmel.-Photo by Steve Young. 

is averaging over 10 kills per contest with a 91 
percent efficiency. 

Cimpoes led the team in kills against 
Larkin, finishing with 14. 

This was a hard fought game. Hopefully 
this will lead us into die Lake County Invita- 
tional," said Coleman. 

■ The team is looking to duplicate its fourth- 
place finish from last year by finishing first or 



second out of their respecdve pool. 

Schools compedng in die County Invite 
and in die same pool as Antioch are 
Waukegan, Zion Benton, and Mundelein, the "* 
same teams they faced in last years tourna 

ment. . 

The Lake County I nvitational will be held 
at Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire April 
12 and 14. 



Lady Sequoit girls track edges Stevenson 




By JOE PRUSKI 
Correspondent 



The Antioch girls track team is quickly 
making their way towards the elite teams in the 
conference. 

Such was the case against Stevenson on 
April 9 at Antioch when the Sequoits defeated 
the Stevenson 84-66. 

As has been the story to this point, junior 
Sara Brzezinski led the team running by win- 
ning four events. Brzezinski set a personal- 
best record in the 300 low hurdles. She also fin- 
ished first in the 800 with a time of 2:32 fol- 
lowed by Antioch's Mandy Hughes in second 

and Kari Hint* in thirdi"" 

"I think I did really well. I felt really good, 
Brzezinski said. M I think I'm getting faster than 
I was when I was a freshman and in earlier 
years." 

Aside from her individual efforts, Brzezin- 
ski also contributed to die victorious 3200 me- 




ter relay and the 1600 meter relay. Other mem- 
bers of the winning relay teams include Jessica 
Misic, Bonner, and Hughes for die 3200 and 
Amanda Dimarco, Sara Ezell, and Hughes for 
the 1600. 

"I think we still have a lot to learn, but so far 
we're running great, strong, and confident," 
said Hughes. 

The Sequoits also received help form their 
top distance runner, junior Laura Hammond, 
who took first in the 3200 meter race with a 
time of 13:01. 

Senior Bethany Shore also contributed two 
first-place scores in the shot put (33'2i>") and 
discuss (lOl'lO"). 

Head coach Brent Pitt feels his team is right 
where they need to be to achieve their goal of 
finishing in the top three in the NSC p 

"Last year we finished sixth in conference 
This year, we're going to surprise a lot of peo- 
ple," he said. "The freshmen are shining. If we 
don't do it this year, watch out next year." 




As for die boys, they traveled to compete 
against the host school as well as Stevenson. 
The team finished second, beating Round Lake 
but falling short of Stevenson. 

"The team is not up to par yet If we work 
harder we will have better results down the 
road," said senior Mike Mercado. Mercado fin- 
ished first in die 400 meter race. "I think I could 
have run better," he commented about his 
time. 

Junior Jared Stolarik also took first in the 
discuss. Senior Kevin Podstawa was beaten for 
die first time this season in die 1 10-meter high 
hurdles. He finished second. 

"It felt like a ton of bricks were lifted off my 
shoulders. Now I don't have die pressure to 
worry about taking first every time I run," Pod- 

stawasaid. 

The girls will travel to North Chicago on 
April 16 to face Zion- Ben ton and North Chica- 
go. The boys will host die same two opponeni 
at home the same day. 



i- 








Hungarland power 




uoit booters 



~:r 



By JOE PRUSKI 
Correspondent 



The Antioch girls soccer team Is hoping to 
use the teamwork they displayed April 8 
against die Vernon Hills Cougars as a model to 
follow throughout the remainder of the season. 

The Sequoits defeated die Cougars 8-0 in a 
game that showcased three multi-goal scorers, 
a defensive masterpiece, and a record-break- 
ing performance. 

Leading scorer senior Emily Niles scored 

her seventh, eight, and ninth goals of the sea- 
son in earning the hat trick. 

ienior Lauren Konrath and sophomore 
Lauren Cole contributed with two goals apiece 
along with sophomore Robyn Mortenson, 
whose lone goal began the scoring for die Se- 
quoits early in the first half. ; 

"We played very well at times. As a coach, 
you always want to dominate. There were 





times we didn't... but we did a nice job," said 
head coach Charlie Trout 

Although die Sequoits may not have dom- 
' inated at all times, their defense definitely did. 
Aside from pitching the shutout, they allowed 
only four shots on goal in the entire game. 

Of the eight goals scored by Antioch, junior 
Lauren Hungarland broke the school record for 
. assists in a game with five. 

A modest Hungarland was quick to table 
the record and praise die team for a game well 
played. 

"We're playing a lot better. We play as a 
team and everyone is unselfish," said Hungar- 
land. 

, Konrath agreed: "Teamwork and moving 
die ball through our defense, midfielders, and 
forwards helped contribute to our win." 

As die team gains more experience, they 
seem to play together better. Niles feels that this 
is an important step in succeeding this season. 



* 






With every game and every practice we re • 
improving and getting better together," said 
. Niles. 

The Sequoits goals have remained the -5* 
same through die beginning of the season - 
take one game at a time and let the rest just 
happen. 

"When you play good soccer everything 
else takes care of itself," said Trout i + 

Although sporting a winning record early 
in the season, Antioch will take it one game at 
a time and try to concentrate on upcoming 
games instead of dwelling on past perfor- 
mances.* 

"We have some big games ahead of us," ' 

said Hungarland. 

The first of those big games will take place 
at Polley Field, where the Sequoits will look to 
improve on their 3-2 record when it plays host 
to Libertyville in a North Suburban Conference 
Lake Division match-up April 19 at 4:30 p.m. 





wr 




A10 I Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



April 13, 2001 







ftr. 



LOCAL GOLF SCENE; NEWS, NOTES, LESSONS, OUTINGS 






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The Mundeloln High School Athletic 
Boosters will hold their second annual MH8 
Athletic Booster Golf Outing featuring the 
MHS Hall of Fame Banquet on Tuesday, June 
19 at the Steeplechase Golf Club in 
Mundeleln. The banquet will follow imme- 
diately at the Crown Plaza Hotel, formerly the 
Mundeleln Holiday Inn. 

Last year's outing saw 124 golfers take to 
the links to help raise $19,000 that was used 
to purchase athletic equipment for the train- 
ing room to be used by all Mundeleln High 
School athletes. 

Packages of Golf Only, Golf and Dinner, 
or Dinner alone tickets will be available. For- 
mer MHS students and staff will be inducted 
at the banquet ceremony. 

The committee is currently accepting 
volunteers to help plan and coordinate this 
year's event/Solicitation for sponsors and 
«. donations of Silent Auction raffle items Is also 
needed.. tM 

For information regarding golfing, din- 
ner, donations, or volunteering time call Tom 

Rogan at (414) 558-9914. 

There are remnants of snow still on the 
ground and there continues to be a chill in 
the air, but the Golf Outing Committee is al- 
. ready planning their 20th Annual Vista 
Star Hospice Golf Outing scheduled for 
summer 2001. 

Vista Star Hospice has served the needs 
of terminally ill patients and their families in 
this area for more than 20 years, regardless of 
their ability to pay for the services. Out hos- 
pital's mission has always been to promote 
f)ersonal and responsible choices for a health 
ifestyle effecting body, mind, spirit and to 

■pursue excellence in End of Life Care. Their 

ability to provide the finest service to their 
clients depends in part on the generosity of 
the community and other people who have 
made a commitment to helping others, par- 
ticularly those in need. 

They hope to make this year's event the 
most successful ever. That will be difficult be- 
cause last year's event raised over $50,000 for 
Hospice, a record for the new organization. 

This event will be held June 27 at Mid- 
lane Country Club In Waukegan. 

The Riverside Foudation's fifth an- 
nual golf outing will be held at Highland 
Park Country Club on June 5. 

Lunch will be at 11 a.m., followed by 
golf, which will be bestball format with a 
shotgun start. Awards presentation is sched- 
uled at 6 p.m. 

• The Riverside Foundation is a non-for- 
profit social service agency which provides 
residential and developmental training pro- 
grams to adults with developmental disabil- 
ities. 

■ 

Interested participants can contact 634- 
3973 for further details. 

The Lake County Forest Preserves' 
ThunderHawk Golf Club near Beach Park, 
will host the Chicago Regional qualifying 
round of the 2001 Jaguar CEO Tour. On Mon- 
day, May 21, at 10:30 a.m., 75 of the nation's 
top corporate executives will compete for the 
region's top spot. ThunderHawk was one of 
14 sites chosen across the country to host the 
prestigious tour. 

"We created the Jaguar CEO Tour to end 
the locker room bragging about who is the 
best golfer at the country club," said Michelle 
Cervantez, vice president of marketing for 
r Jaguar North America. "Along with allowing 
us to give amateurs the feel of being a PGA 
Tour professional for a day, we're able to 





learn more about certain types of customers. 
This event is a natural match to our XJ sedans 
and XK sports cars." 

The Jaguar CEO Tour is entering is third 
year and continues to grow, increasing from 
five qualifying events In 1999 to 13 In 2001. It 
Is one of the largest and most respected am- 
ateur golf events played. The Tour's compe- 
tition include Board Chairmen, CEOs, presi- 
dents or top executive officers. Entry in the 
tournament Is by Invitation only. 

Other scheduled stops for the Tour's 
qualifying rounds include courses In Arizona, 
Texas, Massachusetts, Florida, Illinois, Geor- 
gia, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Colorado and California. Regional winners 
will compete at the 2001 Jaguar CEO Tour 
Championship match held Sept. 10-20, at the 
Outrigger Wallca Resort in Maul, Hawaii. 

ThunderHawk Golf Club Is a champi- 
onship 10-hole public course designed by 
renowned golf course architect Robert Trent 
Jones Jr. Since opening in 1998 Thunder- 
Hawk has been hailed by Golf Magazine as 
one of the "Best Now Courses That You Can 
Actually Play." 

For more Information about Thunder- 
Hawk Golf Club contact Mary Longyhore at 
968-3229. For more Information about the 
Jaguar CEO Tour visit the Tour's official web 
site at www.JaguarCEOTour.com 

The Special Olympics of Illinois will 
be holding a golf outing May 16 at Village 
Green Golf Course In Mundeleln. The 
event, sponsored by the Mundeleln Police 
Department, costs $75 per golfer, which in- 
cludes golf, electric cart and lunch. For lunch 
only, the cost is $20 per person. Reservations 
and fees are due by May 9, so hurry - only the 
first 144 golfers can be accommodated. 
Reservations without payment can only be 
held for five days. 

Interested parties can submit names of 
golfers/lunch guests and check made 
payable to Mundeleln Police 
Department/Special Olympics to Cynthls 
Peart, c/o Mundeleln Police Department, 200 
N. Seymour Ave., Mundeleln, IL, 60060. You 
can also call 949-3258 for further informa- 
tion. 

Hole sponsorships are also available, 
starting at $100 per hole. 

Spring is Just around the corner and 
NISRA Foundation's annual golf outing 
is scheduled for Monday, May 21 at the Golf 
Club of Illinois. Take this opportunity to "give 
the gift of fun" to local children and adults 
with disabilities. Proceeds from the outing 
benefit Special Olympics and NISRA's Sum- 
mer Day Camp scholarship program. 

The day begins with a 7 a.m. buffet 
breakfast, followed by an 8 a.m. scramble 
format shotgun start. The outing will feature 
18 holes of golf with cart, special contests, 
prizes, raffle and a barbecue luncheon. Reg- 
ister now for early booking rates, at $120 per 
player by May 1, or inquire about special cor- 
porate packages. Anyone not playing in the 
outing who wishes to volunteer or make a 
contribution or for any additional informa- 
tion may call Ruth at (815) 459-0737. 

The NISRA Foundation is a not-for-prof- 
it charitable organization providing funding 
assistance for NISRA. NISRA provides year 
round recreation activities and Special 
Olympics for residents with disabilities in 
nine communities in McHenry County and 
parts of Lake and Kane Counties. 

Golfers can tee off at Turning Point's 

Second Annual Golf Gutlng to bo held Fri- 



day, Juno 1 at Oak Grove Golf Course In 
Alden. Tho day will begin with lunch at noon, 
followed by 18 holos of golf. The event Is a 
fund-raiser to support construction of Turn- 
ing Point's omorgoncy shelter for McHenry 
County victims of domestic violence. 

A golfor fee of $200 Includes lunch, golf, 
cart, cocktails and hors d'oouvres, gifts and 
prizes for winning groups. Golfers may sign 
up by contacting lodl Stevens at (815) 459- 
6340 or Turning Point at (815) 338-8081. 

Organizers are seeking ono additional 
corporate sponsor and sponsors for Individ- 
ual holes for this event. Contact lodl Stevens 
for more Information. 

In preparing to relocate the Illinois 
Golf Hall of Fame from It scurrent location 
at Ruffled Feathers Golf Club In Lemont to Its 
new home, The Glen Club In Glonvlew, tho 
Illinois PGA Foundation Is currently collect- 
ing memorabilia related to Illinois' rich golf 
tradition. Original prints or reproductions of 
historic photographs, newspaper articles, 
tournament programs, etc. are all welcome 
additions to tho Illinois Golf Hall of Fame. 

Parties interested in donating memora- 
bilia, reproducing memorabilia or making a 
nominations to the Illinois Golf Hall of Fame 
should contact tho Illinois PGA Foundation 

office at (630) 257-9600. ■) 

The 51 members of the Illinois Golf Hall 
of Fame Include Industry notables such as 
Charles Blair MacDonald, Chick Evans, Joe 
Jemsek, Jim Kemper, George S. May and Errie 
Ball, among many others. The Illinois Golf 
Hall of Fame Is scheduled to open in con- 
junction with the opening of The Glen Club 
in July of 2001. To loam more about the Illi- 
nois Golf Hall of Fame, visit tho Illinois PGA 
Foundation website at www.IPGA.com. 

The Special Olympics of Illinois will 
be holding a golf outing May 16 at Village 
Green Golf Course in Mundeleln. The 
event, sponsored by the Mundeleln Police 
Department, costs $75 per golfer, which in- 
cludes golf, electric cart and lunch. For lunch 
only, the cost is $20 per person. Reservations 
and fees are due by May 9, so huny - only the 
first 144 golfers can be accommodated. 
Reservations without payment can only be 

held for five daysMjBflMf"^^ 

Interested parties can submit names of 
golfers/lunch guests and check made 
payable to Mundeleln Police 
Department/Special Olympics to Cynthls 





Peart, c/o Mundololn Police Department, 200 
N. Seymour Ave., Mundeleln, IL, 60060. You 
can also call 949-3258 for further Informa- 
tion. 

Hole sponsorships are also available, 

starting at $100 per hole. 

And, Round Lake Area Park Dis- 
trict's Rcnwood Golf Course, located at 
1413 Halnesvlllo Rd. In Round Lake, opened 
their season March 28. Make your tee- times 
or plan reservations, group golf lessons, 
leagues and season passes by calling 546- 

8242. 

The driving range, located on Shore- 
wood Rd. between Halnsovlllo Rd. and Rto. 
83, Is opon March through Octobor, woath- 
or permitting. Also bo on tho lookout for 
Kenwood's now clubhouse, which will bo 
located by tho driving range. 
Lessons 

Tho Lake County Forest Preserves will 
offer lessons for junior golfers at Country- 
side Golf Club near Mundeleln and Thun- 
derHawk Golf Club near Beach Park start- 
ing In June. 

Tho Forest Preserves' Junior Golf Devel- 
opment Program Is a three-session golf 
learning program designed to Introduce 
youth, ages seven and over, to golf in a fun 
and informative way. Lessons begin June 13, 
Program Instruction Includes short game, 
long game and etiquette. Class size is limited 
to 18 students, guaranteeing personal atten- 
tion. Classes are offered from 8-9:30 a.m. or 
1-2:30 p.m. on Wednesdays at Countryside 
and on Thursday at ThunderHawk. 

Pre-reglstration and pre-payments are 
required. Program fee Is $75. Golf balls are 
provided, but participants need to bring a 
putter, a No. 3 wood and a No. 7 iron. For 
parents considering the purchase of clubs 
appropriate for their child's size and skill lev- 
el, a representative from La Jolla will be on 
hand the first day of tho program at both lo- 
cations to provide a free club fitting. 

Register in person at both golf clubs or 
by phono. Countryside Golf Club Is located 
on Hawley Rd., just west of Hwys. 60 and 83 
near Mundeleln. Phone: 566-5544. Thunder- 
Hawk Golf Club is located at on North Lewis 
Ave., just north of Wadsworth Rd near Beach 
Park. Phone: B72-HAWK. 

For more Information on tho Junior Golf 
Development Program or any Lake County 
Forest Preserve golf program, coll 968-3229. 




Nike New Golfer Day April 21 



Two Chicago-area Nike Golf Learning Cen- 
ters will provide new golfers with a fun intro- 
duction to the sport during New Golfer Day on 
Saturday, April 21, to men and women 18- 
years-and-oldcL The event will feature com- 
plimentary golf Instruction, etiquette and rules 
seminars, aa well as other exciting activities do- 
signed to moke golf enjoyable and user-friend- 
ly. Additionally, all participants will automati- 
cally be entered Into a Nike Golf New Golfor 
Sweepstakes, featuring a grand prize including 
complimentary golf Instruction, golf equip- 
ment and apparel, and rounds of golf. 

New Golfer Day will be held at American 
Golfs Fresh Meadow Golf Club in Hillside and 
Mill Creek Gorf Courses in Geneva. 

The Nike Golf Learning Centers offer a 
fresh new approach to conventional Insti 
tion by combining traditional golf fundamen 
tols with Instruction In such practical areas as 




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golf Jargon and terminology, proper etiquette, 
pace of play, how to operate a golf cart, now to 
reserve a tee time, and (most Importantly) how 
to transition from the practice range environ- 
ment to actually playing the course. 

'The Nike Golf Learning Centers' user- 
friendly format and funk Inviting atmosphere 
eliminate many of the barriers that have pre- 
vented peoplo from learning and enjoying golf 
in tho past," says Rhonda Moret, director of 
marketing for the Nike Golf Learning Centers. 
"Thousands of new golfers havo been intro- 
duced to tho game through this innovative for- 
mat, and more importantly, most of those new 
golfers havo become avid players," 

Pro-registration for New Golfer Day Is re- 
quired. To register or for more Information, call 
toll-free (877) 312-GOLF (4653). More Infor- 

on on Nike Golf can be found at 
www.nlkegolf.com. 












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SPORT 



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COLLEGE SPORTS REPORT 

AREA ATHLETES MAKING THE GRADE 




Augustana College 

Baseball 

Former Mundeleln Mustang and 
Grayslake native Tony Nelson belted a 
homer during the Vikings 19-3 drubbing over 
Elmhurst lost week. In action against Elmhurst 
the previous day, Nelson's sacrifice fly in the 
first inning tied the contest at 1-1 but Augie 
wound up falling 4 -3. 

Meanwhile, teammate and former Antlodi 
Sequolt Reggie walked and eventually scored 
on a fielder's choice during the Vikings' 6-4 loss 
to North Central. Currently, Nelson is batting .4 12 
with six doubles and 18 RBI while Hughes has 
two doubles and three RBI for the season. 



Elmhurst College 

Softball 

Vernon Mils' Jen Weller, a Stevenson 

grad, is a returning letter-winner for the Blue- 
jay women's softball team. In action last week, 
Weller scored off of a sacrifice fly but the Blue- 
jays fell to Manchester, 3-1. Weller also had an 
RBI bunt single as Elmhurst slipped past East- 




Jen Weller 



em Connecticut 
State, 3-2. In a 9-1 
victory over the 
Milwaukee School 
of Engineering, she 
went 2-for-3 with 
two runs scored. 

Weller, a 5- 
foot, 1 -inch sopho- 
more outfielder, is 
majoring in exer- 
cise science. 

Last season, 
Weller was named 

Rookie of The Year after batting 337. She is also 
a member of the Student Athletic Advisory 
Board and the mentoring program. 

A 1999 grad of Stevenson High, Weller 
earned all-conference, all-area and Big Gun 
MVP honors as a senior and all-conference and 
all-area honors in softball as a junior. 

Last season, the Bluejays were 24-15 over- 
all and 7-7 in the CCIW conference. The team 
was honored as an NFCA Division III All-Aca- 
demicTeam and ranked fifth in the nation with 






LOCAL SPORTS DIGEST 



The Great Lakes Adaptive Sports As- 
sociation (GLASA) has openings for their 
martial arts classes held on Wednesday 
evenings and adaptive aerobics classes, 
which are held on Monday's from 6:30-7:30 
p.m. at the Condell Intergenerational Gym- 
nasium, located at 700 Garfiels Ave. in Liber- 
tyville. 

Programs are for individuals who have 
mobility or visual impairment such as arthri- 
tis, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord Injuries and 
retintis pigmentosa. Family members, 
friends and other interested persons without 
disabilities are also invited to attend. Regis- 
tration for the classes is ongo 

. Call Cindy Housner at 283-0908 lor reg- 
istration and further inform a 

The Kenosha Youth Foundation will 

be holding the Big Al's Pizza/ KYF-Twin Lakes 
Branch Easter Run, Walk and Ifop ^Satur- 
day, April T4. -This community event has 
something for the entire family. Activities in 

elude a 5 kilometer run/ walk, half-mile Rab- 
bit Run (ages 5-10), 100-yard Bunny Hop Run 
(ages 4 and under) and an Easter costume 
contest. The site of the event is Lance Park lo- 
cated qn Lance Dr. (Hwy. O) in the Village of 
Twin Lakes.s| | 

Event times are 9 a.m. for the 5-kiiome- 

'walk and approximately 10:15 a.m. 

for the Rabbit Run and the 100-yard Bunny 

Hop Run. Race day registration begins at 8 

a.m. at the Lance Park Scout Building. 1 "" 

Entry fees are $13 pre-race and $16 race 
day for the 5 kilometer run/walk, $4 pre-race 
and $6 race day for the Rabbit Run, and $3 
pre-race and $5 race day for the Bunny Hop. 

Registration is being accepted at the 

Kenosha Youth Foundation (720 59th pi., 
Kenosha, Wis.) the Pringle Nature Center 
(9800 160th Ave., Bristol), online at www.ac- 
tive.com by mail or on race day. T-shirts and 
rabbit ears will be given to the first 150 en- 
trants. 

Sponsors for this event include the title 
sponsor, Big Al's Pizza, along with the 
Kenosha News, Snap-On, and Possibilities 
Unlimited. 

For more information or an entry form, 
call the KYF at (262) 654-7292, Ext 113. 

The Court Aces, Celeste Pregracke 
and Becky Gilford, will again be running a 
summer tennis league for singles and dou- 
bles players. 

The league is for any level of play from 
advanced beginner to the advanced player. 



run 



Players are put in a division with players of 
similar ability. 

All ages, including juniors are welcome 
to participate. The younger players, however, 
will be put into their own divisions. 

The cost Is $30 for one event and $25 for 
the second event Deadline for entries is May 1. 

Matches will start the end of May and 
finish very early in August. A round- 
robin/party will be held at me end of the sea- 
son. 

For more information or to receive an 
entry blank call Celeste at 662-5038 or Becky 
at 438-6830. 

Lady Wellness and NDE1TA, a non- 
profit fitness professional association are co- 
sponsoring the following nationally-recog- 
nized workshops: 
Aerobic Certification Workshop 

June 2-8 a.m. . ' ; 

Poten tial and current fitness instructors 
will learn basic academic and practical appli- 
cation of teaching group exercise. No college, 
science or teaching background required. 
Workshop registration includes a full-day re- 
view, written exam, two-year certificate and 
membership. 
Basic Ball Workshop 

June 3 -8 a.m. 

Learn the fundamentals of working on 
the Resist- A- Ball and build strength and flex- 
ibility, the workshop includes a variety of ex- 
ercises while challenging balance and coor- 
dination, the workshop is less comprehensive 
than the clinic while providing effective and 
safe exercises. 
Klcklt2-Beyond 
Basics workshop 

June 3 -noon 

Kick it up a notch with some fresh new 
ideas that can be incorporated in with your 
kickboxing basics. Explore ways to make your 
classes more challenging, fun and invigorat- 
ing. With the addition of drills, ropes, strikes 
and blocks you will experience a whole new 
world of kickboxing. 
Event location 

Lady Wellness, 2696 McFarland Rd., 
Rockford, IL Contact Shannon Kessler at 
(815) 654-8970. To register call (800) AERO- 
BIC (237) 6242. 

And, Vol Chi Chin students will meet 
for a free practice session from 2-4 p.m. Sat- 
urday, April 21 at the State Bank of The Lakes 
in Grayslake. Please call Donna McElhose at 
223-6065 for further details.-, 




Upcoming registration dates for the Lake 
Villa Township Football Program includes 

April 18 from6-8 p.m. and April 21 from9a.m.- 

12 noon. The registration fee is $95 for football, 
cheerleading and the pom squad. Note that 
mere will be a $ 1 refundable fee per family, re- 
turned after, volunteering for the concession 
stand, scoreboard, chalngang, etc There is also 
a $ 10 discount for each additional f am ily mem- 
ber 

The registrations will take place at the Lake 
VillaTownship Office Building (Caboose Park), lo- 
cated on Rte. 132 and Fairfield Rd. in Lake Villa. 

As of Nov. 6, 2001, eligibility requires the 
participant to be between, the ages of 8-14. At 



i 

the time of registration you will need to bring 
payment and a copy of your childls birth cer- 
tificate. Measurements for uniforms and 
equipment will also be taken at that time. Par- 
ticipants must attend registration. 

Cheerleading will have six squads, also 
starting with Bantam (7-8-year-olds) and end- 
ing with Pom Squads, for sixth through eighth- 
graders. 

The organization's first event of the year is 
Undenfest, where die cheerleaders perform. 
Interested coaches may contact Gary Cukla at 
265-1755 for more information. Interested in 
coaching cheerleading, please contact Alicea 
Morton at 356-8772. .. 



a combined GPA of 354. 

Weller is the daughter of Joyce Weller of 
Vernon Hills. 
Men's track 

Freshman John Hartmann (Island 
Lake, Wauconda U.S.) finished third in the 
high jump at the Wheaton College Invitation- 
al. As a team, the Bluejays finished fourth. 

North Central College 

Megan Thomas, an Ingleside native 
and Grant graduate, collected an RBI as the 
Cardinal women's softball team downed 
Elmhurst College, 5-1. For the season, Thomas 
is batting .403 with a homer, six triples, and 19 
RBI. As a team, the Cardinals are 24-2 overall, 
6-0 inthe CCIW. That includes a 22-game win- 
ning streak. 

William Penn University 

ormer Ubertyvllle grad Mike Os- 





mund had a run scored as the Statesmen 

the first game of a double header 8- 
5 to University of Dubuque. The Statesmen 
are currently 10-8 overall and 1-1 in the 
IIAC. Osmund then scored a run as the 
Statesmen picked up a 15-5 victory over 
Cornell College in the first game of a dou- 
bl encoder April 7. 

News and Notes 

A reminder that former Grayslake High 
standout tennis player Sarah Leslnskl will be 
officially inducted on to the Rams Wall of Fame 
May 23. Lesinski was a four-time conference 
champion at No. 1 singles. She was also a 
three-time state qualifier and picked up a sec- 
tional tide along the way. Lesinski then earned 
Junior College All-American honors in 1997 
while playing for The College of Lake County. 
She then went on to become Carthage Col- 
lege's first-ever No. 1 singles champion. 



Antioch Cheerleading registration set 



Antioch Cheerleading Association (ACA) Vikings football league as well as complete in 

has set their registration dates for Friday, April the TCYFL league cheerleading competition. 

27 from 6-8 p.m., Saturday, April 28 from 10 They have also sponsored and participated in 

a.m.-2 p.m., and Sunday, April 29th from 12 their own cheerleading competition for the 

noon-3 p.m. at St. Peter School in Antioch. last several years. The goal of the Antioch 

trough r " " J L ' 



iGirls entering kindergarten throu 
eighth-grade for the 2001-02 school year are 
eligible to register. The registration fee is $85 
with a $5 sibling discount. Please bring your 
child's birth certificate and insurance card to 
registration. 

Each cheerleader will be asked to sell one 
case of candy which will be handed out at 
registration. Additional candy may be sold to 
earn free cheerleading merchandise such as 
an ACA cheer jacket, ACA cheer sweatshirt, 
cheer t-shirts, shorts, etc. This merchandise 
will be on display and available for purchase 
during registration. 

ACA cheerleaders cheer for the Antioch 



Cheerleading Association is to provide a 
sound cheerleading program incorporating 
cheer, dance, stunting, jumps, and tumbling 
with serious focus on safety, sportsmanship 
and fun. 

ACA cheerleading squads earned several 
1st place honors for the 2000 season. Con- 
gratulations to the Varsity Squad who were 
second-place Grand Champions at the UPA 
AmeriCup Cheer & Dance Championship 
held at the Mall of America in Minnesota last 
month. 

For questions or additional information, 
please contact Margie Walsh-Griffin at 395- 
5961 or Cindy Albright at 395-2672. 







. 



T'Wolves registration April 18 







Up Some Fun! 



The Lake Villa T 



Township Baseball 

League has openings for umpires to 

call league games this summer. 

Eligible candidates can earn 

$25 to $30 per game and have some 















. 




. 



fun umpiring the games for kids, 
ages 9-12. If you're interested in taking 

advantage of this exciting 





opportunity, call the baseball office 

at (847) 508-0687 









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COMMUNITY 



April 13, 2001 



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2 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



April 13, 2001 



IV 



SPECIAL EVENT 



C elebration of Women 




LAKK- COUNTY CRISIS C B H T C R 



Friends of A Safe Place have announced their annual fashion show/luncheon, 
"A'Spring Celebration of Women," will take place Thursday, Apr. 26, at 1 1 
a.m. at the Knollwood Country Club In Lake Forest. The fund-raising arm of 
the Board of Directors of A Safe Place/Lake County Crisis Center, Friends of A 
Safe Place, raises funds to support the comprehensive shelter and counseling pro- 
grams of A Safe Place. 

The event will feature fashions from Fresh Ideas, Northfield; The Lake Forest 
Shop, Lake Forest; Robert Vance, Lincolnshire; Stagman, Glcncoc; and Furs by Vic- 
tor, Highland Park. Guest commentator is Cheryl Richter of Highland Park, a past re- 
cipient of the Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award who was involved with the 
development of the Pediatric AIDS Emergency Relief Association of Chicago. 

Featured speaker will be The Honorable Mary Seminara Schostok, former pre- 
siding judge in the domestic violence courtroom of Lake County, who has recently 
been elevated to a full circuit judge in the 19th Judicial Circuit of Lake and McHenry 
counties. 

■ 

Tickets for the spring event are $60. Tickets for an array of raffle prizes, including 
a guest tour of "All My Children" television studios and "Late Night with Co nart 
O'Brien" in New York, a week in a Beaver Creek, Colo, condo, golf foursomes 
throughout Lake County, and interest for a day on one million dollars. Raffle tickets 
are $5 each, 6 for $25 and 12 for $45. Winners need not be present to win. A silent 
auction will be held the day of the event. 

For more information, call A Safe Place at 249-5147. 

A Safe Place/ Lake County Crisis Center provides comprehensive services to sur- 
vivors of domestic abuse and their children. Last year the non-profit agency provid- 
ed more than 12,000 nights of emergency shelter and assisted victims of domestic vi- 
olence in obtaining nearly 2,000 orders of protection. Individual, group and chil- 
dren's counseling services were utilized by more than 3,300 Lake, McHenry and 
northern Cook county residents. In addition, 34 middle schools and high schools in 
Lake County provided students and educators with A Safe Place's prevention educa- 
tion programs on healthy relationships. 



Entries sought Junior Solar Sprint 



Teams of young engineers are needed to 
participate in the nth Annual Chicago Ju- 
nior Solar Sprint contest to be held Satur- 
day, May 12. 

Seventh and eighth grade science classes 
throughout the state of Illinois are invited to 
design, build, and race their solar-powered 
model cars in the contest sponsored by the 
U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne Nation- 
al Laboratory, and Case New Hollard Tech- 
nology Center. The race will be held at the 
1BEW-NECA Technical Institute, 6201 W, 115 
St. in Alsip, IL 

The Junior Solar Sprint is a national pro- 
gram developed to generate enthusiasm for 
renewable energy, to improve students" 
knowledge of these concepts and energy is- 
sues; and to encourage young people to con- 
sider technical careers. 

"The contest requires students to use 
aerodynamics, applied science and engineer- 
ing skills to meet technical challenges com- 
parable to those that scientists and engineers 
face," said Argonne's Christine McGhee. 

All participating teams will use a standard 
solar car kit consisting of a solar cell and mo- 
tor. Cars are restricted to about shoebox size 
and must be powered entirely by the sun. The 



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race will be run in heats until tho top-per* - ~ 
forming cars are determined. Each car will 
run in two to five heats depending on the 
number of entries, weather conditions, etc. 

Prizes will be awarded to top-performing 
cars. In addiu'on, design awards will be given 
based on technology, craftsmanship, appear- 
ance of the car and a working knowledge of 
the car's design. 

To register for the contest or for more in- 
formation, fax the school name, contact per- 
son, address and phone number to Christine 
McGhee at (630) 252-3443. McGhee can also 
be reached via e-mail at cmcghec@anl.gov or 
by phone at (630) 252-3175. 

The nation's first national laboratory, Ar- 
gonne National Laboratory supports basic 
and applied scientific research across a wide 

spectrum of disciplines, ranging from high- 
energy physics to climatology and biotech- 
nology. Since 1990, Argonne has worked with 
more than 600 companies and numerous 
federal agencies and other organizations to 
help advance America's scientific leadership 
and prepare the nation for the future. Ar- 
gonne is operated by the University of Chica- 
go as part of the U.S. Department of Energy 
national laboratory system. 

jgHraraEBHIflBHMEBHttftlBHa 



ented By 



G CHOICE VOUCHER PROGRAM 1 



H.UJ). 

HOUSING AUTHORITIES OF 

LAKE COUNTY, NORTH CHICAGO & WAUKEGAN 

AND 
FAIR HOUSING OF LAKE COUNTY 

Come out and meet representatives from H.U.D. , State and Local represen- 
tatives, community) agency representatives and current section 8 landlords! 

and 

■ 

Hear the latest news on the new section 8 housing choice voucher program! 

THE COUNTRY SQUIRE RESTAURANT 

19133 W. Betvldero Rd. 

Grays lake, IL 
Thursday May 3rd. 

8:30 A.M. - lO-.OO A.M. 



FREE 
BREAKFAST SERVED! 



PLEASE R.S.V.R 



Patricia Konlckl, Director Fair Housing of Lake County 

(847) 336-FAIR (3247) 
Fax your RSVP to 336-1435 bv A 



"EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY" 



DANCE 



Swing, tango and boogie 

"Dance With Us" Dance Club, will host a dance 
at the Waukcgan Park District's Bclvidcrc Recreation 
Center, 4 12 S. Lewis Ave. in Waukcgan, on Saturday, 
April 21. Dance lessons will be available from 6:30-7 
p.m. and dance instructors will be on hand all 
evening for consultation and help. The DJ will be 
spinning discs of swing, Latin, tango, boogie, and 
ballroom witli some mixers. 

A potluck dinner will be served and participants 
arc asked to bring a dish to serve 10 people. 

Admission is $5 and all dancers are welcome to 
attend. If you have questions, you may contact Dawn 
Wlltig at 244-7702 or Laura Osborne at the 
Waukcgan Park District, 360-4700. 

Spring serenade 

The Greater Fox Valley Chapter of US Amateur 
Ballroom Dancers Association will present a 
"Spring Serenade" da nee on Saturday, April 21 
from 8-1 1:30 p.m. at Old Townc Hall, 54 Brink St. 
In Crystal Lake. A fox trot lesson, door prizes and 
refreshments arc included in the admission of $7 
for members and $ 10 for non-members. 

Enjoy dance music from big band to present 
Including swing and latin tunes. Beginning and sin- 
. gle dancers are welcome: A cash bar will be avail- 
able in Uils no smoking facility. Dress code is casual 
to dressy, but no jeans or gym shoes please. USAB- 
DA Is a not for profit organization. Call Don at (815) 
356-1942, Bill at (815) 459-6870 or Jackie at 639- 
8699 for more information. 



WORKSHOPS 

How common is a name? 

The Burlington Genealogical Society will host a 
"presentation entitled "How Common are your An- 
cestral Surnames-Use the Answer to Simplify Inter- 
net Genealogical Research" at their next meeting 
on Wednesday, April 18. The meeting will begin at 7 
p.m. in the Historical Society Museum, comer of 
Perkins Blvd. and Jefferson St, In Burlington, Wis. 

Anyone interested in family research and ge- 
nealogy Is welcome to attend the meeting free of 
charge. For more information, call (262) 763-6981. 

Sharing experience 

Three prominent Chicago photographers will 
share their expertise with photography enthusiasts 
of all levels in a panel discussion and "walking 
workshop" on Saturday, April 21. The workshop is 
sponsored by the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation 
Trust and will be held at the Garfield Park Conser- 
vatory, 300 N. Central Park Ave. in Oak Park be- 

twecn 9 a.m. and 1230 p.m. 

The workshop fee is $75 for the general public 
and participants must beat Ieasrl7 years or age. 
Deadline for registration is April 13. Call (708) 848- 
1976 to enroll. 

Financial Workshop 

The Undenhurst Park District will sponsor a 
seven- week course, Financial Workshop for Indi- 
vidual Investors, beginning April 23. The Monday 
and Wednesday class, meeting from 6:30 p.m.-8:30 
p.m., will provide an In-depth look at the many dif- 
ferent types of Investments available for Individual 
investors who are working or retired. 

The workshop Is for adults,! 8 & over and will be 
held at 2236 E Grand Ave. in Undenhurst. Call 356- 
6011 for more information or to register. 



CLASSES 



Be a ham 

An eight-week ham radio class will begin on 
Wednesday, April 18 at the North brook Fire De- 
partment Administration Building, 740 Dundee Rd. 
In Northbrook. Learn all there Is to know about the 
world of ham radio. The class Is taught by a local 
volunteer amateur radio operator from the North 
Shore Radio Club. 

Pre- registration is not required and the class Is 
free. The test session will take place on Wednesday, 
June 6. For more information, visit www.ns9rc.org 
or call 295-8845. 



MUSIC 



New concert series 

The Ravlnia Festival has announced the debut 
of "Martinis at the Martin: The Great American 
Songbook," a new four-concert series to be held on 
Monday evenings, beginning June 1 1, The series 
celebrates American popular song In the intimate 
setting of Ravinla's acoustically acclaimed Martin 
Theater. The concerts will begin a 8 p.m. and will 
feature works by Harold Arlen, Irving Berlin, Duke 
Ellington, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter and more. 

For more Information on the concert series 



and tickets, call the box office at 266*5100 or visit 
the Festival web site at www.ravlnla.org. 

'Kitka' celebrates women 

Elgin Community College will host KItka, a 
unique women*s vocal ensemble that specializes In 
Eastern European music, at 8 p.m. on Friday, April 
20, In the I larry and Phyllis Blizzard Theater In the 
ECC Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1700 Spar- 
tan Dr. in Elgin. 

Using only their pure, unaccompanied voices, 
Kitka creates a constantly shifting landscape of 
sound, using material from ancient village duets to 
complex choral works. Tickets are $23 to $33 and 
are available by calling 622-0300. 

String quartet to perform 

The final concert In the inaugural season of 
"Music at St. James," a concert scries sponsored by 
St. lames Lutheran Church, 1380 N. Waukegan Rd. 
in Lake Forest, will be held Sunday, April 22 at 4 
p.m. The Bumhnm String Quartet is composed of 
Chicago Symphony artist and their program will in- 
clude Schunert's Quartcttsatz in C Minor, D. 703; 
Mendelssohn's Quartet No. I in E'Flat Major, Op. 
/2and Debussy's Ouartetin G Minor, Op. JO. 

Admission to the concert Is a suggested dona- 
tion of$10. For more Information, caff 234-4859, 

Beatle tribute 

American English, the Chicago-based Beatle 
tribute band will be performing at The Schact, 
20886 W. Park Ave. in Mundeicln on Saturday, April 
21 at 9:30 p.m. 

Sam Leach, the original Beatle promoter from 
Liverpool endorses American English as "the best 
Beatle band since the Beatles." Leach, the author of 
the book, "The Birth of the Beatles, will also be at- 
tending The Schact performance with celebrity ra- 
dio disc jockey Red Muldoon of 105.9 (WCKG) 
Breakfast with the Beatles, For more Information 
on the show, call 566-71 



in 



GOLF 



Tee time 

The Northbrook Park District announces per- 
manent tee time begins at Sportsman's Country 
Club, 3535 Dundee Rd. In Northbrook on Saturday, 
April 14. 

On Saturday, April 28, the Country dub will 
have a grand re-openlng of the driving range from 9 
a.m.-4 p.m. and offer free and reduced rate golf ac- 
tivities on the range. 

For additional information, call the Park District 
at 291-2980. 



FISHING 



Fishing guide 

The Lake County Forest Preserves offers a free 
fishing guide that profiles more than one-dozen 
Forest Preserves lakes and ponds with directions. 
The guide also gives detailed bottom maps and Il- 
lustrations of the fish to find. Information on ice 
fishing, creel limits, boat launches and wheel chair 
access points are Included. 

To obtain a guide, call the 24-hour automated 
hotline at 968-32 1 2 or visit the web site at 
www.coJake.lLus/forest. 

Castaway 

Aspiring fly anglers can take advantage of three 
opportunities to leam fly fishing skills this spring 

and summer at Trees for Tomorrow, the natural re- 
sources specialty school in Eagle River, Wis. 

Beginning Fly Tying will be offered oh April 21- 
22. The weekend course will include Instruction on 
correct tying technique, thread control and choos- 
ing materials. Cost is $130 and includes one night's 
lodging, four meals and instruction. An additional 
fee of $ 1 5 covers all hooks, thread, feathers and 
synthetics for the weekend. 

Two Fly Fishing School sessions will be offered 
June 1-3 and June 8-10. Participants will leam cast- 
ing, presentation, knot tying, tackle selection, ento- 
mology and angling strategies. 

For more informaUon, call (800) 838-9472. 



MEETINGS 



Adoption information 

Sunny Ridge Center, 2 South 426 Orchard RcL 
In Wheatbn will hold a China Adoption Orientation 
meeting on Tuesday, April 17 at 7 p.m. The free 
presentation will offer Introductory Information on 
adoptions from China, Including Information on 
the home study process, foster care licensing and 
cultural considerations. 

Sunny Ridge Family Center Is a child welfare 
agency licensed by the states of Illinois and Indi- 
ana to assist families with adoption. For more In- 
formation or to make a reservation for the meet- 



Continued on next page 




6409 Grand Ave,, D1 • Gurnee, IL 

847-856-8500 

www.hottanz.com 

Hours: Mon-Fii 9-8:30, Sat 9-5, Sun 10-3 

• Walktn's Welcome • Appointments Preferred 
. , , . We Also Carry: \ 

Indoor Tanning Lotions • Jnwlry • Bathing Suit! • After Tan Product! • Special fact Tanntn In Our lay Down Units • Outdoor SPft / 





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April 13, 2001 





Continued from the previous paw 

Ing, call (030) 080*5117. 

Calling woodcarvort 

Tho Carving Charocton Woodcnrvlng Club Ii 
looking for now mombon. If you nro a carvor or In- 
toreitod In lonrnlng how to enrvo wo would wol* 
comoyou to our mooting, 

Tno group mooti on tho Aral and third Tuoi* 
diyi of tho month nt tho Community ProtoitAnt 
Church, 410 N. Prolrlo ot tho comor of Hawloy and 
Pralrlo In Mundololn, from 1:30*4 p.m. Tho noxt 
mooting takoiplnco on April 17. 

Por moro Information ploaio call 023-2072. 

Women's Club meets 

This social organization Invttoi now and otuab- 
llihod Uko County womon roildonti to Join thorn 
for coffoo, moot nowpooplo and loarn about tho 
club'i numoroui actlvKlon Including golf, cardi, 
thoator and dining outing*, crafts, antiquos and 
book clubs, and couplo's ovonts. Mootlngs are hold 
tho socond Wodnoiuay of tho month (oxcopt July 
and Anoint), 10 a.m., at stoto Dank of tho Lakos In 
Oraysloko. Por moro Information, call 205-7434 or 
8S0'003B, 



BOOK REVIEW 




Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 3 





•M-MNMM 



.HI 




Willow Review 9 

Contributors to thoCollogoof Lako County's 
"Willow Itovlow" lltorary maga/Jno will present an 
ovonlng of poetry and fiction readings on April 10. 
Tho event will begin at 7 p.m. In room COM at 
CLC's Graysloko Campus. 

Ilto reading wlU celeb rale tho publication of tho 
2001 Usuo of tho -Willow Rovlow. Tho 20th edition of 

tho publication features poems and ihort Action writ- 
ton by moro than 38 writers. Tho reading Is (too and 
open to tho public Por Information, call S43 -2337. 




AUDITIONS 







■MM 



Summer show auditions 

On Saturday, April 2 1 , Dowon Park Theator will 
bo holding auditions for tholr 2001 Summer Shows 
for Young Audloncos. Interested actors should pre- 
pare a 1 -2 mlnuto monologuo from a young audi- 
once production and bo prepared to read. All 
shows are non ■ musical and thora Is pay. Auditions 
will begin nt 2 p.m. In the Jack Denny Contor for the 
Aits In Dowon Park, 30 Jack Bonny Dr. In 

Waukegan. 

Technical personnel are alio bolng sought. Po« 
sltlons lncludo a costumor and technical director to 
design and build sots. 

Por Information, coll 860-4741. Directions and 

additional Information can bo found at tho web il to 

by going to www.waukcganparks.org/jbc. 



KIDS STUFF 



'!».(.. ,. .'!«.. tl . 



iiiniiMMi.fi...,*!! im.ilMMiMillMIIIIMnMili 



Magic show 

A special after school performance featuring 
John Moainor and his magic show will tako place 
on Friday, April 20 through tho Gorton Community 
Center, 400 B. Illinois Rd. in Lako Porost at tho 
Daggett Auditorium. Tickets are S7 and tho show Is 
geared to kids In Kindergarten through sixth grado 
and tholr families. 

Moasner will perform feats of magic with Illu- 
sions nevor soon before. Participants should regis- 
ter and pay In advance by calling 234*0000. 

<Velveteon Rabbit 9 

Hio Papal Players of Palntlno will present tho "Vel- 
veteen Rabbit" In their In 1 1 mare theator, Cutting I fall, 
1 no n. Wood St. In Palatine, litis one hour springtime 
musical Is sure to enchant nil who attend. . 

Performances toko place on Wednesdays and 
Thursdays, April 13, 10 and 20 at 10 a.m. May per- 
formances will bo held on Friday, May 4 at 10 a.m. 
and Saturday, May S at 1 0:30 a.m. Tickets are SO In 
advance and $7 at tho door. To reserve tickets or for 
Information, call 389-0550, 

PI nocchlo plays 

"Plnocchlo," playing each Saturday at 10:30 
a.m. and 1 p.m. now through May 10, Is tho final 
production of tho year to bo presented by tho 

Northbrook Musical Theatre For Young Audience*, 
3323 Walter Ave. In Northbrook. 

Special "Whale of a Lunch" packages nro avail- 
able on April 20 and May 10 betweon shows. Tho 
package Includes a ticket to tho show, lunch. 
dessert, a prize and a visit from all of Plnoccnlo's 

friends while you oat. A lunch /theatre ticket is $10 

por person. Rooms are also avallablo before or after 
tho shows throughout tho run of tho production for 
parties or other celebrations. 

Northbrook Musical Theotro Por Young Audl- 
oncos Is a member of tho League of Chicago The- 
atres, For additional Information call 20 1-2307. 















"tennis camp 

Whether your child Is an avid player or a new- 
comer eager to loam, Summor J unlor Tonnii Camp 
at Northbrook Racquet Club Is a great way for kids 
to spend summers. Tho student to Instructor ratio 
Is low and In kooplng with tho spirit of tho loaion, 

tho focus In on run. 

Camp will bo hold Monday through Thursday 
at Glonbrook North High School from 9:30 a.m. to 

2:30 P.M., with tho noorby Northbrook Racquet 

Club courts avallablo for rainy day activities. £ 

81 For children going to traditional day compi, 

thora are still opportunities to play. Indoor camp Is 
hold on tho nlr-co ndl tlonod courts at Northbrook 

h Racquet Club, Monday • Thursday, 3 to S p.m. 
Flexible scheduling Is avmllablsr. Contact 
Northbrook Racquet Club at 408-2520 to enroll. 






CLC presents one-act plays 

wo American Absurdist Ono-Act Plavs will bo present- 
ed by tho Collego Of Lako County 1 ! thentro depart mont 
k Wando'i Vlslr by Chrlstophor Durang and "Zoo Sto- 
ry" by Edward Albeo will bo porformoefnt 7:30 p.m. 
April 13-14 and 10-21 In the Studio Theatre. An nftornoon 

performance will bo hold at 2 p.m. April 1 for senior citizens 
and studonti. 

Tho contemporary one • net ntayi emphasize tho unex- 
pected, absurd and sometimes brutal ways routine lives are In- 
terrupted by bizarre characters. In die 
play "Wanda's Visit," Wanda recounts a visit by an old 
high school sweetheart to tho home of a couple married 
for 13 years. "Zoo Story" Is sot In Contral Parte whore a 
man, who was sitting on a bonch and enjoying his quiet 
rending, Is Interrupted by an tin welcomed quest. 
Tickets nro $0 general public and $0 for.CLC students, 
alumni and seniors 05 and over. Call 543-23&0{or tickets. 






The Teflons offer an eclectic mix 



from 



Tho David Adler Cultural Center's Folk 
& lit hole Concert Series will present Tho 
Teflons on Saturday, April 2 1 at p.m. This 

female quartet otters powerful harmony 
and fim. From shape-note togos 

doo-wop to swing, Tho Teflons offer ai 
eclectic mix of Instrumental and exciting a 

cappella pieces. 

Each member brings stylo and strength 
to The Toflons' performances, which fea- 
ture Barbara SUvorman'a swing guitar and 
bluesy vocals, Valorlo Mlndol'i fiery fiddle 
and old • time harmonies, the clear voice 
and ukulolo styllngs of Gall Tyler, and Pa- 
tricia Ohanlan I.unds trom's thumping bass 
and country yodel. Throw In so mo piano,, 
mandolin and tho'occaslonal washboard 
solo and you get the unique blend of old 
and now that makes this entertaining 
quartet one of the most sought after good- 



time bands In tho Midwest 

Tickets can be purchased at the door or In advance at the David Adler Cultural 
Center, 1 700 N. Milwaukee Ave. In UbortyvUlo, or by phono by calling 367-0707. 






Tho Teflons will opj 

Adler Cultural Center on Saturday, 

April 21. Call 367-0707 for tickets 

and Information. 




■*#■ 



* 



• • 













Thousands of Civil War Itoms and othor 
American military momorabllla.wlll bo dis- 
played and sold on Saturday, April 21 during 
tho 20th Mldwost Civil War Collectors Show 

In Whoaton. 

Moro than 250 antique doalors from coast 
to coast will foaturo military Items from tho 
Revolutionary War In 1776 through tho Indi- 
an Wars of 1898. 

The show will bo hold from 8:30 a.m. to 



4:30 p.m. at the DuPago County Fairgrounds, 
locatod at 2015 Manchester Rd. In Whoaton, 
just 35 minutes west of Chicago. 

General admission Is $5 por person. Chil- 
dren under 12 years of ago will be admlttod 
for froo. Living history people and nonac- 
tions ore oncourogdd to attend In uniform* 
and period costumes. 

For more Information about tho show 
contact Dob Nowak at (608) 884-3237. 




Political Satirist Mark Russell returns 




ho wildly popular political satirist from 
Washington, D.C., Mark Russoll will 
perform at Centre Bast Saturday, April 
21 at 8 p.m. Known as tho "political pi 
his facial oxprosslons and Impeccable 
timing echo tho tono of current-day politics. 
Mark Russoll will perform ot tho Centro East 
Theatre In tho North Shore Contor for tho Per- 
forming Artiln Skoklo, 0501 Skoklo Blvd. 

IV Gulch called Russoll, "the funniest man 
on television/' Russoll Is currently celebrating 
his 25th season on PBS with "The Mark Russoll 
Comody Specials/' which havo consistently 
placed among tho flvo-top rated show on that . 
network. Ho has also beon a weekly commen- 
tator o CNN's "Inside Politics Weekend" and a 
former co-host of NBC's "Real People," Russel- 
l's column, syndicated by tho LoiAtigohs 
Ttnws appears In moro than 100 papers across 

the United States. 

Russoll found himself starting his career In 
tho bars of Washington, D.C. In the 1050s. 
Around the time that the New Frontier was In- 
vading Washington, Russoll Invaded Washing- 
ton's Shoroham Hotel for a risky tvyo-week gig, 
which ended up lasting 20 years form 1059 to 
1070. Next, Russoll began performing at tho 
Marquee Lounge whore politicians would 

Sather at tho end of tho day. Ho works live, 
•osh and topical, performing stand-up come- 
dy while accompanying himself on the piano. 



Acoustic guitar workshop 

with Christopher Shaw to be held 







As a descendant of steamboat pilots, 
"pathfinders," and other rustic archetypes of 
the Adirondack region of New York, singer, 
songwriter, storyteller, and noo-tradltlonal 
acoustic guitarist Chrlstophor Shaw Is 
stooped In tho loro of the American North- 
east. Shaw has done some steamboat piloting 
of his own, but It Is In his professional role as 
a recording artist/performer that ho carries 
forward tho tradition of the groat trouba- 
dour/storytellers who havo enlivened parlors, 
taverns, and roadsides since America's colo- 
nial ora. 

Shaw travels thousands of miles a year to 
perform for a faithful and over-growing fol- 
lowing, and has boon enthusiastically re- 
ceived by European audloncos as an ambas- 
sador of traditional Amorlcan music. He'll bo 
hosting an acoustic guitar workshop Wednes- 
day, April 18, 7 p.m. at Grand Music & Sound, 



780 Frontage Rd, In Northfleld. The session 
covert self-accompaniment for vocalists, uso 
of alternate tunings, performance and equip- 
ment tips and moro. 

Shaw has seven albums to his credit, In- 
cluding his 1988 debut, Adirondack, which Is 
entered In the Library of Congress Polk 
Afchlvos. Performers on Show's recordings 
have Included such acoustic Innovators as 
Artie Traum, John Sebastian, Garth Hudson 
(Tho Band), Vassar Clements, Cindy Cashdol- 
lar, Tony Trlshcka, and lay Ungar. Shaw col- 
laborated with his wife, slnaer-songwrtter 
H ridge t Ball, on his latest effort, "Songs from 
the Big Porch,..A Celebration of Amorlcan 
Folk Music," an album that pays homage to 
America's rich heritage of traditional music. 

Admission for the workshop Is freo and 
participants should bring their guitars. For 
more Information, please call 448-4283. 



■ 



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4 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



April 13 f 2001 



4 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries- March 21 /April 20 
A co-worker tries to help you with a prob- 
lem, but creates confusion instead. Don't 
get frustrated; It won't help the situation. 
Just work together to resolve the problem. 
Love Is in the air at the end of the week. A 
friend of a friend reveals his or her true feel- 
ings for you. Scorpio plays an important 
role. 

Taurus-April 21/May 21 
Your tendency to keep quiet pays off in the 
beginning of the week. A close friend needs 
to talk and reveals personal information. 
Your confidence will be appreciated. When 
it comes to romance, you'll have to make a 
decision. Think about where you stand in 
that special relationship and where you 
want to end up. 
Gemini - May 22/June 21 
Be patient at work this week. While your 
boss may seem too conservative for you, he 
or she really has your best interest at heart. 
You need to lookout for yourself when it 
comes to your personal life. It will feel like 
everyone is against you. Be cautious when 
making decisions. 
Cancer - June 22/July 22 
Don't be the first to volunteer for a new pro- 
ject at work. Wait to see everything that's in- 
volved, because it may be more than you've 
bargained for. However, you should take a 
chance when it comes to romance this 
week. Don't wait for that intriguing person 
to ask you out. Make the first move. 
Leo - July 23/August 23 
Your sympathetic side will be called on early 
in the week. A loved one needs you to listen 
and give moral support. Be honest, but car- 
ing. Give in to your desires, and shower 
yourself in luxury this weekend. It's going to 
be a hectic week at work, so you deserve to 
pamper yourself. 
Virgo -Aug 24 /Sept 22 
While you usually like to be alone, working 
as a team at work this week will make things 
so much easier. You'll share a lot of good 
ideas and actually make some close friends. 
Loved ones will rely on you to take care of a 
family matter. Aquarius is involved. 



Llbra-Sept23/Oct23 
Seek harmony in the workplace this week. 
Don't become involved in an office dis- 
agreement. Family matters become hectic 
this week. Loved ones will look to you for 
advice and support. Take a deep breath. 
You'll be able to help everyone out and still 
have time for yourself. 
Scorpio - Oct 24 /Nov 22 
Follow your instincts in the business world 
this week. It's your nature to tell the truth, 
so stick to it. Don't be tempted to embellish; 
it will backfire. Love takes center stage as 
the week draws to a close. An old friend will 
resurface and want to begin a relationship. 
Follow your heart. 
Sagittarius T Nov 23/Dec 21 
Be frank when a close friend asks for your 
opinion. While the truth may not be what he 
or she wants to hear, it's what he or she 
needs to hear. Your romantic life slows 
down this week, but don't get discouraged. 
This break will give you time to relax and fo- 
cus on yourself for a change. 
Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Now's your chance to shine at work. 
You'll be given the opportunity to lead a 
new project; your intelligence and effi- 
ciency will shine through. Don't be shy 
when it comes to meeting new people this 
week. Your sweet, sensitive side will en- 
dear you to someone with a lot of connec- 
tions. 

Aquarius- Jan 21/Feb 18 
Let your practical side lead you in your deci- 
sion making as the week begins. While it 
may seem like a good idea to make an im- 
pulsive purchase at first, don't do it. Fi- 
nances will be tight by the week's end. A re- 
lationship will move into high gear when 
you realize how much you have in common 
with that special someone. 
Pisces- Feb 19/March 20 
Slow down this week, because it will feel as 
if your entire world is closing in on you. A 
few days off of work will help you relax, and 
time with loved ones will show you that 
you're still in control of your life. Virgo and 
Sagittarius play important roles. 




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Register now for the Annual Prairie Pedal 

* 

The LibertyPrairic Conservancy will hold Its 5th Annual Prairie 
Pedal bike ride'on Sunday, May 6 at Byron Colby Barn, Prairie 
Crossing in Grayslake, For the more serious bike rider, choose from 
a 35-or 55-mile course, with the 35-mile route visiting the Volo Bog 
State Natural Area. A 12-mile ride will take participants through 
Grayslake and the family ride is a 5-mlIe route on protected nature 
trails. All rides include rest stops and the opportunity to enjoy 
spring scenes of Lake County. All rides start and finish at Byron 
Colby barn in Prairie Crossing, Rte, 45, just sou|h of Rte. 120 in 
Grayslake and will be held rain or shine. 

After the ride, feast on a pasta lunch and Ice cream back at the 
barn beginning at 1 1 a.m. There Will be complimentary massages, 
face painting, farm animals, environmental games and a native 
plant sale of prairie flowers and grasses. 

The road ride registration takes place from 6:30-9 a.m. and cost 
is $22 with a free t-shirt for those who register by April 21. Family 
ride registration begins at 10 a.m. 
and cost is $7 per participant 
with children under age 4 riding free. 

All proceeds go to support trail development and 
open space protection In the Liberty Prairie Reserve. 
The Reserve is a 2,500-acre open space sanctuary lo- 
cated in Lake County, one of the fastest growing 
regions in northeastern Illinois. The Liberty 
Prairie Conservancy is the ears, eyes and voice 
of the Liberty Prairie Reserve. The Conservan- 
cy's accomplishments in land conservation, 
environmental education, and trail devel- 
opment are made possible by the contin- 
ued support and generosity of many 
people. 

For additional information, call 622- 
4100 ore-mall the Liberty Prairie Con- 
servancy at prairiepedal@liber- 
typrairic.org. 





FROM PAGE LAKELIFE 1 



CITIZENSHIP 




It took him over three months before he 
was able to help 15 people become U.S. Citi- 
zens. 

Pena came up with a plan and by 1996 
was able to get the INS to come and start giv- 
ing interviews in Waukegan. 

Pena also began visiting churches in 
Highwood and Round Lake (St. Joseph) every 
Sunday to help people. Around that time, 
Pena said, "I listened to all of the problems 
that the people had, not just immigration 
problems. I felt compassion for them and 
started taking courses on counseling others. 
My favorite was the 'Power of Positive Listen- 
ing.' I have found it very rewarding to help 
people overcome their problems." 

And Pena has helped a lot of people over- 
come their problems. 

In fact, and incredibly, Pena has helped 
over 3,000 people to become U.S. citizens. 
These include people from Round Lake, 
Mundelein, Gurnee, Grayslake, Waucond a, 
Lake Villa, Undenhurst and other towns in 
Lake County. 

And these people have not all been from 
Mexico. 

Pena has helped people from 39 coun- 
tries, including Japan, China, Finland, Cana- 
da, England, India, South Korea, the Philip- 
pines and every country in Central and South 
America. 

u l have helped people from just about any 
country that you can think of," said Pena. 

In addition "Mr. Citizenship", (which 
people are starting to call him) helps resi- 
dents to replace lost green cards. 

One of Pena's favorite stories about help- 
ing others is the time a lady called him, and 
she was very upset It seemed a car dealer had 
done her wrong and would not fix her car. 
Perez said he called the dealership and within 
a week the situation was remedied. 

In the last year, Pena became Interested 
in politics. Trustee Lucy Rios ran for City 
Clerk and lost. It was then that Pena decided 
to run for her trustee seat. 

He won. 

Pena was elected on the same ticket with 
Township Supervisor Patricia Jones, Town- 
ship Clerk Mark Strickland and Tax Assessor 
Pat Morris. 

Pena said, "This is my first time being 

elected to public office and it is definitely 

something new. It will be a learning experi- 
ence for me," « 

Pena commented, "I want to learn more 
about how the system works. I want to help 

the community and help build a bridge for 
our young people." 

Pena has worked at Abbott Laboratories , 
since March 16, 1973. He has worked his way 
up to senior mechanic, 

According to Pena, there are 92,000 Span- 




Waukegan Township Trustee-elect 
Mario Pena is known in the area as "Mr. 
Citizenship," helping immigrants be- 
come United States citizens. — Photos 
by Sandy Bressner 



ish-speaking people in Lake County. He says 
that 53 percent of students in Waukegan 
schools and 40 percent In Round Lake 
schools axe Hispanic. 

Census Bureau documents indicate 
that 35.3 millions people Identified them- 
selves as Hispanic during last years census. 
That is an increase of 58 percent from the 
22.4 million from the 1990 census. 

. Because of the economic boom, north- 
eastern Illinois has increased its population 
by 830,000 since 1990. Close to 69 percent of 
these new residents were Hispanic 

"Mr, Citizenship" wants to help as many 
people as he can to become citizens to enjoy 
all the privileges in this country. He never 
charges any money for his services and even 
refuses the money when offered to him, 

Mr, Mario Pena is not only living the 
American Dream, he is helping others to do 
so and is a good example for everyone. He 
came to this country to make a better life for 
himself, but little did he realize what a differ- 
ence he would make in the lives of others. ' 

For more information on how to become 
a citizen, call Mr. Pena at 847-336-8108. 



II 



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April 13, 2001 



Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 5 




Excerpts from 'Bridget Jones 



9 




movie review 

BBMORBBBaa 




H" aving read Helen Field- 
er's novel "Bridget Jones' 
Diary" nearly three years 
Jl ago, I was excited when I 

heard Rende Zellweger would be 
taking the helm as Jones in the 
movie adaptation. Like many critics, 
I like Zellweger a great deal, but was 
concerned whether she could em- 
body the spastic energy of the 
British character. 

The movie begins with the char- 
acter at her parent's home around 
New Year's for their annual turkey 

curry buffet extravaganza Jones, a 

self-described "singleton," has 
made a variety of New Year's resolu- 
tions which include giving up smok- 
ing, cutting back on drinking, losing 
weight and giving up on men that 
are bad for her. 

At the turkey buffet, Jones' par- 
ents, the "smug marrieds" as she de- 
scribes them, are working on fixing 
their daughter up with a newly di- 
vorced young man named Mark Dar- 
cy, played flawlessly by Colin Firth. 

Conversation ensues between 
the two, harsh words are exchanged 
and the day ends on a low note for 
Jones. 

Comparisons of Jones to the 
American single woman stereo 
of "Ally McBeaT are inevitable. Un 
like McBeal, Jones does struggle 
with her weight and is not near 




Helen Marisfield 



The stars of 'Bridget Jones' attend the movie's premiere. They 
are, from left, Colin Firth, Ren6e Zellweger and Hugh Grant. 



BRIDGET JONES 

DIARY 



Rating 

R 

Director 

Sharon Maguire 
Starring 

Renee Zellweger. 
Hugh Grant 
Colin Firth 




nearly as 




polished as McBeal. She works in a 
publishing house, but only as an 
over-rated secretary. 

Jones develops an unhealthy 
flirtation with her boss, played by 
Hugh Grant, which she believes will 
blossom into something perma- 
nent. Through happenstance, Mr. 
Darcy shows up at nearly every in- 



tersection in the movie, making 
Jones wonder if maybe HE is the 
one she's suppose to be with. 

I have to admit, this is a "chick 
flick." There is a pretty good fight 
scene between Jones' two suitors, 
but die action isn't enough to keep 
most men interested in the film. All 
three characters were played ex- 
tremely well by their corresponding 
actors, Zellweger achieving fantas- 
tic British accent 

I am a big fan of Grant of "Four 
Weddings and a Funeral* and "Not- 
dng Hill" fame, though his charac- 
ter in "Jones" is a little seedier and 
darker than most folks are used to. 
Firth 1 have adored since I saw him 
in "Pride and Prejudice." "Jones" 
for him is a departure as he plays 
more of a haphazard romantic lead 
as opposed to his usual villainous 
character in such films as "Circle of 
Friends" and "Shakespeare in 
Love." 

I don't usually like chick flicks, 
but this one is pretty good. For the 
girls only. 




'Ring Lear' reigns supreme at Shakespeare Chicago 









r 



Chicago Shakespeare The- 
ater's reprise of "King 
Lear" comes only after an 
eight-year interval. How- 
ever, the time Is ripe. 

Director Barbara Gaines has 
cast in the Ude role Greg Vinkler' 
for what is now his 20th appear- 
ance with the company. And the 
new theater facility at Navy Pier al- 
lows more elbow room for the 26- 
member cast as well as an oppor- 
tunity to exercise some ingenious 
technical feats. 

Vinkler brings all his dynamic 
talents to the fore as Lear, an aging 
15th Century English monarch 
who foolishly decides to break up 
his kingdom and give it to his 
three daughters - determined by 
the love each professes. But he's 
bamboozled by Goneril and Re- 
gan, who lavish heaps of praise on 
their father but false affection. His 
favorite child, young Cordelia, is 
having none of this; she avows her 
love but won't get into a contest 
with her siblings simply to gratify 
Lear. 

Enmity ensues. Cordelia is £ 
hastily wed to the King of France 
and in no time the falseness of her 
sisters' love becomes manifest 
Lear and his personal retinue of 
soldiers finds themselves rejected 
at the hands of Goneril and Regan. 
Cold, comfortless and alone in a 
storm, Lear quickly finds himself 

raging at his folly. 

An intriguing subplot involves 

another decepUon of the Eari of 
Gloucester. His bastard son Ed- 
mund convinces his father that 
Gloucester's eldest son and heir, 
Edgar, is plotting the father's 
death. Disguised as a homeless 
madman, Edgar eventually res- 
cues Gloucester, who has been 



blinded for supporting Lear. 

"King Lear" is a tragedy. When 
the pieces come together by the fi- 
nal curtain, don't expect for a hap- 
py resolution. 

While Vinkler delivers a pas- 
sionate Lear, no less admirable are 
the efforts of Lisa Dodson as 
Goneril, Celeste Williams as Regan 
and Ana Sferruzza as Cordelia. 
Patrick Clear, as Gloucester, does 
his usual fine job and Scott Parkin- 
son shines as the Fool. 

The special effects, including 
lighting, thunder and a drenching 
rain, create a realistically fearsome 



tlEGAL 



storm on a desolate heath. 

See mis outstanding produc- 
tion through April 22. Ticket infor 
mation is available at (312) 595- 
5600.— By Tom Witom 



CLASSICS CINEMA 



Children 
Mitiftcu 




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SOMEONE UKf YOU (PG-13) 112:15 235 455) 7:1$ MS 

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CROUCHING TiaCfl(Pa-13) (1125 155 425) 700 935 



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WHERE MOVIE GOING IS FUN AND AFfORDAOLE 



sentation of local 
resident, Holocaust life 




Movie arranged by Stephen Spielbe 





The young life of Henri Hanau 
during the German-created Holo- 
caust will be told in a nearly two- 
hour movie arranged by Stephen 
Spielberg. 

Hanau, who died last year at 
the age of 76, was a long-time 
Waukegan and Libertyville busi- 
nessman. He 
owned Henri's, a 
deli and kosher 

food store 

Waukegan arid the 

Town Market in 

Libertyville. His 

widow, Alice, who 

owns the Triangle 

Travel & Tours 

agency in 

Waukegan, also was a survivor. She 

survived die Nazi killings by living 

in a convent during World War II. 

Waukegan policeman Steve 
Jones will introduce the program 
and make some remarks. Jones is a 
recognized authority on the Holo- 
caust and lectures nationwide on 
this subject 

The event will take place at 3 
p.m. on Sunday, April 29, at Con- 
gregation Am Echod, 1500 Sunset 
Ave., Waukegan. There is no charge. 
The public is invited. 

' Hanau at die age of 15 in 1938 
was taken for safety to France by his 
mother and left there. This followed 
the German invasion of Jewish 



'Henri was thought 
of as a hero but he 



homes when the men were taken to 
prison and Jewish property was de- 
stroyed. Hanau, an apprentice at 
that young age, was senthome 
from work that day where the Ger- 
mans saw and beat him. 

He spent the following years in 
the French underground and in the 

French Foreign Le- 
gion fighting the 



never thought of 
himself that way* 



Alice Hanau 



Germans who mur- 
dered 26 of his rela- 
tives that included 
his parents. 

Hanau was hon- 
ored with a dinner 
and ceremonies that 
included an orches- 
tra in the village of 
Mazerolles, France, located near 
the larger community of Besancon. 

Victory Hospital personnel 
also recognized Hanau in a 
memorial for his many volunteer 
contributions. Alice Hanau said 
•"They recognized him and hon- 
ored me." The only previous 
showing of the movie was at this 
event Hanau also taught literacy 
to prisoners in the Lake County 
Jail and made many other contri- 
butions to the community. 

His widow said "Henri was 
thought of as a hero but he never 
thought of himself that way." 

Am Echod has facilities in 
Waukegan and Lindenhurst . 






. 



Are You Looking For Something To Do? 

See this section EVERY WEEK 





Show PL ace 8 

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[12:30] [1:10] [3:40] [4:30] 
6:50 8:00 10:00 

HANNIBAL (R) 

[12:45] [3:50] 7:00 10:05 

SAVING SILVERMAN (PG-13) 
[1:40] [4:40] 7:40 10:15 




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THE WEDDING PLANNER (PG-13) 



[1:30] [4:20] 7:20 9:40 



MISS. CONGENIALITY PG-13) 
[120] [4:15] 7:30 10:20 






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LIBERTY IH47) 362-1011 

m;, \ Mih\ ff iiiktV V. I I ilt<r!\ s, i'Ii 



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MX SHOWS MfOtf SfM 

SAM ADUIT ADMISSION ATI IK SPM 

Spy Kids (re* 

Fri.-Sun. 2:15,4:30,6:30, 8:30; 
Mon.-Thurs. 6^0, 8:30 






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Sat. 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 

Sun. 2:30, 4:30, 7:00 

Mon.-Thurs. 7:00 



Fri-Sun. 2:00, 4:00, 
Mon-.Thu«. 6AS 

Heart Breakers 

(PGI3) 

Fri.-Sun. 6;1 5,8:45; 
Mon.-Thurs. 8:45 



• • • 











6 LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



April 13 , 2001 



\ 






I 




Catch the color at the Chicago Botanic Garden as more than one million flowers burst into bloom during the "Spring- 
Blooms" festival April 20 to June 3. This six-week celebration of spring features guided walking and tram tours, con 
certs, family activities and 385 acres of spring flowers. 






■ 



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• V 



• etuming for its second year, the Ghicago Botanic Garden's 



Antiques and Garden Fair-The Finest Styles for Garden Liv- 
ing, will be expanded toieatiirelipproximately 100 dealers, 
making it the Midwest'sjjargest garden antiques fair. Most 






will be selling garden antiques complemented by vendors with fine 
gardening accessories and specialty plants in a creatively designed 
garden setting under tented pavilions. 






I 



The Fair will include lectures on the 
most current home and garden design styles 
by Carol Roehm, author of a series of sea- 
sonal notebooks titled Tall," "Winter," : 



• M 



Spring" and "Summer," Michael Boodro, . 

Garden Design" editor; and Mary Brawley 
Hill, writer of "Furnishing the Old Fash- 
ioned Garden." Lectures are $15. 



Y 



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»- . 



MICHELLE KWAN 
BRIAN BOITANO 



t 




VICTOR PETRENKO 

ELVIS 
STOJKO 








NEWSPAPERS 



IS SENDING 

8 LUCKY 

WINNERS 




Chicago's own Nancy 
McLivaine of Portals Ltd. and 
floral designer Virginia Wolff, 
as well as Garden horticultur- 
alists, will be giving free 
demonstrations. 

Admission to the Fair is 
$15; $12 in advance; $10 for 
members in advance. The 
Fair will be open on Friday • 
and Saturday, April 20 and 
21 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on Sunday, 
April 22 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 










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newspapers congratulate the 
winners of the popular 'Tuesday w/Mitch 
Contest & thank the many who entered. 



* 



1ST PLACE • KEVIN M00NEY - LIBERTYVILLE 



5T„ 






2 Free Tickets/ Autographed Book 




2ND PLACE • HAZEL DAYERFISH 

2 Free Tickets 

3RD PLACE • CHRISTINE 

Autographed Boo, 



MCHENRY 



MUND 



I 



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* 






Don't Forget Mitch Albom, "Tues. w/Morrie" 



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1st Place • Four tickets 

- 

Two Tickets 



3rd Place 



Two Tickets 



Champions On Ice 

Sal" Apr. 21 st, 8 p.m. United Center 




3 



Send Your Name, Address & 
Phone Number and why you'd 



* ■ 



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like to qo to: 




V 






NEWSPAPERS 
CHAMPIONS ON ICE 



I 



30 S. Whitney Grayslake, IL 60030 



• All entries Must 

Be Received By 

April 16 
• Winners Must 

Come To 

Lakeland 

Headquarters to 

Pick Up Tickets 






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My friend had his birthday 
_ at Party & Play. 
Then Mom took me back just to play. 
I got to dress up, sing, and play - 

really fun? 



\2 Theme Areas In AM! 






I: 






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Visit our new website: www.PartyorPlay.com 




. I 



' i ■ 







• » 




2001 



April 13, 2001 



Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 7 



--1 




Tlguak (left) and Eddy, one-year-old polar bears at Brookfield Zoo. 




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Brookfield Zoo has two exciting an- 
nouncements about its polar bears. 
First, Tiguak* a female hand-reared 
polar bear was successfully intro- 
duced to Eddy, a male polar bear on loan 
from Jar din Zoologique du Quebec, Canada. 
They can be seen on exhibit in the zoo's Bear 
Grottos. Secondly, Arid, Hguak's mother, - 
gave birth to a cub on Dec 2, 2000. The two 

made their public debut on April 12. 

j start of spring, comes a new be- 
promising future for both Tiguak 
leuak was bom on Oct 1999, 





reasons uhknownto zoo staff, 



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caresheneed 
days-old, staff intervened and 
began the long and dedicated process of 
hand rearing the vuln 
growth and develops 

animal collection staff started search- 
pa nion bear for her. Since she 
was hand reared, it was evident that Tlguak 
needed to socialize with another young bear 
to encourage and help her further her devel- 
opment as a polar bear. Around the same 
time, the Jardin Zoo began planning renova- 
tions and needed to find temporary homes 
for its polar bears. Eddy, born in Dec. 1999, 
seemed to be the perfect match forTiguak, 
since his transfer to Brookfield Zoo would 
benefit both cubs. 

Eddy arrived at Brookfield this past win- 
ter. Since his public debut in Jan. 2001, zoo 
guests and staff have enjoyed watching him 
play in his new home, but more importantly, 
all have been anxiously waiting the day he an 
Tiguak would be together. The introduction 
process between the two 300-pound yearlings 
has taken about two months. At first, they 
were in separate grottos adjacent to one an- 



other. After about a week, they were rotated 
into opposite grottos for about the same 
amount of time. This gave the bears an op- 
portunity to become accustomed to each ot 
e^s scent and familiar with the habitat the/ 
be sharing. Finally, the polar bear cubs met 
face to face. 

It is hoped that Tiguak and Eddy will coi 
tinue their companionship, and eventually - 
when they reach sexual maturity, at around I 
years of age — successfully participate In the 
North American polar bear breeding pro- 
gram. 

At birth, polar bear cubs weigh aooroxi- 
matelv 1 -5 pounds and measure 

^^_ sex, 

will weigh between 660 1 

fully grown.) Polar bears 

deaf and are basically helpless for the first 

month, spending all of their time. __ 

sleeping. They begin eating sojid foods at * - 

about 3 months of age, and may continue to 

nurse for more than a year. 

Brbokfield Zoo is known throughout the 
world for its innovative, naturalistic, multi- 
species exhibits, and its international role 
in animal population management and 
wildlife conservation. The zoo is devoted to 
helping people develop a sustainable and 
harmonious relationship with nature. Open 
every day of the year, Brookfield Zoo is lo- 
cated at First Ave. and 31st St. in Brook- 
field. The zoo is accessible via the Steven-, 
son (1-55) and Eisenhower (1-290) express- 
ways, the Tri-State Tollway (1-294), Burling- 
ton Northern commuter line, and PACE bus 
service. * 

For more information about Brookfield 
Zoo, visit its web site at www. 
brookfieldzoo.org. 



Green Thumb launches search for 



Illinois' Outstanding Older Worker 




Green Thumb, Inc. is searching f< 
OutstandingOlderWorkerof2001. Forthe 
fourth year, outstanding older workers from 
every state, the District of Columbia, and Puer- 
to Rico will be honored in their homestates 

id in Washington D.C at the National Prime 
Time Awards Program held in mid-September. 
Green Thumb developed the National Prime 
Time Awards in 1998 to highlight the valuable • 
contributions older workers make in their 
communities and places for work. 

Nominees must be 65-years-of-age or 
older, a resident of Illinois, currently em- 
ployed, and working at least 20 hours each 
week. The winner must also be willing and 
able to travel to Washington, D.C forthe Na- 
tional Prime Time Awards Program events. 

All nominees will be eligible for awards at 
both state and national levels. In the sate se- 
lection process, an independent committee 
( will evaluate the nominations and select up to 
• four state winners. Winners will receive their 
awards in Springfield at the Illinois Older 
Worker Awards Luncheon, hosted by the Illi- 
nois Department on Aging, on Sept. 19. From 
those four, one winner will be selected to at- 
tend die N _____ 
gram and events held in Washington, D.C. 

The expense-paid trip includes a tour of the 



's landmarks, meetings with congression- 
al representatives, U.S. Senate and House 
events, a tour of the White House, arid the 
awards banquet and ceremony at historic 

Union Station..-' 

Nominations for Illinois' Outstanding 
Older Worker of 2001 must include a brief 
narrative that highlights die older worker's 
overall contribution to the business, includ- 
ing longevity, experience, skill level, work eth- 
ic, any disabilities die nominee has overcome 
to perform his/her job, and a description of 
his/her community involvement. 

A search for America's Oldest Worker is 
also underway. Last year's winner, Robbie 
Eisenberg, 102, manages a zipper manufac- 
turing operation for Zabin Industries in Los 
Angeles, CA. The 1999 winner, Dr. F. William 
Sunderman of Philadelphia, PA, now 101, 
continues to edit a national medical journal. 
Nominees must be employed at least 20- 
hours a week and have the earliest verifiable 
birth date to be declared the winner. 

To obtain nomination information, 
please call the Green Thumb state office at 
(800) 962-1855. Nominations may be e- 
mailed to Green Thumb, P.O. Box 769, Harris- 
burg, IL 62946 and must be - ' J - 

later than June 15. 




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8LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



April 13, 2001 



Nature habitat posters available 



Illinois nature lovers can now purchase a 
scries of Illinois Habitat Posters, which arc 
beautifully rich in dramatic photographs. The 
18-inch by 24-inch posters are reproduced in 
full color and illustrate the species and land- 
scapes of two unique Illinois 
habitats: Northern Bog and 
Cypress Swamp. 

Each poster depicts a 
specific habitat and each 
habitat is surrounded by 
photographs of plants or ani- 
mals associated with it. The 
plants or animals on the 
poster are identified and an 
accompanying one-page 
document provides short de- 
scriptions of all the pho- 
tographs in the poster as well 
as an educational activity for 
the poster. I' 




The photographs on each poster were tak- 
en by Michael Jeffords and Susan Post, both 
with the Illinois Natural History Survey and 
well known for their striking photography as 
well as their commitment to awareness, appre- 
ciation and conservation of the 
wild lands of Illinois. They con- 
ceived of the project unique 
Illinois habitats. 

Cypress Swamp and 
Northern Bog are currently 
available through the Illinois 
State Natural History Survey 
Distribution Center, 607 E. 
Pcabody Dr., Champaign, IL 
61820. Send a check for $4 for 
each poster and make it 
payable to the Illinois Natural 
History Survey. To place a 
credit card order, call (217) 

333-6880. 



D inner and auction 
to benefit Family Network 



Family Network announces their 2001 
Annual Gala Benefit, "ThcTime of 
Your Life," Friday evening April 20 at 
the Highland Park Country Club. The 
event will Include dinner and silent auction 
with the special presentation of the agency's 
2001 "Friend of the Family Award" to the 
Kaufman Family of Highland Park, and to the 
Chicago Tribune Holiday Fund. 

Music and dancing to the musical group 
"The Satin Touch H and Family Network alum 
Anita Silvcrt will appear as guest vocalist. 
Reservations are $100 per person with pro- 
ceeds benefiting Family Network of Highland 
Park, for information call 433-0377. 

Longtime Family Network supporters 



William and Rebckah Kaufman of Highland 
Park, Jonathan and Kulie Kaufman of Wood- 
stock, and Daniel and Amy Kaufman of 
Highland Park, are being recognized for 
their service to community and humanitari- 
an causes. 

The award will also be presented to the 
Chicago Tribune Holiday Fund, a fund of The 
McCormick Tribune Foundation, for their 
continued support of Family network's "Right 
From the Start " program. 

Family Network is a family resource 
agency aimed at strengthening families with 
children from birth to age four by providing 
parent support, social and educational pro- 
grams and development activities. 



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C afe ALDENTE prese nts: 

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years ago, owner Peter Tang has made 
sure only the best Chinese food in the 
area is served in its exotic Oriental atmos- 
phere, with quality, freshness^service and 
the best value for the money the main 

focus* v; ',' V;--'' 

Tang's is well-known for its menu that 
offers a wide variety of Chinese food thqt'^t, 
includes all the most popular Cantonese; £>%% 
Szechwan, Mandarin and Hunan dishes^/i 
at the most reasonable prices. 
. Fast and courteous service by a knowl- 
edgeable staff is a must in bringing you 
the finest Oriental food prepared iw chefs 
with over 45 years of experience^* ^ 

Make reservations early for that special 
event to be held in a private dinning room 
that seats 80. There, you and ydur^guests 
can experience the adventure of dinning 
on Tang's delicious Chinese cuisine tog© 'thti 
er. Dine-in or carry-out are both availa 






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Tang's Is open seven days a week, fjro 
11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday, from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. on 
Friday and Saturday, 
and from 2:30 to 9 p.m. bn£uftday 
: 'At Tang's "Our customers ar« bur crlt- 
Icsl Visit us once and we'll guarantee . ^ - :> 
you'll be back for more!" **" ^^S^'"' 

Call (847)548-8882 for reservations/to - 
order, or for more information. ^S^L %ys . 



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- 1 



April 13, 2001 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Pi— 



LAKELIFE 9- 







. 






! 



Everything for the home at the 
Zion Home and Trade Show 



The Zion Park District will hold its 24th 
Annual Home and Trade Show on April 20- 
22, at the Zion Leisure Center, located at 2400 

mortal Dr. in Zion. The show in- 
er 90 exhibitors of home improve- 







Peter 



9 




Celebrating 40 years together... 







merit related products anil services, the ma- 
jority of which are based in Lake County. Visit 
the show on Friday from 5-9 p.m., Saturday, 
1 1 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, noon-4 p.m. Ad- 
mission is free. 

Area businesses, retailers, contractors 
and service organizations use the Home and 
Trade Show to promote their services and to 
increase the public's awareness of the avail- 
ability of their products. Another important 
feature of the show is the opportunity to 
make direct contact with potential customers 
and clients. Banks, real estate agencies and 




home remodelers also are regular partici- 
pants at the trade show. 

This year's show will feature a variety of 
entertainment presentations, which include 
music, variety acts and demonstrations. 

Another feature is the awarding of door 
prizes valued at over $5000. Prizes, donated 
by the exhibitors participating in the show 
and the Zion Park District, are awarded 
throughout the three-day show. Home elec- 
tronics, gift certificates, small appliances and 
vacation trips will be awarded. The grand 
prize is a vacation trip for two. Vacation desti- 
nations previously won have included Orlan- 
do, Las Vegas, New Orleans and Nassau, Ba- 
hamas. 

To find out more about the home show, 
please call the Zion Park District at 746-5500. 



Illinois Arts Council seeks applicants 



The Illinois Arts Council (IAQ is now 
seeking applicants for its 2002-2004 Arts-in- 
Education (AIE) Residence Program Artists 
Roster. Performing arts companies and indi- 
vidual artists representing the disciplines of 
creative writing, dance, ethnic and folk arts, 
media arts, music, theater or visual arts, who 
are interested In participating in this IAC pro- 
gram, are encouraged to contact the Arts Ed- 
ucation Program staff. 

Applications are available in hard copy 
and on the IAC's web site. Visit the site at 
www.state.il.us/agency/iac The application 
deadline is June 1. 

Artists and performing arts companies in- 
cluded in the roster are eligible to participate 
in IAC funded Arts-in-Education residencies 
occurring throughout the state between Oct. 
15, 2002 and Aug. 31, 2004. 

Grant-writing workshops designed to aid 
artists in completing the AIE Artist Roster ap- 
plication begin in April. The workshop sched- 
ule is available and will accompany the appli- 
cation and be posted on the IAC web site. 

The IAC Arts-in-Education Residency 
Program provides support to primary and 
secondary educational institutions, commu- 



nity colleges and non-profit local arts and 
community organizations to work with an 
artist or performing arts company to meet the 
needs and interests of their targeted partici- 
pants. Residency artists work primarily with 
students up to 15 hours a week in residencies 
lasting from one to six months. During the 
course of the residency, the artist will also 
create programs for teachers and present 
community events. 

For more information about the AIE Resi- 
dency Program, visit the IAC web site to view 
the program guidelines. Individuals who 
have questions should contact the AIE Pro- C 1 
gram Representative at (312)814-6780 direct, 
via email at george@arts.state.il.us, or call 
(800)237-6994 toll-free. Individuals who are 
deaf or who have hearing or voice-impair- 
ments should call (312)814-4831 for theTTY 

telephone. 

The mission of the Illinois Arts Council is 
to serve the diverse people and communities 
of Illinois with quality, accessible arts pro- 
gramming, through' engaging In active sup- 
port and development of Illinois artists, arts 
organizations, educational institutions and 
communities. 



The internationally acclaimed folk 
trio, Peter, Paul and Mary, return to The 
Hemmens Cultural Center in Elgin on 
Friday, April 20 at 8 p.m. They will, 

again, entertain the audience with their M 

warm charm and magical musical legai 
lowin' In The Wind," "If I Had AHam 
mer," and "Puff the Magic Dragon" as they 
celebrate their 40th Anniversary as a trio. 

The Grammy Award - winning folk 
singers inspire people of different cul- 
tures, generations, and beliefs with their 
harmonious blend of voices, joy, and com- 
mitment to "making a difference." 

Since its inception forty years ago at Green 
wich Village's Bitter End coffee house, the trio has 
been a union of distinctly different artists committed to 

common goals. As Mary Travers notes, "We've always been involved with issues that deal with 
fundamental human rights of people, whether that means the right to political freedom or the 
right to breathe air that's clean." 

Although Peter Yarrow, Paul Stookey and Mary Travers each have separate interests and im- 
pressive solo projects which they've pursued, they are united in their respect and shared affec- 
tion for the tradition of folk music which they view as being a music of activism and hope. 

On Friday, April 20 at 8 p.m. The Hemmens Cultural Center will again be fortunate to have 
Peter, Paul and Mary bring their special warmth and music to its stage and honored to host their 
40th anniversary. 

A few single tickets are still available on the Main Floor ($54) and some seats remain in the bal- 
cony ($52); Golden Circle seats are sold out Call the Hemmens* 24-Hour Charge-It Line 931-5900. 





Lambs Farm, Sassafras team up 



A hew venture with Sassafras Enterprises, 
Inc., a company specializing in housewares, 
gourmet foods and children's products, has 
created additional meaningful jobs for the 
people served at Lambs Farm — adults with 
developmental disabilities. The successful 
new focus on wholesale production and co- 
packaging in Aunt Mary's C 

Lambs Farm is not only bringing in a steady 
stream of income but is also helping program 
participants expand their transferable skills. 
■•Workers at one of the businesses of Lambs 

Farm, Aunt Mary's Country Store, have kept 



Mow 



busy bottling a variety of dipping oils and as- 
sembling pizza kits for Sassafras. One worker, 
Dole Polconer, sold of the Sassafras venture, "If* 
is a good job. I like doing it I've learned new 
things (including) teamwork." 

Sassafras Supply Chain Manager Madra 
Goldyn said, "Though our partnership has 
been short, it rios been a learning, growing, 
nding and rewarding relationship." 

Those interested in utilizing Lambs Farm 
for wholesale production or co-packaging 
projects can call Sales manager Judy 
Pietrowski at 362-4634, ext 797. 



VMIK 



year 



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ignites 
stage at Chicago Shakespeare 

t 

Popular 'Short Shakespeare' program returns 
to Navy Pier in Saturday abridgment 





"Romeo and Juliet" tells the explosive sto- 
ry of star-crossed lovers, dueling families and 
tumultuous first love, concentrating the tale 
into 75 high-energy minutes. Presented every 
Saturday at 1 1 a.m. Now through April 21, in 
Chicago.Shakespeare's beautiful courtyard- 
style theater on Navy Pier, a 15-minute post- 
show discussion with the actors follows each 
performance. 

Chicago Shakespeare Theater's popular 
program, Short Shakespeare, selects the best- 
known Shakespearean plays and crafts them 
into shorter-length versions. With its timeless 
story and swift-moving action, this "Romeo 
and Juliet" offers high-quality entertainment 
that fits into busy schedules-and is a perfect 
complement to family- friendly activities on 
Navy Pier. 

Directed by Kim Rubinstein, the produc- 
tion sheds light on the play's relevance to 



contemporary issues. Rubinstein points out, 
"I want our production to invoke in the audi- 
ence a breathlessness as they watch. As an 
abridgment, it has its own passion and its 
own drive." 

The parallels drawn between Renais- - 
sance Italy, where the play takes place, and 
today's world are reflected in all aspects of . 
the production, including its costume design 
and musical score. Costumes are fabricated 
in leathers and rich fabrics, and characters 
sport bold colors and medallions-all as popu- 
lar today as in Renaissance Italy. The score 
combines contemporary sound design and 
more traditional period music. 

Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for children 
and $8 for student groups of 20 or more. For 
more information and to purchase tickets, 
contact the Chicago Shakespeare Theater box 

office at (312) 595-5600. 




Wedding/Engagement/ 




Anniversary announcements 

To announce a wedding, engagement or anniversary, 

call (847) 223-8161 

There is a short form to fill but and re 




* ■ 



i 



Forms can be mailed or faxed to you 



liste 



Photos are welcome and feesare 
Mailing address: Lakeland Media 

Gray slake, 3 i 60030. Attn: Bridal Sec. 



SOS. 



the forms 
~ tneySL, 




Call Nancy Tliielsen (847)223-8161, ext. 143, with questions 




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10LAKELIFE 



Lakeland Newspapers 



April 13, 2001 



Local bands rock Round Lake Social Club 



By LI8A ROWE 
Staff Reporter 



Pour hmulii plnnnod to play a heavy- 
niotnl concert for n flrowlnu crowd April 7 nt 
(ho Hound Lnko Social Club. PrnceouH from 
the concert woro to bo donated to "A Safe 
Plnco," a shelter for vlctlmn of domestic vio- 
lence In the Lake County area, 

UndorMltch was thu first hand to play 
and not thu crowd moving an they plnyou 
their hardcore hoavy metal tunes, This hand 
has n lot Kolnu far them, using their own 
unique sound nnd Htylo to warm up thu 
crowd for the hands (hat woro to follow their 
* performance, 

Understltch made good use of their 
songs, having a calm and slow sound one 
minute and a fast-paced, hoavy sound the 
next, all in one song, Their next perfor- 
mance will ho at Harlhquako's In Frankfort, 
7000 W. lit. 30, at 0:30 p.m. on April 20, The 
cover charge for this concert Is $(), For more 
Information visit Wndorstltch's web site at 
209,12,21fl,100/stltch/shows.htm ( 

The second hand to play was VMM0. 
who kept the energy flowing through the 
crowd with tholr mix of aggressive and 
heavy-moial tunes, Those men made good 
use of the stage and encouraged thu crowd 
to participate by singing along, The mem- 
bers of VIsflMO poured their own personal 
experiences and attitudes Into their perfor- 
mance to create an experience that was un- 
forgettable to those who saw thorn play, 
Tholr next concert will bo April 14 nt The 
Shack In Mundeleln, 20006 Park Ave,, 500- 
7000, at 9 p.m. This show Is 21 and ovor, For 
*.more. information visit VIsflMO's web site nt 
www.vl840.com, 

By the time Cry For Dawn was sot up for 
their sot, the crowd was high on adrenaline, 
Unfortunntoiy, (his led to a minor fight with- 
in the small mosh pit that had formed, Po- 
lice and ambulancos arrived In the mlddlo of 
Cry For Dawn's set, Ikcauso a few people 
sustained Injuries from tho fight, the concert 
was shut down and tho final hand Lung- 
brush did not got to play, 




Leader singer Ash from the band Cry For Dawn finishes up a song at the Round 
Lake Soclol Club, —Photo by Lisa ffowe . 



Up until this point, Cry For Dawn 
walked onto tho stage with n dominating 
presence, commanding tho full attention of 
all tholr fans, From tho beginning, tholr mu- 
sic movod overy person In the room, leaving 
not a body unstirred by tho fast-paced and 
emotional songs, Cry For Dawn's singer, 
Ash, had quite n few fans who grabbed the 
front row In front of tho stage, singing along 
to every song thut ho sang. 

These young mon showed n lot of talont, 
which might also explain why Conspiracy 
Records has picked them up on tholr label. 
Cry For Dawn's porformnnce Is truly an 
amazing one, not to mention emotionally 



and physically energetic to hoar and watch, 
try For Dawn has n few more concerts 
coming up, so If you missed this one, then 
bo sure to chock out the noxt show, April 14 
thoy will bo playing at Earthquake's In 
Frankfurt, 7000 W, Rt, 30, at p.m. 

Cry For Dawn will alio be playing April 
20 nt Klub Phenomenon In Frooport, 209 S, 
Galena Ave. There will bo a bus leaving for 
tho show for any fans Intorestod In attend- 
ing the concort, Tlckoti will bo $15 which 
will bo available on tho bus. For more Infor- 
mation, contact Tonya at 546-6013, or visit 
the Cry For Dawn web slto at www, 
cryfordnwn.net. 



Opportunities for 
teachers this 
summer at Trees 



5 



Troos For Tomorrow's summer llno-up of 
continuing education courses for teachers 
has boon sot with tho first offering, Wetlands 
Ecology, slated for June 10-22, 

'This year wo'ro also plnnnlng a second 
course with a wotlands emphasis called 
Flants of Northern Wetlands and that one Is 
scheduled for July 30 - Aug, 3," said toachor 
class coordinator loo Panel, 

In between, Panel said, are three courses 
with a forestry emphasis, one focusing on 
early childhood curriculum with an outdoor 
emphasis, and ono featuring a backpack ad- 
venture to Uppor Michigan's Pictured Rocks 
National Lakeshoro, 

"Hnch course Is offered for one or two 
University of Wisconsin credits and scholar* 
ships are generally available to reduce tho 
cost of the classes," Panel explained, Ho 
urged teachers who might he Intorestod In at- 
tending ono of this summer's offerings to coll 
early for registration and scholarship Infor- 
mation, 'Hie number Is (000) THT-WBG 

"The ono thing our natural science cours- 
es offer that not many others do Is the oppor- 
tunity for teachers to got out Into the forosts, 
wotlands and water systems of tho north* 
woods," Panel continued, "Teachers loam by 
first hand involvement and that oxporlonce Is 
Invaluablo In reaching studonti back In tho 
classroom, Many of our coursoi also Include 
curriculum and activity ldoai for toachors to 
toko homo and uso In tholr classrooms, 

Other summer courses for toachors this 
yoar nt Troos For Tomorrow Includo Promot- 
ing Wonder and Curiosity In Carly Childhood 
Curriculum, Juno 20-22; Forest Flora, July 9- 
13; Developing and Using Your School For- 
est, July 16-20; and Backpack Pictured Rocks, 
July20-Aug.5, 

Toachors can call for a detailed catalog of 
courso offorlngs at (600) 636-0472 or uso a* 
mall at treos®nnox.net, Tho wobslto Is 
www.treosfortomorrow.com, 



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Lamb cakes 

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¥ Buttercream . 
¥ Coconut 
¥ Chocolate 

Bunny Treats 

¥ Miniature Bunny & Egg Cakes 
¥ Miniature Pastry 
¥ Easter Basket Cupcakes 
¥ Large Easter Cookies 



Old Family Pound Coke Recipe BUHny CakeS 



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Egg CakeS *Old Family Pound Cake Recipe 

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Specialties 

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BASKET 
STUFFERS 

Assorted Easter Candles 

Stuffed Lambs 

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April 13, 2001 



Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE11 



ROSSWORD 



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Join Us For Our 

Easter Buffet 

Sunday, April *5^ 

» 

FULL BUFFET I0:00am-2:30pm 

Adults $14.95 • Children 3-10 $6.95 

Children Under 3 FREE 





EARLY BIRD SPECIAL 

Breakfast Buffet 7am- 10am 

Adults $10.95 • Children 3-10 $6.95 

Undcr3FREE 



Easter Bunny 

Visits Us 

.Oam- lpm 






On Easter 



K» 



Located on 60/83 (1/4 Mile N. of Midlothian Rd. in 



566-4520 












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ACROSS 

1. Uncovered 
5. Secret 

10. Radio telegraphic sigr 

14. Phil ; former CIA 

15. Ancient Greek 

16. Stock purchase plan 

17. See 59 across 

20. Backwardnesses 

21. Debilitated 

22. Not just "play" 

23. Description 
25. Ropes 
29. As the crow flies 

33. Purgatives 

34. Be in pain 

35. Type of copier 

36. Most unusual 
38. American state 
41.Shoshonean 

42. Cicatrix 

44. Weather and wind 

45. Bourgeois 

48. Bryophytes 

49. Paddles 

50. Mythological bird 

51. Alter 
1. Continually complaining 

or faultfinding 

59. Commemorative 

with 17 across 

62. Buffalo 

63.*Grape 

64. Hebrew calendar month 

65. Program 

66. Cubes 

67. Rail 



don champion 

12. Worked the soil 

13. Nimble 

18. Other side 

19. Selfish person 

23. More timid 

24. Inquiry 
25.Alarm . 

26. Winged 

27. More sensitive 

28. Center 

29. Anwar _, 

statesman 

30. Linda 





Egyptian 











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31. Geology 

32. Hairstyle 
37. Despot 

39. Shorebird 

40. No longer is 

43. Central nervous system, 
abbr. 

46. Ballroom dances 

47. Pilgrim's journey 

48. Robert _, American rev- 
olutionary 

50. European river 
51.Kwa 

52. Belonging to me ' 

53. Enough (archaic) 

54. Invests in little enterprises 

55. Expression of relief 

56. Unemployed 

57. Algonquian tribe 

58. Type genus of the Hylidae 
60. Radioactivity unit 
61. fi (slang) 

ANSWERS 



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April 14th 



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2. Developed 

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5. Playoff 

6. Not technical 

7. Ancient Olympic Site 

8. Own (Scottish) 

9. Kilocalorie, abbr. 

10. Determine 

11. Arthur . Wimble 





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Caring families are 
sought to host high school 
exchange students from over 
23 countries by the American 
Intercultural Student Ex- 
change, Inc. (AISE).jP^^ 

This year will be the 20th 
Anniversary of AISE's ex- 
change program and as 
more and more overseas 
students hear of the AISE 
program, AISE is committed 
to finding more and more 
caring families. Students ar- 
rive In August to live with 
their American host families 
and attend the local high 
school for the 2001-2002 
school year. These eager 
young students, between 15 
and 18 years of age, are 
coming to the United States 
to learn about America and 
the American way of life 
while sharing their culture 
with their host families, 
friends and schools. "Global 



Global Unity helped by caring families 

unity begins at home," com- 
mented Anne Ring, Presi- 
dent of AISE, "The friend- 



ships that develop during 
the year between students 
and host families are usually 
life-long. They do not lose 
touch with each other. 

Students speak English, 
have their own spending 
money, medical insurance 
and are excited about be- 
coming a part of an American 
family. Prospective host fam- 
ilies are interviewed by an 
AISE Program Representative 
and assisted with the selec- 
tion of their student 

Host families provide 
housing, food and a family 
atmosphere for the student 

Call AISE's tell free num- 
ber at (800) SIBLING or visit 
the AISE web site at 

www.aise.com to learn more 
about the benefits of hosting 
an exchange student 






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Awesome Anaj Including. 

• Fresh Carved Sirloin of Beef 

• Fresh Carted Roast Tiirkf Breast 
•Fresh Carted Claud Ham 

• Oddten Stir Frj 

• Spinach and Rkotta Stuffed Shells 

• Codfish de Jotfine 
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• Scrambled Eggs 

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• Our Famous Salad Bar 
•Assorted Fresh Pastries 

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Lakeland Newspapers 



2001 



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They delivered and installed my 
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will recommend Signature's 
service to everyone I know." 

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NEWSPAPERS 



April 13-19, 2001 



CLASSIFIED 






Mermaid Magic 

Gurnee Holiday Inn Chef and international ice carver Mark Johnson carves a mer- 
maid out of a 300-pound ice block during the first annual Chef's Cuisine, hosted 
by HealthReach Clinic in Waukegan. The event, held at Midlane Resort in 
Wadsworth, featured cooking demonstrations by Chef Jay Lowell of Lowell's Restau- 
rant in Lake Forest and Chef Carlos Garcia of Madison Ave. Restaurant in 



Waukegan. 



Krueger 



CLC okays certificate 
in medical imaging 



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• • The College of Lake County board of 

trustees has approved the addition of two 

j short-term certificate options, one in Medical 

* v Resonance Imaging (MRI) and another in 

V. Computed Tomography CT scan). Certificates 

■' ^mmmmmmmrm approval to the Illinois 

Community College Board. 

The 15-credit hour MRI certificate and the 

12-credit-hour CT certificate will enhance the 

; 4 , competency skills required by registered or reg- 

istry-eligible radiologic technologists to obtain 



t ■*■ 



advanced certification. Both certificates will be 
offered to address the shortage of MRI and CT 
scan technologists in Lake County. 

In other action, the board approved a 

Memorandum of Agreement with the Great* 1 
Lakes Naval Training Center 'through April 2006 '" 
to continue the colleges educational and train- 
ing services for Navy personnel, including 
courses leading to associate degrees, and reg- 

Please see CLC/B25 



D eadline near for plant sale 



The pre-sale deadline is approaching for 
this years Native Plant Sale. Order your native 
. wildflowers and prairie grasses from the Lake 
County Forest Preserves through April 25. ■ 

Pick up a Native Plant Sale catalog and or- 
der form at the Forest Preserve General offices, 
located on Milwaukee Ave. north of Buckley Rd. 
near Libertyville, or call the Native Plant Sale 
hotline at 960-3333 to receive one by mail. Look 
at plant pictures and download the Native 
Plant Sale order form from die Forest Preserves' 
website at www.co.lake.il.us/forest/nps.htm 

Advance orders will be available for pick- 
up on Saturday, May 12 from 11:30 a;m.-4:30 
p.m., at Old School Forest Preserve, located on 



St. Mary's Rd„ south of Rte. 176 near Liber- 
tyville. Additional individual plants will be 
available for purchase at Old School on May 12. 
All proceeds from the Native Plant Sale benefit 
the Preservation Partners and Mighty Acorns 
youth stewardship programs of the Lake Coun- 
ty Forest Preserves. 

While at Old School to pick up your plants, 
browse the native pi ant- related items for sale 
or chat with native plant experts. 

Native plants naturally thrive in Lake 
County soil and weather, requiring less time, ef- 
fort and expense to maintain. They provide 
valuable food and shelter to native birds, but- 
terflies and other wildlife. 



Lakes study provides 

blueprint for future 



A study of smaller lakes in Lake County re- 
vealed that most provide habitat for State 
threatened and endangered bird species. It also 
indicated that these lakes have moderate to se- 
vere shoreline erosion, are moderately to se- 
verely nutrient enriched, and are plagued by 
the exotic aquatic plant species known as 
Eurasian water mllfoil.The study was conduct- 
ed by the Lake County Health 
Department/Community Health Center's 
Lakes Management Unit, and focused on 32 
small, local lakes that are experiencing In- 
creased usage. 

"This study is an important piece of a larg- 
er picture," said LCHD/CHC Executive Direc- 
tor Dale W. Galassie. "Our Lakes Management 
team first analyzes the conditions of the lakes 
to develop recommendations on how each 
lake's quality can be improved and protected. 
The team then works with the stewards of each 



lake, such as the Forest Preserve District, park 
districts, municipalities and lake associations, 
to implement the recommendations. Overall, 
better lakes protection helps enhance the qual- 
ity of life in our county." 

In 2000, the County Board provided a spe- 
cial appropriation of $95,000 and the Lake 
County Forest Preserve District provided 
$30,000 to the Health Department to expand its 
Lakes Management Unit. The Unit used the 
funds to add two full-time water quality spe- 
cialists and one part-time lab technician, as 
well as to purchase new lab equipment. With 
additional resources, the Unit targeted lakes 
that are experiencing increased usage/ While 
the fundirig was for one year, it is part of a five- 
year initiative. 

The lakes protection status report submit- 

* 

Please seeSTi)DY/B25 



Construction season 
begins on county roads 



With some projects already underway, the 
Lake County Division onransportation kicked- 
off construction season when It presented Its 
2001 construction program to the county 
board's Public Works andTransportadon com- 
mittee./ J ' 

-Theprograrft consists of oyer 29 projects 
involving 17 miles of county high way* with an 
expected cost of approximately $39 million. Al- 
though work on several of these projects has al- 



ready begun, it is expected that construction 
will continue on most projects through the fall, 
with several of the larger projects carrying over 
into next year. 

The 2001 construction program Is die re- 
sult of significant planning and engineering ef- 
forts. A highway project typically takes several 
years of study and engineering to properly ad- 

Please see ROADS/B25 



C alabr ese gains honor 

as distinguished alum 



Pat J. Calabrese, president of the Grieve 
Corporation in Round Lake, has received the 
Distinguished Alumnus Award from the De- 
partment of Mechanical and Industrial Engi- 
neering (M&IE) at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign. The award was an- 
nounced during the M&IE Alumni Board 

spring meeting. 

Calabrese graduated from the U of I in 1949 
with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engi- 
neering. He worked for Link-Belt Corporation, 



Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Corpora- 
tion, and die Cramer Controls Company before 
joining die Grieve Corporation as a sales engi- 
neer in 1958. At mat time, the company had a 
dozen employees, by the mid 1990s, it had 
grown to more than 150 employees, and Cal- 
abrese had risen from sales engineer to vice 
president and finally to president of the firm. 
He's been instrumental in the company's sue- 

Please seeCAlABRESE/B25 




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B2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



April 13, 2001 



Free 




admission 



» V 

The Board of Directors of the Lake County 
Fair Association would like to welcome groups 
of children or disabled persons to participate 
in the 2001 Fair. 

Free admission to these groups and 
their escorts or chaperones is available dur- 
ing the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Tues- 
day, Wednesday and Thursday, July 24, 25 
and 26. Chaperones for facilities who do not 
have handicapped persons or children are 
limited to one chaperone for every Vvjq per- 
sons or children who attend the Fair on 
group days. 

To take advantage of this offer, groups 
must request this free admission in advance, in 
writing on their official letterhead and include 
their Illinois State license number. Indicate the 
day you wish to attend, along with the number 
of children or disabled persons and their chap- 
erones. This policy was established on Sept. 9, 



1996 by the Lake County Fair Association: A 
private non-profit association. Direct your re- 
quest to Jan Raftis, Lake County Fair Associa- 
tion, P.O. Box 216, Grayslake, IL 60030-0216. 

You may purchase ride tickets for your 
group at a reduced rate on Tuesday, Wednes- 
day and Thursday at a designated ticket booth 
near your entry gate before the midway opens 
at noon. On Tuesday, rides will be $1 per tick- 
et from noon-5 p.m. with kiddie rides requir- 
ing one ticket. All other rides, two tickets. On 
Wednesday and Thursday, rides will be $75 per 
tiqket of $15 for 20 tickets from noon-5 p.m. 
with kiddie rides requiring two tickets. All oth- 
ers, three and four tickets or $15 for a wrist- 
band with unlimited rides. 

The general admission to the Fair is $7, se- 
nior citizens $3, and children under 12 years 
are admitted free. There is no other charge for 
parking, special events or grandstand. 



NEW BUSINESSES 






The following are new businesses located 
in Lake County. 

Artistic Touch Taxidermy, 26183 
Rollins Rd., Inglesidc, III. 60041. Richard Pawei- 
czyk, owner. Phone (847) 587-0275. 






C&LSIgn Co., 37562 N. Hwy. 12, Spring 
Grove, IL 60081. Cynthia Hernandez, owner. 
Phone (847) 973-1420. 

lean Design, 25626 Somerset Ct., 
Hawthorn Woods, III. 60047. Jean K. Schmitz, 
owner. Phone (847) 540-0102. 



' Architectural Wood Interiors, 33 S. 

Lake Ave., Lake Villa, 111. 60046. Leonard Beck- 
man, Laura Beckman, owners. Phone (847) 
223-6745. 

Leader Creations, 20805 N. Elizabeth 
St., Prairie View, III. 60069. Anouch Laeder, 
Thomas Laeder, owners. Phone (847) 215- 
9315. 

L. Fabian Chimney Services; 34820 

N. Lakevicw Ct., McHenry, III. 60050. 
Lawrence P. Fabian, owner. Phone (847) 
587-3253. 



• - 



Wedding/Engagement/Anniversary announcements 

To announce a wedding, engagement or anniversary, call (847) 223-0161; 

There is a short form to fill out and return. Forms can be mailed or faxed to you. Photos arc welcome. 

Fees arc listed on the forms. Mailing address: Lakeland Media, 30 S. Whitney St, 

Grayslake, IL 60030. Attn: Bridal Sec 
Call Nancy Thielscn (847) 223-8161, cxt. 143, with questions. 





















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/Ipr// 13, 2001 



COUNTY 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



Youth Conservation Corps offers jobs, scholars 




Do you know a Lake County teenager 
who is looking for rewarding summertime 
employment? Young adults between the ages 
of 16 and 18, who are available between June 
18 and Aug. 10, can apply now for summer 
jobs with the Lake County Forest Preserves' 
Youth Conservation Corps (YCC). 

Applications are available now and can 
be picked up at the Forest Preserve General 
offices at 2000 N. Milwaukee Ave. in Liber- 
tyville. Call 367-6640 for a copy, or download 
one from the Forest Preserves web site at 
www.co.Iake.il.us/forest. Applications will be 
accepted at the General Offices through Fri- 
day, May 25. 

On Saturday, May 26, at 10 a.m., the 
YCC job lottery will be held at Half Day For- 
est Preserve near Vernon Hills to draw 
names of the applicants who will receive the 
summer positions. Applications will be ac- 
cepted up until the time of the lottery draw- 
ing. The drawing will take place at Half 




Day's Shelter C. 

Applicants need not be present to be 
awarded a position. However, alternates will 
be selected only from those present at the 
drawing. Winning applicants will be notified 
by June 8. 

Youth Conservation Corps Inc., a 501 (c) 
three not-for-profit that supports the YCC 
program will be providing three college 
scholarships for YCC Corps members. Partic- 
ipants may also be eligible for AmeriCorps 
College Scholarships. 

YCC positions offer rewarding summer 
employment. Outdoor work experiences 
are combined with 40 hours of environ- 
mental education and outdoor recreation 
to develop an understanding of and an ap- 
preciation for the environment and a 
healthy lifestyle. Students receive training 
In basic first aid, conservation practices, 
construction techniques and the proper 
use of hand tools. 






For the past 27 years, the Youth Conser- 
vation Corps has helped hundreds of young 
men and women gain work skills while learn- 
ing about the environment and enhancing 
Forest Preserves throughout Lake County. 
Donations are the sole source of the youths' 
salaries for the summer conservation job pro- 
gram. Major corporate supporters include 
Abbott Laboratories, Allegiance Healthcare 
Corporation and Motorola. Contributions of 
all levels from businesses, foundations and 
individuals are needed and appreciated. A 
goal of $150,000 to fund 55 positions has been 
set for 2001. A donation of $2,500 supports 
each position. 

Half Day Forest Preserve is located on 
Milwaukee Ave. (Rte. 21) south of Rte. 60 
near Vernon Hills. For more information on 
the drawing, job applications, or donating 
to the YCC program, call Noah Arvidson, 
YCC assistant program manager, at 968- 
3046. " 



Bank offers 
scholarships 

■ 

Lakeland Community Bank is sponsoring 
a $ 1 ,000 college scholarship to one senior from 
a high school in the area. There is also a $500 
high school scholarship available to one eighth 
grade student from a grade school in the area 
toward enrollment to Carmel High School or 
Marian Central Catholic High School. 

Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA, 
be involved in community service, and write an 
essay on "What is a community bank, and what 
importance does it have in my community?" or 
"How can school, business and community 
work together to make a difference?" 

Applications may be picked up at the bank 
at 935 W. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Heights or 
1310 S. Rte. 12, Fox Lake. Entries must be re- 
ceived by 4 p.m. on April 20. 



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•- 



OPINIONS 



April 13, 2001 




NEWSPAPERS 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 

John A. Koski 

Managing Editor 



30 South Whitney St, Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-81 6 1 . e-mail: edit@Iakclandmedla.com 



EDITORIALS 



Education keys 
quality of life 

In a letter of appreciation to voters for their support, newly elected 
Gurnec Mayor Don Rudny set down an agenda for the four years 
of service that he is facing that could well be a call to action for 
just about all of Lake County's 52 municipalities. 
Listed as major challenges are reducing traffic congestion, improv- 
ing transportation, maintaining the tax base, and staying financially 
viable without raising taxes. That covers just about everything except 
education and that is the purview of others. Or is it? 

Rudny spoke of maintaining a quality of life that suburban resi- 
dents have come to expect. An admirable goal, to be sure. Educa- 
tion unquestionably is high on any list of quality of life attributes. Vil- 
lage officials cannot ignore public school needs, particularly financial, 
because they are tied so closely to decisions made by village councils. 
Requests for more money made by Lakeland schools went down in 
flames in the spring election. Yes, the current uncertain economy was 
at fault, but there are other reasons as well. 

One of the reasons Rudny and fellow new mayors are in office to- 
day is that voters are beginning to make the connecUon between 
more rooftops and their tax bills. The executive casualties in April 3 
balloting largely were the result of aggressive growth policies orches- 
trated by municipal leaders in the '80s and '90s. Electors among other 
things are saying, "Turn off the spigot." 

They have made the connection mat the way unbridled growth 
impacts schools has a direct relationship to their quality of life, not to 
mention their pocketbooks. 

We'd like to suggest one other agenda item for newly elected lead- 
ers. That is interacting with neighboring communities and the coun- 
ty to address growth and development policies that have direct bear- 
ing on quality of life issues. Hopefully, the new breed of village lead- 
ers will see the wisdom of working together to solve the problems of 
their shared agendas. 



COMMENTARY 



Development fiasco 
cripples all sides 



By NORMAN C. GEARY 




The Round Lake of 60 days from now; Schools close, Village of Round 
Lake approves another development of several hundred town- 
homes on Fairfield Rd. 
In two months: 5,000 students go elsewhere for school while 
Round Lake village officials object to parking arrangements of development 
with several hundred townhomes. 

This week: With a bankrupt school system in their community, village 
staff urges elected officials to proceed with the development anyway, even 
though elected officials have the power but not the courage to say "enough." 

Absolutely one of the worst school situations in Illinois: Officials conUn- 
ue to do what got them where they are. Approving more residential develop- 
ment with more students for the school district that is virtually gone. Out of 
business. And, it's only the first of many. 

Insanity, it is said, is doing more of what you have always done, while 
thinking the results will be different. Round Lake citizens, your officials are 
immune from their surroundings. They stand in full admiration and awe of 
their new village hall built with the spoils of increased tax money collected 
from THEIR share of the tax levy. (Within sight of a school building that will 
be shuttered.) 

And, they're doing the same mindless hatchet job on Big Hollow and 
Grant High with their Valley Lakes 1,800-home development. And, they're 
doing it to Grayslake High and Grayslake Grade with their Madronna devel- 
opment on the south side of 120 west of Hainesville. 

. Who is advising them? 

Paid shiUs of the developer? Staff, whose main job is to build a resume? 
Experts taking advantage of the innocent village zoning and planning 
boards? Paid consultants for the land owner? 

Or, is it growth for the sake of growth. 

People everywhere better pay attention and vote. Yes, the problems of 
the Round Lake Schools are beyond description. But, even the best school 
system can't stand the onslaught ofwell-meaning-but-ili-informed-grow-at 
all-costs villages. And Round Lake schools have had their abundant share. 

It's coming soon to your school district. Round Lake schools are but the 
first (imagine what would happen if THIS was Highland Park?) 

So, it's time for 'the people everywhere to shout, "STOP!" Not to the 
schools/but to'the village hall.- ••■*'' : * ■ " 

Editor's note: Norman C Geary formerly served the Round Lake area 
as Avon Township supervisor. He is a past Lake County Board chairman. 
Geary now is a resident of Antiocli. 






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VIEWPOINT 



Habitat homes always affordable 



While Lake County 
polidcians continue 
their explo radon for 
affordable housing, 
Habitat for Humanity is getting 
ready for an aggressive home build- 
ing program for 2001 - 15 homes. 

Made famous by President Jim- 
my Carter, Habitat for Humanity is a 
non-profit, ecumenical, Christian 
housing ministry with the aim of 
helping eliminate poverty housing 
and homelessness worldwide. 

By any standard, Habitat homes 
built by volunteers are affordable. 
They're also sturdy, liveable and at- 
tractive. With construction focused 
on the south side ofWaukegan 
where land prices are lower, Habitat 
for Humanity Lake County has built 
homes with appraised value of 
$110,000 to $138,500. 

The local Habitat affiliate hopes 
to double production in several 
years. Executive Director Julie 
Donovan said research is underway 
to find building sites elsewhere in 
the county. 

Biggest pusher for affordable 
housing is Rep. Larry Lealblad (R- 
Highland Lake), chairman of the 
County Board's committee on build- 
ing, planning and zoning. Leafblad 
knows construction, growing up as 
the son of a master builder who op- 
erated his own construction compa- 
ny. The chairman also knows well 
the formidable obstacles con- 
fronting affordable housing pro- 
grams ranging from political to 
practical. 

Habitat is not a give-away. 
Homes are sold to partner families 
at no profit with interest-free morta- 
gages. Each family is required to 
contribute 500 hours in construc- 
tion needs. House payments are re- 
cycled to build more homes for 
struggling families. 

Donovan answered a question 
frequently asked about Habitat 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



homes. What's stopping new own- 
ers from selling at a nice profit? 
Technically, nothing," Donovan 
replied quickly. Complicated multi- 
tiered mortgages provide a safe- 
guard against resale. As a practical 
matter, Habitat homeowners fall in 
love with their homes and they 
wouldn't mink of relocating. 

ConstrucUon manager Ted Ra- 
mai says a basic plan has been per- 
fected that meets building standards 
and codes anywhere in Lake County. 
Habitat always has an urgent need 
for skilled construction workers, but 
novices can help, too. 

The county affiliate will hold a 
volunteer orientation meeting at 
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 17, at its of- 
fice, 315 N. Utica St., Waukegan. 
Monthly sessions are held the third 
Tuesday of every month except De- 
cember. 

Lealblad and other political lead- 
ers get tangled up over a definition 
of affordable housing. Maybe 
Donovan has the answer when she 
says simply, * We want to make sure 
everybody has a decent place to 
live." 

Calling musicians 

Vernon Hills Symphony has 
openings in all secUons - strings, 
woodwind, brass and percussion. 



Director Frank Lestina, starting his 
third year, invites interested musi->» 
cians to contact him at 932-2282. 
Rehearsals have started for two ■% . 
summer concerts and a winter per- 
formance. Maestro Lestina has 
players as young as age 12, ever ex- 
panding die roster so he has at least 
75 musicians available for a concert 

Valet parking 

One of me reasons why Lake For- 
est Hospital Is popular with Lake- 
land residents Is free valet parking at 
the 900 and 800 Medical 
Buildings. Begun last summer on a 
"check-it-out" basis, the service 
now is firmly implanted. 



Flood memories 

Friends of outgoing An doch 
Mayor Marilyn Shineflug trace her 
defeat to a flood in 1986 that caused 
extensive damage to homes In Oak- 
wood Knolls long before she came 
to office. An eight- Inch rainfall last 
June 12-13 rekindled memories of 
flood victims, providing fodder for 
the April 3 election. Shades of. 
Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne. History 
records that she was defeated for re- 
election because of a record snow- 
fall that buried the city for several 
days. 



Fighting taxes 

U.S. Senate candidate John Cox 
will be handing out anti-tax flyers to 
last minute tax filers at the Chicago 
Post office, 433 W. Harrison St. Cox, 
first announced challenger to U.S. 
Sen. Dick D.urbin (D-Ill.), says when 
he gets to Washington, he wants to 
"empower taxpayers, not the IRS." 
Cox is building on support he 
gained last year when he ran third in 
a field of 1 1 seeking die Republican 
nomination from the 10th Congres- 
sional District along the North 
Shore. 



Where to call or write 



United States Senators 
Peter Fitzgerald 

SD555 Dfrksen Senate Office Bldg., 
Washington, DC, 20510; (202) 224-2654; 
fax, (202) 228-1372 or 
230 S. Dearborn St., Rm., 3900, 
Chicago, IL, 60604; (312) 886-3506 

e-mail: 

senator JitzgeraldG > fitzgeraid.senate.gov 

Richard Durbin 

332 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg. 
Washington: D.C.; 2051 0;' (202) 224-2152; or 230 S, 
-Dearborn St.,Rm.; 3892, ' 

iChtcdgo, IL, 60604; (312) 353-4952; 
e-mail: dick © durbin.sena te. gov: 
Web site: www.senate.gov/-durbin 



Representatives In Congress 

8th District - Philip M. Crane, 

233 Cannon Office Bldg., 

Washington, D.C., 20515; 

(202) 225-371 1; or 300 N. Milwaukee Ave., 

Ste., C, Lake Villa.IL 60046; 265-9000; or 1 100 W 

Northwest Hwy., Palatine, I L60067; 358-9160; Web 

site: www.house.gov/crane ■> ' ' '*'*- 

10th District - Mark Steven Kirk, 

1531 Longworth House Office'Bldt 

Washington, D.C. 20515; (202) 225-4835; or 102 

WilmotRd, Ste., 200. ■.-.:■■■.*■. 

Deerfield.IL 6001 5; (847) 940-0202; 

or 301 W. Washington St., Waukegan,IL 60085; (847) 

662-0101 



j 



it 




- ' 



April 13, 2001 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers / B5 



1 1 



PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE U\KEU\ND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF 
POLITICAL OPINION, IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS 




Moore: 

Awarded top 
scout honors. 






Lultgaarden 

Supportfrom 
people in high 
places. 



Maravelas: 

Shells out bucks 
for his campaign. 




Simpson: 

LooKin* out for 
number one. 



Link: 

Helping other 
Dems get elected. 



Waukegan Republicans 

ponder reorganization 



With a Democrat still in 
the mayor's chair, 
Waukegan Republicans 
are regrouping around 
7th Ward Aid. Pat Needham with an 
eye toward being a force in county 
elections next year besides re-elect- 
ing Congressman Mark Kirk in 2002. 

GOP leaders spiked reports of 
throwing support to Atty. Newton 
Finn, who narrowly lost to CityTrea- 
surer Dan Drew. As a party, 
Waukegan Republicans sat out the 
mayoral election, heeding Needham's 
counsel to "follow your own con- 
science." 

Waukegan Twp. Republican 
Chairman Charles 'Chuck 4 WUlms 
was defeated for re-election as a 
township trustee to give rise to specu- 
lation over future leadership changes. 

Creating confusion in GOP ranks 
was veteran Aid. Larry Denpas* deci- 
sion to pull out of the city clerk race 

after entering the campaign as a Re- 
publican. Telling voters "1 want to be 
your alderman, not city clerk," Tenpas 
still polled 1,409 votes. Tenpas openly 
supported Drew. 

As a footnote to the Waukegan 
election, Drew's success was another 
victory for Democratic strategist Pat 
Bottermon, who has managed cam- 
paigns for State Sen. Terry link (D- 
Vernon Hills) and worked with the 
Illinois Democratic organization. 

Self help 

If you can't help yourself, who 



can? That was the motto of Warren 
Township Supervisor Sue Slmpsoi 
who was listed as the biggest single 
contributor to the slate she headed 
for re-election. 



I 



I 



OT deal 

Lincolnshire officials are patting 
themselves on the back for hard- 
nosed negotiations with the Illinois 
Dept. of Transportation. Mayor Bar- 
bara LaPiana regards IDOTs agree- 
ment to build a four-lane road with a 
double yellow line as a major break- 
through. IDOT also will pay the com- 
plete cost of an underpass at River- 
woods and Half Day Rds. — if the vil- 
lage wants it— not a share deal as 
originally stated. LaPiana told resi- 
dents that it is in IDOTs best interest 
to work with the village. So there. 

Riding high 

Vernon Hills officials have hit on a 
nifty way to dramatize how the Public 
Works Dept. operates. They've invited 
all-comers to an open house 1-3 p.m., 
Sunday, May 20, to take rides on the 
street sweeper and aerial truck. 

Future star 

1\vo veteran distaff Republican 
leaders have tabbed a Ubertyville 
woman for a bright future in politics. 
State Sen. Adeline Geo-Karls (R- 
Zion) and State Rep. Andrea Moore 
(R-Libertyville) went out of their way 
torheip Kerry (Devanie) Lultgaar- 
den in her bid for election as a village 



trustee. Geo-Karis is a leader in en- 
couraging women to run for public 
office. With three to be elected, Luit- 
gaarden ran fourth in a field of five. 

Personal investor 

Businessman Tfeso Maravelas, 

the new mayor of Antioch, preferred 
investing in his own campaign rather 
than doing a lot of fund raising. Mar- 
avelas reportedly put 511,000 into his 
campaign fund and drew on a close 
circle of friends for funding support, 
including Peter Anest, who is in- 
volved in a legal dispute with die Vil- 
lage of Antioch. 

Scouts honor 

1\vo women from Lake County, 
State Rep. Andrea Moore (R-Liber- 
tyviile) and Dr. JoAnn Desmond, 

superintendent of District 112 in 
Highland Park, were honored as 
Women of Achievement by Illinois 

Crossroads Council of Girl Scouts of 
the USA. 

Sought after 

Lt. Gov. Corinne Wood still is 
one of the most popular speakers on 
the political circuit. The Lake Forest 
resident will fill a "home town* invita- 
tion when she addresses the eighth 
annual meeting of the Lake County 
Chamber of Commerce as keynoter 
Thursday, May 8, at Holiday Inn 
Gurnee-Waukegan.The$100 per 
plate event includes installation of 
new officers. 



Ethnic j okes rile some, amuse others 




CORNER 



C-V ne day, while president, Ronald Reagan had a joke 
* he couldn't resist sharing with a friendly pack of 
■ reporters: 
*J "How do you tell the Polish guy at a cockfight? 
He brings a duck. How do you tell the Italian guy? He bets on 
the duck. How do you know the Mafia was there? The duck 

wins." 

An apologetic smile and little tap dance got dear old of them (mosUy 

Ronnie off the hook and he encoun- ....... ...................... — .. ............... 

tered only mild rebuke. He told the ™&-^m TUP DEADD 
nation he was sincerely sorry and that ^E^lfl lilt rrAIfll 

"from now on, I'm going to look over 

both shoulders and then tell stories 

about Irishmen, because I'm Irish." 

The tremendously popular televi- ^^^^ 

sion series. The Sopranos," isn't get- (HHH JenyPfl 
ting off quite so easily. A Chicago legal 

group, the American Italian Defense * 

Association, Is suing Time Warner Entertainment saying the 
show featuring fictional mobster Tony Soprano violates the in- 
dividual dignity clause of the Illinois Constitution. It paints 

Italians as criminals. 

Time Warner replies, "We're hardly alone in our assess- 
ment that 'The Sopranos' is an extraordinary artistic achieve 

menu* 

It has become a cultural phenomenon, attracting some 
10 million viewers in HBO's 32 million homes. Some critics 
say it Is far and away the best show on television. 

It's about ruthless, violent mobsters and full of despica- 
ble language, so it offends some folks but amuses others. 

Also on the ethnic front, a columnist at another newspa- 
per recently found herself with her foot in her mourn after 
she innocently referred to her French friends as Frogs. 

One of the dictionary definitions for frog is a Frenchman 
usually taken to be offensive. 



The columnist agreed mat short derogatory words for 
Germans, Italians and Japanese are clearly slurs, but it's hard 
to imagine anyone getting his knickers in a twist over refer- 
ring to the French as Frogs. 

I happen to be of German ancestry but can't mink of any 
ethnic slurs mat get my underwear in a bundle. Let's see, 
mere's kraut, dummkopf, jerry, etc. I guess IVe been called all 
of mem (mostly in fun, I hope), and since I'm from Wiscon- 
sin I also respond happily to cheese- 
head. 

The late, great Mike Royko did a 
memorable number on ethnic jokes a 
few years ago. Typically tongue-in- 
cheek, Royko responded to a letter from 
a reader who said, "I have noted mat 
you manage to upset just about every 
ethnic and racial group. However, I can't 
remember your ever saying anything 
Infuriating about Scandinavians. In fact, I don't remember 
ever hearing a Swedish joke. Because I am of Swedish ances- 
try, I feel a little hurt at being ignored. So does my wife, who 
has some Norwegian in her background," 

"So," replied Royko, M as much as I abhor ethnic humor, 
just mis once I will grit my teeth and get on with mis dis- 
tasteful business to fulfill mis man's request" 

Royko men printed a lengthy joke about a Swedish guy 
and a Norwegian guy who separately sign up for a luxury 
cruise for $69.95. Bom immediately get wh 
stuffed in barrels and dropped into a river. 

After a while they regain consciousness and find their 
barrels bobbing along together. The Norwegian says: "Good 
afternoon. Tell me, do you happen to know if they serve din- 
ner on this cruise?" 

The Swede shakes his head and says, "No, I don't think 

so. They didn't last year." 



- 1 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Lifestyle at risk 

I attended the public hearing in Beach Park on the proposed 
annexation agreement with DRH Cambridge Homes Inc. It 
appears mat before the year is out Cambridge will be creating 
yet another "community" in Lake County. 
Don't misunderstand, I've owned a home in a Cambridge 
community and my personal experience was a very positive one. 
However, I believe that lifestyle is incompatible with the rural 
lifestyle that I now enjoy. And, that is why, the comments made by 
Hal Francke, attorney for Cambridge Homes, trouble me. 

During the hearing Francke commented that every place 
Cambridge goes, the reactions are similar; that the neighbors al- 
ways predict the "end of the world" but that the "end of the world- 
has n't come yet 

- I am offended by the insensitivity and arrogance of his re- 
marks. 

Certainly these developments are never the end of the world 
for him or for Cambridge Builders Inc., but I would argue passion- 
ately that they ARE the end of the world for some and that is why 
Cambridge is met with opposition wherever they go. 

The rural lifestyle is at risk throughout Lake County and all of 
us who have chosen a rural setting for our lives are vulnerable to 
businesses like Cambridge. 

In Beach Park the changes brought to the area by Cambridge 
will be the end of the world for the two dozen or so surrounding 
property owners. That world now is filled with space and nature, 
stars and coyotes, horses and hay, solitude and freedom, and It 
WILL die. 

Which is why Francke never sees it It happens after he and 
Cambridge have moved on to their next world. 

Linda A Raymond 

Antioch 

Ignoring friendship 

I personally asked the village of Gumee Trustees Don Rudny 
and Tom Chamberlain why they made such a hasty rush to their 
resolution opposing the expansion of gambling in Lake County, 
which was specifically targeted to hinder Waukegan's efforts in 
obtaining a gaming license. Rudny is on record that "this was the 
people's decision." Likewise, Chamberlain fanatically emphasized 
that he would "double his efforts" if he had to do it again. 

Isn't it disturbing to know that our elected officials are willing 
to sacrifice long-time established political relationships for their 
own campaign purposes? Rudn/s Resolution, as it is commonly 
coined, accomplishes nothing but weakens Gumee's opportuni- 
ties to obtain large state and federal funding for cooperative pro- 
jects such as the East Grand revitalization and LakehurstTrain 
Station. Does Gumee mink Waukegan will contribute politically, 
financially or otherwise after receiving such a cold shot? 
Mayor Dick Welton prudently and politely advised that 

Gumee ought to let Waukegan handle its own affairs as Waukegan 
sees fit Welton offers sound advice from a wise leader and politi- 
cian. 

Obviously Rudny and Chamberlain greatly undervalue inter- 
governmental relationships outside their own small political cir- 
cle. We can only hope they have not done so at taxpayers expense. 

David Grosshopf 

Gumee 

Vigilance pledged 

Although we lost our bid for election as Fremont Township 
trustees we want to thank all those who voted for us and those 
who helped With our candidacy. We are proud of how we ran our 
campaign. We came out early in the campaign with our ideas for 
the future of Fremont Township and the incumbents soon em- 
braced those ideas in their campaign literature. Our candidacy 
brought to light many important issues and had we not run, Fre- 
mont Township would have remained quagmired in the same 
mediocrity as In the past, content to let developers control and . 
devour our beautiful green space and farms. The incumbent slate 
won the election but they did not receive a mandate. We look for- 
ward to holding die incumbents to their promises and we will re- 
main vigilant in our efforts to safeguard the future of our Town- 
ship. 

Loraine 'Raine'Ray 

BobBohl 

Fremont Township 

No benefit 

Well, the Governor has unveiled his long-awaited plan for die 
tollways, and once you wade through the long-range promises, 
and the technical talk of defeasement and bonds, you are left with 
one reality— effective Oct 1 , our tolls go up to 75 cents. For that, 
we get less than half the necessary reconstruction and repair that . 
was identified in the toll authority's 10-year plan and a southern 
extension to a road we don't use. We don't get improvements to 
state roads and intersections here that are in dire need of work. 

The plan did not identify the additional costs to IDOT to up- 
grade local roads connecting to the southern extension of 1-355. 
Those funds can only come from (he already stretched IDOT bud- 
get, and leave us short of needed Improvements here. The plan 
did not Identify how the other half of tolhvay reconstruction and 
repair would be funded. We have more and bigger bills lurking in 

ourfuture. 

Any benefits from closed toll plazas don't start in Lake County 
till 2008, and the Eden's ramp plaza is with us until 201& (By the 
way, by then the tolls have gone to 95 cents). The legislative over- 
sight and the elimination of some toll plazas don't happen for 
years, and the ultimate elimination of tolls doesn't happen for 20 
years— well after Gov. Ryan has left office. Since there is no way to 
enforce those promises, they very well may not happen at all. The 
toll increase, however, is immediate and very likely to happen. 

This plan is of no benefit to Lake County at all. We desperately 

need a plan, and the funding, to improve Lake County's roads and 

intersections, NOW. 

Susan Tingle 

Executive Director 
Lake County Conservation Alliance 



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B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 







April 13, 2001 




Rob Backus, Mike Krizman, John Phelps and Steve Peterson contributed to this report 



capsule 



ESCC 



Carmel 

Coach: Jim Gran (1st year) 

Current record: 5-4 

Last year's record: 15-15 

Key returning players: P/SS Theresa Macrowski, 

Sn 1 B Erin Stickley, Sr; CF Emily Sylwcstrak, Jr, C/OF 



Sarali LoBue. So: P/RF Nicole Micrzejcwski, Jr. 
Season outlook: It will be a season of rebuilding Tor 
a team that lost seven starters from last year's 15-15 
club. The pitching staff, led by senior Theresa 
Macrowski, will be the strength of this team. Although 
relatively inexperienced, the lady Corsairs have 
knowledge of the came and arc very coachable. They 
should remain in the middle of the pack In the ESCC 
. throughout the season and will hope to turn some 
heads In the post -season. 
Q ii of cable: We want to stay competitive, get in the 




PRE-SEASON PLAYER OF THE YEAR 

■^ ^ a^ ^ >^ ^^n ^ ^ ^^m 

Emm 

Dominatioii the status quo for MHS' Rass 



By ROB BACKUS 
Staff Reporter 



For Mundelein's Michelle Kass, her senior 
season will be the culmination of a dominant 
career on the mound. 

Her numbers are Pedro Martinez-esque, 
and she keeps getting better. 

InaoOO.KasswentM-ywithaO^lERAin^ 
innings and 198 strikeouts against just 13 walks. 

"Every big game over the past four years, 
she's been the pitcher," said Mundelein head 
coach Ted Juske. 

Kass, nicknamed "The 
Stork" by Juske and her team- 
mates because of her six-foot 
frame, has run into problems 
during her career because of 
herheight "I was prone to ac- 
, cidents," said Kass, who 
sprained her ankle during 
her freshman year after trip- 
ping while carrying groceries. 
"It seemed like I was on 
crutches every other week." 
Even during her fresh- 
man season when she was 
uncoordinated and injury 
prone due to her height, 
Kass was still dominant, go- 
ing 17-4 with a 2.03 ERA and 
125 strikeouts in 131 in- 




Mundelein High School's 
Michelle Kass pitches to Lib- 
ertyville during a 9-0 win. — 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



nings. 

But like Pedro Martinez, Kass has had some 
hard luck on die mound throughout her career. 
In the sectional title game against Stevenson 
during her freshman year, Kass was pitching in 
the final inning when she gave up a game-win- 
ning home run. She has also been on the losing 
end of numerous close games throughout her 
career. Despite a career ERA of around 1.30, 
Kass has still lost 15 games. 

"She's lost a lot of one-run games," said 
Juske. "Sometimes shegets no run support." 

BH[But for Kass the num- 
bers aren't important - she 
just wants to reach the state 
tournament. "Every year you 
hope for success but now it's 
my last chance," said Kass. "I 
want to get to state, to say we 
did it" 

Unlike many high school 
players whose careers end 
upon graduation, Kass still has 
four years to look forward to 
on the mound at either Tru- 
man State in Kirksville, Mo. or 
Augustana in Rock Island 
where she plans to major in 
sports medicine. 

But for now the focus 
remains on high school and 
on the team. 



Kids 

Need 

thinks you'd agree... Heroes 



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2115W,Gelden 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 



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— 




middle of the pack nndput everything together at re- 
gionals."-//^/ coach Jim Gran. 

FOX VALLEY 

Grayslake 

Coach: I- rick Dircks (2nd year) 
Current recordi 2-4 

Last year's record: 14-14 (lost first-round regionnls) 
Key returning players: P Katie Hanvcy, Sr.; 3H/IJ-" 
Katie KraJewskJ.Srj P/CF Kelly Durkin, Sr.; IB Tara 
Mcndralla, Jr.; C Tiffany Tictze, Jr.; Elizabeth Sims, Jr. 
Season outlook: Seven starters are gone for the Hams 
but die incoming com is more than capable of filling 
In the holes. The only thing is they will have to get used 
to playing varsity ball. Winning the close games helps 
build confidence, as well as wins. I lanvcy is solid on the 
mound. She went the distance in a 10-lnning 5-4 
thrilling win over Antioch. Durkin is also steady on the 
mound. She and Hanvey are the aces - both combined 
for all of Uic Rams wias last season with seven apiece. 
The defense should be strong behind them, with Tiet- 
ze behind the plate. Sims and Piascckl in the Infield, 
and Piasecki or Durkin in the outfield. 
Ouotcablc: "The hi tting should come around and 
tne defense will be solid. Our big concern is how fast 
the younger players adapt to varsity pitching. "-Head 
coach Enck Dircks, 

NORTH SUBURBAN 
PRAIRIE DIVISION 

Grant 

Coach: Stacy Petrovich (2nd year) 
Current record: 2-8 
Last year's record: 6- 16 

Key returning players: C Danielle Jakes, Sr, 1 B 
Becky Holcm, Sr, CP Rosa Csultis, So. 
Season outlook: The Bulldogs have displayed plen- 
ty of ofiTcnsc in their two wins, scorting 33 runs.Thcy 
beat Round Lake (10-5) and Wauconda (23- 13). In the 
Wauconda game, Cuitis had key extra-base hits. Se- 
nior Dani Jakes had two hits while pitcher Amber 
Hubka had two extra-base hits while scoring three 
runs. Lauren Mill, a sophomore call-up. doubled. In a 
wild game, Grant took the lead for good with five runs 
in the fifth inning after an 8-8 tie. Wauconda rallied 
from a 20-8 deficit, but Grant held on for the Spring 
Classic win for a 2-1 tourney record. Against Round 
Lake, junior third baseman Jessica Norwick, who 
made a nice play on a game-ending double-play, 
belted a game-deciding grand slam. She also singled. 
Jakes and Csuhlits were 3-for-4 at the plate with a 
triple and an RBI. Mill scored 2 runs. Hubka was the 
winning pitcher in both victories. 
Quoteable: "Rosa did a great job. Hill is a third base- 
man we called up from the sophomore team last 
week. Our offense has been excellent."- Head coach 
Stacy Pctroviclu 

Round Lake 

Coach: BarryGurvey (1st year) 

Current record: 0-10 
Last year's record: 5-20 

Key returning players: IF Jcnni Molueg. Sr.; C/OF 
Kolah Blue, Sr.; P/OF Jenny Powell. Jr.; P/OF Vol En- 
gelhard, Jr.; OF Glna Spear, Sr. 
Season outlook: Familiarity is key for the Panthers 
. th is season. That's because first-year head coach Bar- 
ry Gurvcy, who guided the freshman level for the pre- 
vious nine years, has many of those same players on 
this year's varsity. In other words, this team is young 
but will get belter only by playing. Malueg Is a two- 
year starter while Blue is tne only other senior with 
varsity experience. Spear, the third senior on the 
team, adds depth and speed to the outifield but lacks 
experience. Behind the plate, Blue should help keep 
the young pitching of Englchard, Powell and junior 

Chnstin Hoekstra focused. MBPflH 

Quoteable: "Our juniors were very sound mechan- 
ically the last two years. It will be interesting to sec 
how fast they develop on the varsity level. -Head 
coach Barry Curvey. 



Wauconda 

Coach: Tim Rennels (2nd year) 
Current record: 2-7 
Last year's record: 7-22 

Key returning players: C Laura Mau, Sr.; CF 
Stephanie Loomis, Sr.; SS Jodi Merganthalcr. Sr.; P 
Stephanie Gertr; So. 

Season outlook: Both Wauconda and Grant hoped 
to continue their momentum on offense alter a 23- 1 3 
slugfest, won by Grant in the Spring Classic Waucon- 
da caught Grant at 8-8 and battled back again from 20- 
8 before losing in six innings. Sophomore Stephanie 
Gertz has emerged as Wauconda s ace. Senior Megan 
Gebbard also adds depth on the mound. The always- 
determned Jodi Mercanthaler Is back for her senior 
year. Laura Mau, a senior, who hits clean-up, smacked 
three hits against Grant, including a bases-clearing 
double and two-run single. Jenny Balrd is also hitting 
the ball well, according to Rennets. Juniors include sec- 
ond baseman Joyce Honey. Honey and senior captain 
Stephanie Loomis lead the team in hits early. 
Quoteable: M I am proud of our offense so tar. This is 
onard-workinc group. Unlike last year, they do not let 
one error leaato a multitude of errors. Their funda- 
mentals are solid." -Head coach Tim Rennels. 




Vernon Hills 

Coadu Greg Stilling ( 1st year program) 
Current record: 4 -7 

Last year's record: First season 



Key players: OF Allison Bonncm. Jr,; CF Natalie 
Near, Jr.; P Kim Rymcr, So.; P Maggie Weber, Jr.; OF 
Alison Bonncm, Jr.; C Beth PlucinsW, So. 
Season Outlook: Again, the theme revolves around 
getting that experience. The Cougars have played well 
defensively while the offense lias had no problem 
scoring runs in the early going. Pitching, with Weber 
cmcrginROS the team's ace, will be solid. Weber, also 
the team s best hitters, serves as co-captain along 
with Pluclnski. The first-year program saw some ear- 
ly jitters In an 0-5 start but has begun to find Its 
groove, winners of four of its last she 

Quotable: "We have to start to scorii .„ _. 

Head coach Greg Stilling. 

LAKE DIVISION 

Antioch 

Coach: Jennifer Schultz ( 1st year) 
Current record: 3-6 

Last year's record: 1 1-22 (lost first-round regionals) 
Key Players: P Kristcn Hlstrom, So.; OF Amanda Pol- 
litt, Jr.; IF Sherry Tosscy, Jr.; IF Katie Birk, Sr.; C Laura 
Weber, Jr. 

Season outlook: The Sequoits ore looking to finish 
in the (op half of the North Suburban Conference this 
year by eliminating early season errors that have 
plagued them through the first nine games. Th rough 
those nine games, Antioch has compiled 36 errors 
while striking out 52 times. On the year they have 
scored only 20 runs collectively, giving them a scor- 
ing average of just over two nins per game and hav- 
ing a batting average under .200. Ave re having trou- 
ble batting through our order," said Schultz. Elm* 
strom is clearly the teams ace on the mound. Despite 
a 1-5 record, she's fanned 44 batters while walking 
only four. She also has a 1.14 ERA. Offensively, she 
leads the team with six RBI while Poll it t is batting at a 
300 clip (9-for-30) with one round-tripper. 
Quoteable: "No team has beaten us yet, we're beat- 
ing ourselves." 

Libertyville 

Coach Bob Fox (1 4 th year) 
Current record: 1 -5 

Last year's record 10-21 (lost first round regionals) 
Key returning players: OF/P Stephanie Bollman, 
Jr.; IF Annie Kirschbaum, Sr.; IF Sarali Wright. Sr.; IF 
Courtney Dydo, Sr.; OF Jenna Stork, Sr. 
Season outlook: One wo rd - develop men t. With the 
split of Libertyville and Vernon Hills, the Cots arc def- 
initely in a rebuilding stage as just she players with var- 
sity experience return from fast year's squad. Head 
coach Box Fox, who enters his 14th campaign, will 
have his team concentrate on the basics, especially 
on defense. Kirschbaum, Wright, Dydo, Erin Hofstet- 
ter and Stark all saw time on varsity last year but at dif- 
ferent positions. So far this season, the Cats have been 
in most of their games but the timely contact hitting 
is lacking. Also avoiding the big inning late in the 
game will make the rebuilding process more com- 
forting. 

Quoteable: "We're gonna struggle. We're not really ex- 
perienced, especially in pitching. -Head coach Bob Fox. 

Mundelein 

Coach: Ted Juske 
Current record: 9 -3 
Last years record: 22-8 

Key returning players: P Michelle Kass. Sr.; C Lau- 
ren Bierwirth, Sr.; SS Brandi Simon, Jr.; P/OF Rachel 
Cleaveland, So.; 2B Trista Campbell, Jr. 
Season outlook: 'Hie Mustangs' season will cer- 
tainly ride on the right arm of Michelle Kass (14-7, 
0.91 ERA, 198 K's In 2000) and Mundelein's ability to 
give her run support. The team definitely has the po- 
tential and talent to win the NSC but they need focus 
and discipline to avoid beating themselves. Like" 
many area teams, Mundelein will focus on the little 
things throughout the season in order to prepare for 
its inevitable post-season run. 
Quoteable: The competition has gotten stronger 
and we have to come out ready to play/V/cad coac/i 

Ted Juske. 

Warren 

Coach: Tim Van Hcirseelc 
Current record: 5-1 
Last year's record: 18-13 
Key returning players: P Carrie Nichols, Sr.; CF Joelle 
Thompson, Sy IB Ashlec Browder, Sr.; 3B Tina 
Mrock , Sr.; SS Tracy Michaels, Sr. 
Season outlook: For the first lime in years, the Lady 
Devils will be anchored by offense and not pitching. 
Joelle Thompson. Ashlee Browder, Tracy Michaels 
and Tina Mrock all return to lead Warren in the field 
and provide run support for No. 1 pitcher Carrie 
Nichols. The lack of team speed will hurt the Devils 
on the bases and in the field on occasion but hope- 
fully Warren will be able to overcome that and com- 
pete for an NSC title. 

Quoteable: "We know Stevenson and Mundelein 
will be good but we know we can play ba\\."-Head 
coach Tim Van Heirscele. 



PREDICTED FINISH FOR 
LAKELAND AREA TEAMS 



1. Mundelein 

2. Grayslake 

3. Warren 

4. Round Lake 

5. Antioch 



6. Carmel 

7. Grant 

8. Libertyville! 

9. Wauconda 

10. Vernon Hills 






Good Friday 

Stations of the Cross 12:00 p.m. 

Reconciliation 1:30-2:30 p.m. 

Holy Eucharist 7 : 00 p.m. 

Holy Saturday 

Liturgy of the Word (Food Will Be Blessed) .9:00 a.m. 

Reconciliation 1 1 :00- 1 2:00 p.m. 

Easter Vigil 7 :0 p.m. 

Easter Sunday 

Holy Eucharist .............. .8:00 and 10:00 a.m. 




410 Grand Avenue, Waukegan, IL 60085 





(847) 662-7081 



A 




■* ' ■« 



- * - 



V 







/ 



I 





















MIDWESTERN 
REGIONAL MEDICAL 
CENTER 



Mammogram: $49 

All month, by appointment 

Shop for your health! Visit our Gurnee 
Mills location and have your mammo- 
gram performed by a caring and consci- 
entious imaging specialist. The $49 cost 
includes interpretation of your mammo- 
gram by a board-certified radiologist. 
Results will be sent to your physician. 
Weekday and weekend appointments 
are available. For more information, or 
to schedule an appointment, please call 
856-1220. 

Free Screening: Colorectal 
Cancer Home Test 

Friday, April 27, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Col- 
orectal cancer is one of the most fre- 
quently d _=_« 

and women over age 40. One of the early 
warning signs, hidden blood in the stool, 
may be detected by using a simple do- 
at-home test. Visit the Cancer Resource 
Center during the above hours and re- 
ceive your free kit with instructions for 
use. To reserve a colorectal home test, 

call 856-1220. 



April 13, 2001 




Lakeland Newspapers I B7 




Lake Forest Hospital's lab advances provide 
clearer understanding of individual cancers 





VISTA HEALTH 



Qi Gong Class 

Beginning Thursday, April 19, Qi Gong 
Class will be held at the Vista Surgery 
and Treatment Center, 1050 Red Oak 
Lane (on the Victory Lakes Campus off 
Grand Avenue), Lindenhurst. Qi Gong is 
a powerful form of moving meditation 
that unlocks mental and physical stress 
in the human body. Fee for the 8 week 
class is $80. For information, or to regis- 
ter, call 356-4750. 

Healthy Heart 

The Healthy Heart program is de- 
signed for people who would like to ex- 
ercise in a supervised gym atmosphere. 
The program allows participants to use 
the exercise equipment (treadmills, sta- 
tionary bicycles, rowing machines, etc.) 
of the cardiac rehabilitation program. 
Participants undergo an initial screening 
for cardiovascular risk factors to deter- 
mine whether he/she is at risk for heart 
disease. Following the screening, a per- 
son may be referred to the cardiac rehab 
phase III instead of Health Heart. All 
participants take part in an individual- 
ized orientation to the Health Heart pro- 
gram and its equipment. There is a $40 
fee for this single session. Following ori- 
entation, participants take part in exer- 
cise sessions according to their own 
schedules at a cost of $3.50 per session. 
For a listing of other classes and services 
at the Vista Surgery and Treatment Cen- 
ter, call 356-4700. 



CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER 







Parent to Parent 

' On Wednesday, April 18 at 7 p.m., the 
free Parent to Parent — Families Raising 
Young Children program provides sup- 
port and education for parents concerned 
with child development Condell Day Cen- 
ter for Intergenerational Care. 990-5800. 

New Life Maternity Center 
Boot Camp 

Saturday, April 21 at 1 p.m., the New 
Life Maternity Center Boot Camp for 
New Dads offers the opportunity for 
rookie fathers expecting their first baby 
to learn from veteran dads. Call Perina- 
tal Education, 990r5407. 

Adult Fitness Classes 

Centre Club hosts Adult Fitness Class- 
es from 8:45-9:45 a.m. each Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday at Prairie View 
Park Building, 16652 Port Clinton Rd., 
Vernon Township. This class is the for- 
mer Senior Fitness class that was held at 
the Condell Acute.Care Center in Buffalo 
Grove. A certified Centre Club instructor 
leads exercises to music from the 1940s, 
•50s and '60s. the cost is $3 per class and 
the first class is free. Call Centre Club. 
990-5742 or Vernon Township, 634-4600. 





ancef is a complex and often baffling 
disease. Even after a diagnosis has 
been made, questions remain: What 
is the exact nature of this 
particular cancer? What treatment 

most effective? Now the laboratory team at 
Lake Forest Hospital has developed a 
ticated computerized system called Q 
tive Image Analysis, to give cancer patients 
and their doctors more detailed information 
than ever before possible. The reports can 
subc a t ego rized certain complex cancers, pro- 
definitive diagnoses and prog- 
_ help doctors know which types of 
treatment will be most effective for a particu- 
lar cancer patient 

A woman with breast cancer, for instance, 
will be treated with different chemotherapy 
drugs depending on certain factors about her 
cancer. Breast cancer that Is estrogen depen- 
dent generally is treated with the anti-estro- 
gen tamoxifen, which "blocks" me estrogen 
that these tumors need to grow. A newer 
drug, Herceptin (trastuzumab), targets breast 
cancer cells mat make too much of a nrotein 



called HER-2. To find out if a woman's breast 
cancer is "positive" for these and other deter- 
mining factors, the cancer cells are analyzed 
in the lab using specialized tests. 

The Quantitative Image Analysis system de 
veloped by LFH's laboratory team analyzes the 
individual cells comprising the patient's cancer. 
The resulting report is accurate and objective • 
and strikingly detailed "We now know the exaci 
number of cells that are positive and how 
strongly positive they are," says Richard Oaten, 
MD, PhD, director of hematopathology. "The 
computer gives us information that is ^^ 
dse than a human could possibly provide." The 
information helps pinpoint the exact treatment 
that win most benefit each individual breast 
cancer patient 

These specialized reports also are being 
used for patients with cancer of the prostate, 
bladder, uterus, ovaries, lung and colon. 
Diagnosing leukemia arid ryrripho ma 

The LFH laboratory also has made great 
strides in diagnosing and understanding 
leukemia and lymphoma. "These are ex- 
tremely complex cancers with many subcate- 



gones," says Dr. Clatch. Using a sophisticati 
piece of lab equipment called a Laser Scan 
Cytometer and a special 12-chambered slid 
that he designed. Dr. Clatch has develo 
process to classify the leukemia or lymphoma 
and make a precise diagnosis. From only a 
tiny specimen, the process provides detailed 
information, on a molecular level, about the 
cancer's makeup, enabling the cancer spe- 
cialists to determine the most appropriate 
treatment for that patient 

Dr. Clatch travels extensively to train oth- 
er pathologists on die process, which is being 
used in only a handful or other institutions 
around the country and the world. For more 
information on cancer treatment at Lake For- 
est Hospital, please call 535-6145. 

Lake Forest Hospital is a fully licensed 
and accredited 2 1 vbed community hospital 
offering a complete range of services that are 
staffed by 487 board-certified physicians, 
with offices conveniently located throughout 
Lake County. For information about the hos- 
pital, call 234-5600; for a physician referral, 
. call 535-6171. 





Helping kids too much can actually damage their futures! 



HI Dr. Singer, 

I am calling you for your newspa- 
per column about my sister-in-law. 

She has a child who, I think, Is in line 
for some hard things down the road if 
things don't change. She is not 
amenable to coming to see any profes- 
sional now and I thought if yon could 
answer this question in your column, 1 



ii««»».».Hi»«tH HIM tH —**••*• 



-•••••••< 



• ••♦♦»»•»♦♦< 




VI II 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 



Dr. Sherri Singer 




show it to her and convince her 
to get help now. Her daughter is 7 and 
is very much In a "shell." I believe she 
is in that sheU because everyone does 
things for her and always has. She has 
3 brothers and 1 sister. When someone 
asks her to do something or say some- 
thing, the entire family falls all over it- 
self to answer for her or do the thing 

or her. Consequently, she doesn't 
even try to answer anymore or take * 

anything on. I see her shrinking into 
herself and I don't like IL I have told 

them time after time to let this kid an - 
or herself an d do for herself be- 
cause It will be better for her. They qH 
don 't listen or stop this. I'm afraid that 
she will get worse and worse with time 
If they don't stop and that eventually, 
when she does have to do things for 
herself, she will have no experience 
with It and fall apart. I want to a vo Id 
this tragedy. Am I wrong? H.H. 





Hi H.H., 



Schedule your mammogram for only $49. 



At Cancer Resource Center, we believe that having a mammogram is so important in the early 
detection of breast qncer that we will help you make time for one, by arranging your appointment 
for the next time you shop at Gurnee Mills. Our mammography service is on-site and accredited by 
the American College of Radiology.Our board-certified radiologists will interpret your mammogram 

|B^BSS|B^SH 

and send the results to your physician. To schedule your mammogram, call us at 847-856-1220 



or visit us during regular mall hours for a referral to a physician near you. 



"<#■ 




• -*- 



CANCER RESOURCE CENTER" 

ttwr mmbtf om w*k* foi mm i*d Information ahoW canon 



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AT MDWESTDW REO0NAL MOICAL ONTO* 



» V 






Gurnee Mills • Entrance H • 847-856-1220 

www.cancercenter.com 




No you are absolutely not wrong and I 
appreciate'your effort in trying to help this 
little girl. I also see this everyday in my prac- 
tice and I help lots of people to let their kids 
learn to say and do things on their own. I do 
hope you share my response with your sis- 
ter-in-law. 

The problem is insidious. First, when 
the child is very young and really cannot an 
swer for herself or do for herself, everyone 
helps because it is the family type thing to 
do. But what happens is, the kid who is get- 
ting helped gets the message early on, that 
he or she doesn't have to use any effort to 
get anything or do or say anything. It's easy 
for that child. There is no work or struggle 
involved because everyone else is doing it 
for that child. Think, though, what would 
happen if you got someone else to exercise 
for you. How much weight would you lose 
How firmed up would you be? You would be 

i of the work or struggle so you 
er none of the rewards. It is the 
same with a kid who has everyone doing the 
struggle for him or her, but the child is los- 
ing out on a lot more than a weight issue. 

You are also correct that someday, that 
child will need to use her skills and be inde- 
pendent 7 Unfortunately, in her family's de- 
sire to be helpful, they will have taken away 
her chance at being independent What is 
even harder is that the longer the family 
takes the work and struggle away from that 
child, the harder it becomes for her to do 
anything herself. Therefore, when she tries, 
it looks far more painful than it should and 
in/races the helpful family again, rescuing 
her from her struggle. 

All of our growth comes from'struggle. 
re is no growth without struggle. 



Please see SINGER !BQ 












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B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HEALTHWATCH 



April 13, 2001 



FROM PAGE B7 




SINGER 




This is why I get so nuts when I hear parents 
tell me that they are trying to make it easier 
on their child. It doesn't make it easier on 
the child. It just makes the parents feel bet- 
ter about their relationship with the child, 
for now. Later on, it is nowhere near easy to 
watch a child, who is now an adult, who 
cannot do even the easiest of tasks on his or 
her own because family members raced in 
and made sure it was done for him or her. 
I think the worst case of this I ever saw 
was in my very young days in practice, over 
a decade ago. I used to do Psyche testing in 
the schools. I was supposed to test a boy 
who was suspected of being mute. This is a 
person who does not speak. I started to set 
up my testing equipment while the boy 
watched me. After about 5 minutes of 
watching me, he quietly asked me what was 
in my "suitcase" (testing bag.) I looked at 
him, amazed that he spoke to me and told 



him this: M I was told that you don't ever 
speak. Why do people think that about 
you?" He responded to me by saying, "I 
don't usually have to talk because my old- 
er sister usually does it for me." I about 
fell out of my chair when I hear that, but 
since then have seen lots and lots of it. 
My recommendation at the staffing was 
to stop the sister, from constantly inter- 
vening and make this kid start talking as 
much as possible. 

My advice to you is to show this column 
to your sister-in-law and tell her that the 
best thing she can do for mis child is to 
strongly tell the other kids and anyone else 
who tries it to let this kid do and say for her- 
self. Let her "cut her teeth" at home in a safe 
environment instead of having to wait until 
she is older and out of that home, when it 
may be way to late to change anything. 
None of us should ever be afraid to watch a 



child struggle a bit to gain great skills that 
will help them to be independent and com- 
petent. Try and get her to see me about it. I 
do this at least three times a week and can 
give her some good guidance. Good luck. 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed Clinical 
Psychologist and Childhood Behavior Spe- 
cialist. She regularly ivorks in person with 
many readers of this column, helping them 
to significantly improve their kid's behavior 



and learning skills. Among many other ser- 
vices, she offers a "Parent Survival Training 
class for paren ts. It lasts 3 weeks and has 
, helped countless families to restore good be- 
havior to their kids and peace and quiet to 
their homes! She is the author of, "Why Kids 
Misbehave" and "Raising Kids Wlio Don't ' 
Become Your Worst Nightmare." For an ap- 
pointment or to purchase either of Dr. 
Singer's books, please call (847) 577-8832 or 

(708) 962-2549. 



To Subscribe To Your 
Hometown News 

Call 245-7500 




NEWSPAPERS 




If any of these symptoms sound familiar, let us help you: 



* Headaches 

* Neck Pain 

* Mid-Back Pain 



* Lower Back Pain 
or Stiffness or Pain 



* Sport Injuries 

* Whiplash 

* Auto or Work Related * Numbness or Pain 

Injuries in Arms or **& 



NEW PATIENT SPECIAL! 

X-RAY & EXAIvl 

ExctUiHttX Medical Exiiiil Expires •i-.pJ-OI. 




Dr. Scott Reiser 



m 



Got ready to have fun and Get Healthy LVDL during April! - 
The Library will sponsor the following special programs and events 



5 



ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC & MEDICAL CENTER 

36735 N. Hwy 83, Lake Villa, IL 

265-5600 

* • • 

Auto and Work Related Injuries Excluded, But Covered 100% 



Thursday, April 12 • 7:00-8 :30pm INTRODUCTION TO YOGA Yoga Instructor Bruce Symonds will 
do a lecture and practicum on Yoga. All are welcome to attend. » 

Tuesday, April 17 • 10:00-11 :00amA LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN You've soon the movie, now meet 
the real players! Lake Villa District Library Is proud to present two stars from the All- American Girls 
Professional Baseball League, the loaguo that has been immortalized in the famous film. All are wel- 
come to attond. "" \ y\ 

Thursday, April 19 • 1 :00-2:00pm WHAT'S IN YOUR GROCERY BAG? Join Judy Baron for a lool 
at the basic structures and functions of tho three major food groups. Healthy refreshments will bo 
served. All are welcome to attend. ") \ 

Saturday, April 21 • 9:00-1 0:30am SK FAMILY FUN RUN/WALK Don't miss the first 5K family Fun 
Run/Walk, organized by the Lake Villa District library. Register beginning Monday, April 2 at the Library 
or Lindenhurst Park District office. Registration is free and includes T-shirt (first 200 registrants). 
Wednesday, April 25 • 7:00-8:00Dm SONS OF THE NEVER WRONG IN CONCERT Bruce Roper, 

Sue Domel, and Deborah Lader will bring a smile to your face and make you want to dance with thoir 
harmony and whimsical songs. All are welcome to attond. \. \ \ 

Thursday, April 26 » 7:00-8:00om EATING ON THE RUN Is your life too busy tc^eat well? Wellness 
Innovations will provide the basics needed to develop a sound diet through fast and simple menu items. 
Samples and recipes will bo provided. Registration is limited and begins aprii 5. -Register at tho 
Reference desk or call 356-7711 . 




Moore, th< 



Saturday, April 28 • 10:00am THE HIPHOPPER. ERIN MOORE Join Erin Moore, the hlphopper, for a 
high-energy good time! 'Bring your Jump-ropes and jump along with Erin. Kids and adults will love the 
bouncing, high-Jumping program and learn a bit about fitness as well. Tickets will bo required for this 
program. Register at the Youth Services Desk. Registration began March ' -- - ■ 







Lake Villa District Library 

\\\\ w.l v «ll.«»i k •* MHI| KiihI < ■i-iiiitl Avi*ihii< • l«||tt«< Villa. II. IMIflMl • &WU77I I 









Your state of health can have a profound 
influence on your lifestyle activities. By taking * 
care of yourself with healthy living, you can 
enjoy the benefits of more energy, tnore 

* ■ 

alertness, and even greater physical capabilities. 

With the help of the Health & Fitness Institute, 
you'll do more than just Imagine the Possibilities 
of an enhanced lifestyle, you'll Experience 

the Possibilities! 

- 

: Call today, or stop by at either location for our 
Open House, April 21. 



Come check 




Free food 

Prizes 

Drawing for 

free membership 






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• 




Lake Forest 



* - 

Lindenhurst 



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847/535-7000 847/535-7500 






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Affiliated with Lake Forest Hospital Foundation 



www.lflifi.com 



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April 13, 2001 




Lakeland Newspapers / B9 




gardening improve your health this spring! 




Turn on the television at any time of day 
and you'll be bombarded with ads for pills, 
powders, drinks, and exercise gizmos that 
promise to help you shed excess pounds. But 
before you shell out $50 for the "Chub-Buster 
5000," get out your gardening gloves. B< ^^ 
health can be as close as your backyard. 
Weed Away Your Weight 

Spring and summer gardening can be a 
great whole-body workout to shed extra win- * 
ter weight Weight-bearing activities such as 
digging and lifting can build muscle, and aer- 
obic activities such as raking, mowing and 
hoeing can bum calories. A 180-pound per- 
son will use 202 calories during 30 minutes of 
digging, spading and tilling.* Even 30 minutes 
of cutting the grass on a riding mower burns 
101 calories. Other calorie burners include:* 

•Raking (30 minutes) 162 

• Planting trees (30 minutes) 182 

• Trimming shrubs, manually (30 min- 
utes) 182 

• Laying sod (30 minutes) 202 

• Weeding (30 minutes) 182 
•Turning compost (30 minutes) 250 
As with any exercise, it's important to 

warm up and stretch before you begin ear- 
dening or yard work. Vary your activiti 
avoid overusing specific muscles. To p 
back injuries, bend from the knees when yo 
rake and hoe or when you lift heavy objects 
such as bags of potting soil. 

You'll also want to protect yourself from 
excess sun exposure. Wear a hat and use a 
sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Drink 
adequate fluids to avoid becoming dehydrat- 




ed, an 



o someplace cooler if you feel 



yourself getting overheated. 
Dig for Your Bones 

There's even more good news for green 
thumbs. According to a 2000 University of 
Arkansas study that compared many forms of 
exercise, yard work is most significant for pre- 
venting osteoporosis in women age 50 and 
older. Researchers compared yard work to bi- 
cycling, aerobics, dancing and weight train- 
ing. Yard work and weight training were the 
only two activities shown to be significant for 

maintaining healthy bone mass. 

The Fruits of Your Labor 

The best part of gardening may be the ed- 
ible rewards. A summer's bounty of fruits and 
vegetables contains fiber that may reduce 
your risk for colon cancer, as well as antioxi- 
dants and phytochemicals mat may reduce 
your risk for heart disease and some cancers. 
Fruits and vegetables are also low in fat, 
which can help with weight loss. The Ameri- 
can Dietetic Association recommends that 
adults get at least three to five servings of veg- 
etables, and two to foiir servings of fruits each 




>ur servin] 
irdenine/ 




day. 

•Source: National Gardening Association, 
www.nationalgardening.com. 
Courtesy of ARA Content, 
www.aracontent.com, e-mail: info@aracon- 
tentcom 






Turn on the television at any time of day and you'll be bombarded with ads for pills, 
powders, drinks, and exercise gizmos that promise to help you shed excess pounds. 
But before you shell out $50 for the 'Chub-Buster 5000/ get out your gardening 
gloves. Better health can be as close as your backyard. 





Will eating like a 
rabbit really improve 
your vision? 

We ve all heard the myths about eyesight 

— or are they really myths? Sitting too close to 

the television, reading in dim light, eating car- 
rots — we've all heard at least one of those at 

one time in our lives. But is there any truth to 
the myths or are they just old wives tales? Ac- 
cording to Michael Lawrence Cohen, vice 
president of Professional Services, following 
are some common myths and facts: 

•Sitting too close to the television will 
damage your eyes. Myth. Many people sit too 
close to the television because they can't see 
well, but sitting too close will not make your 
eyesight worse. 

•Reading in dim light will damage your 
eyes. Myth. Poor lighting will cause eye strain 
and fatigue, but not permanent damage. 

•Reading fine print for a long period of 
time will damage your eyes. Myth. You may 
experience eye fatigue, but no permanent 
damage will be created. To rest your eye mus- 
cles, look at something as far away as possi- 
ble. (Ideally out a window) 

•Ah eye examination is necessary only if 
you're experiencing difficulty seeing. Myth. 
Your eyes should be examined on a regular 
basis to check for eye disease and changes in 
your eye sight In addition, diseases like high 
blood pressure and diabetes can be detected 
with an eye exam. 







LASER HAIR REMOVAL • LASER VEIN REMOVAL • SCLEROTHERAPY • DERMABRASION • MICRODERMABRASION 









. 



LASER HAIR / VEIN REMOVAL 



OBAGI SKIN RESTORATION 
MICRODERMABRASION 



" 



• 






> TCA CHEMICAL PEI 
OFFICE SURGERIES 

COLLAGEN 

BOTOX 




FREE Educational Session 
Sat., April 28, 2-4 pm 









Plastic & Reconstruction Surgery 
Dermatological Surgery 



Laser Treatments 
Round table discussion, new ideas 

Refreshments R.S.V.R 





Cosmetic Surgery & Laser Center 



WWW, 




BOTOX 



W. Northwest HWY, Lake Barrington, IL 60010 (1/2 block west of Kcisey) 



TCA PEEL • GLYCOLIC PEEL • FACELIFT •_ TUMMY TUCK .LIPOSUCTION • BREAST ENHANCEMENT ■ PHYSICIAN STRENGTH 







■ 







• -»». — .. + r 



-*»-*. • * ♦■«»*%•-*• A-« • -. . . .. 






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B10 I Uikelancl Newspapers 



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- 



9 . • - » ' t . • - 

SPORTS 



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April 13, 2001 ' 



' ♦• " f %f 












• 






Pitching helps Lancer baseball click on all cylinders 






By MIKE KRIZMAN 
Correspondent 






When the College of Lake County baseball 
team faced Oakland on April 10, they were gr> 
ing up against one of the top teams in the Sky- 
way Conference. When the day was over, the 
Lancers had swept a double header. 

Behind a strong pitching performance 
from Warren graduate Matt Mitchell in die first 
game, CLC came away with a 2-1 victory. 
Mitchell allowed only three harmless singles 
while striking out seven. It was a remarkable 
accomplishment against a team that had a .380 
batting average coming into the game. 
. "He (Mitchell) throws around 90 mph and 
doesn't walk many guys," Lancer coach Gene 
Hanson said. "He's just a very dominant pitcher." 

CLC took the lead early in the game. In the 













College of Lake County's Matt Mitchell 
pitches against Oakton in a home game 
April 10. The Lancers swept the Raiders 
in doubleheader action. — Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



top of the first, Adam Miller reached base on a 
Ieadoff single. He would eventually score from 
third on a wild pitch, putting his team ahead, 

1-0. 

Oakton would later tie the game in the top 
of the third, but CLC came right back in the 
bottom half of that inning. Brett McCollum 
scored from third on a single by Jason Schiller 
for the eventual winning run. 

In the second game, CLC would win again, 
this time by a score of 4-0. 

The Lancers took the lead in die second in- 
ning when Steve Weidner drove in Schuler on 
a single. Later in the fifth, McCollum doubled 
and eventually scored on a Dave Paddock sin- 
gle. Paddock would eventually score later in the 
inning off the bat of Rhett Kivland. 

CLC picked up another insurance run 
when Chris Draska led off die sixth inning with 
a triple. Adam Donohoe's squeeze bunt even- 
tually drove in the run for the game's final score. 

"I think the difference today was our in- 
tensity level was much higher," Hanson said. 
"Earlier in the year we lost to some teams that 
we probably shouldn't have lost to because our 
heads weren't in the game. But everyone came 
to play today." 

The win gave the Lancers an overall record 
of 4-2 in the conference and 23-8 overall. On 
top of diat, the Lancers beat a formidable con- 
ference opponent. That's something Hanson 
would like to see continue. 

"If we're going to have a shot at the confer- 
ence title, we can't lose anymore conference 
games," he said. "We have to keep playing like 
we did today." 






Other CLC action 

Women's Softball 

The Lady Lancers (10-9, 3-3 Skyway) con- 
tinue to hover around the .500 mark after a 2-2 









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week in which they were swept by Moraine 
Valley in a doubleheader and bounced back to 
sweep Marquette in a doubleheader. 

In the first game against Marquette all nine 
starters had at least one hit as the Lady Lancers 
won the game 14-5. Stacie Peterson (4-for-4, 
four runs, 2 RBI), Amy Springer (3-for-3, four 
runs, 2 walks, two stolen bases) and Kaeleen 
O'Connell (3-for-5, one run, one RBI) led CLC. 
Maggie Stewart, Kristen Pagano, Tiffany 
Sourmeier and Nancy Bleim each had two hits 
and Brooke Pollard jacked out her fourth home 
run of the season. O'Connell (3-1) went the dis- 
tance, surrendering five hits, one earned run 
and two walks while striking out three. 

CLC won the bottom half of the double- 
header 15-4 in five innings. Tiffany Paddock (5- 
5) went the distance giving up eight hits and 
four runs with one strikeout.- 

Peterson (3-for-4, three runs, two RBI), Pol- 
lard (3-for-4, two runs, two RBI), Bleim (2-for- 
2, one run) and Krista Hauck (2-for-4, one RBI). 

'Today we hit," said head coach Sue Garcia. 



Men's tennis 

The Lancers remained winless on the 
young season (0-4) after losses to Joliet and 
North Central College. 

CLC played very well against Joliet but 
came up short 6-3. Dan Clarke had an out- 
standing match, besting his opponent 6-4, 1-0 
in a default. Clarke later teamed up with Dan 
O'Connel to win 8-6 in a doubles match. 
Jimichacl Slaby and Andy York won their first 
match of the season by a score of 8-5 and York 
went on to play a tough match at No. 6 singles 

but lost 4-6, 7-6, 7-6 (7-2). 

Against North Central College the Lancers 
were swept 9-0. O'Connel played an outstand- 
ing match but lost by a score of 6-4, 6-0. 
New and Notes 

The CLC athletic department has an- 
nounced it has coaching openings for men's 
basketball, men's tennis, women's tennis and 
women's volleyball. Interested parties should 
contact Athletic Director Gene Hanson at 543- 
2046.— Rob Backus contributed to this report 















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Homeless" to benefit the Chicago Coalition for 
the Homeless (CCH). 

The event will occur on Saturday, April 19 
at 9 a.m. at the east entrance of Lincoln Park 
Zoo at Fullerton and Cannon Dr. 

Celebrity participants include Bobby En- 
gram, Brian Urlacher, Jim Flanigan and James 
M Big Cat" Williams of the Chicago Bears. Post- 
event activities include an autograph session 



with the celebrity participants, a free Kid's 
Dash competition, an awards ceremony, a raf- 
fle and plenty of refreshments. 

Pre-registration forms can be obtained 
prior to April 1 1 by calling Chicago Special 
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iting www.chicagoevents.com. Pre-registra- 
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The race is Chicago Area Runners Association 
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HOME IMPROVEMENT 



• » . 



April 13, 2001 






Lakeland Newspapers / B1 1 







spurs 



move to owner 




Buying a home is usually one of the 
largest investments that people make 
and it's up to the individual to determine 
if the benefits of buying outweigh those 
of renting. 

Financially buyers must make a down 
payment, cover closing cos 
costs and property taxes, all items that 
renters do not have to worry about. Also, 
the actual upkeep of the house and prop- 

the sole responsibility of the 
homeowner, both physically and finan- 
cially. 

However, there are many financial 
benefits to buying that cannot be 
achieved through renting. The physical 
purchase in itself is an investment. If the 
home is bought in a growing area, the 
property will appreciate in value while 
the mortgage cost stays constant. This 
can allow homeowners to eventually sell 
for more than the original purchase 
price. Besides the home being an invest- 
ment, many homeowners site tax bene- 
. fits as a main reason for switching to 
buying from renting. 

Along with the financial benefits of 
owning a home come the emotional re- 
wards as well. "Buying seemed like a nat- 
ural progression for us for many rea- 
sons," said Jeff Bohmcr. a homeowner on 
the Southwest side of Chicago. "We now 

fell much more a part of the community 
since we have a vested interest in the sur- 



rounding area and we are much less re- 
stricted as far as decorating and land- 
scaping and we can truly call It home." 

Privacy, and the idea of living on your 

erms - not your landlord's - are also 

reasons for choosing buying over renting. 

The overall trend from renting to 
buying in the Chicagoland area can be at- 
tributed to multiple factors, but one of 
the main reasons seems to be the over- 
whelming numbers of condominium 
conversions and new construction being 
developed. 

Since the early 1990's, close to 8,000 
major rental units in Chicago have been 
converted to condominiums, according 
to the Appraisal Research Counselors 
Ltd. Also, many people are finding that 
rent in the Chicago area is sometimes as 
high as a mortgage payment that they 
could be making on a house. This point; 
as well as the realization that many mort- 
gage lenders are only requiring buyers to 
put as little as three to five percent down, 
makes buying very attractive to those 
paying higher rents. 

The decision to buy is not easy, but in 
the long-term, real estate provides a solid 
investment. "Buyers should use all available 
resources to And the home that is right for 
them, said MacKinnon. "Ultimately, buyers 
will And what they are looking for and will 
be able to begin reaping the benefits of be- 
ing a homeowner." 





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Good looking, good living 

These two photos illustrate why attached homes with creative exteriors and user- 
friendly floor plans continue in popularity in the Lakeland area. Exterior photo shows 
styling incorporating rowhome, villa and condominiums. Interior photo illustrates 
upgrades including hardwood flooring and nine-foot ceilings. Photos are from South 
Commons, Deerfield, where buyers get a full basement, private patio off the fam- 
ily room and an attached two-car garage. 









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Beautifully remodeled 2 bedroom. I bath single- 
level condo in Vacation Village. New oak kitchen 
with breakfast bar. built-in microwave & range. 
Fresh paint, new carpet in bedrooms and rcmod- 
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B 1 2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME MARKETER 



April 13, 2001 






Consider refinancing to consolidate debt 



When the economy slows down, many 
Americans become more concerned about 
paying off debt. 

Consumer debt now stands at an all-time 
high, accounting for 23, 3 percent of income 
in 2000, up from 15,8 percent in 1990, accord- 
ing to Dr. Sung Sohn, chief economist of 
Wells Fargo & Company. Moreover, credit 
card borrowing has doubled, surpassing $37 
billion. 

M In today's society, it's relatively easy to 
access credit and take on a considerable 
amount of debt. Unfortunately, it's not as 
easy to pay off that debt," said Cheryl 
Brinkman, area manager for the Grays lake 
area of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. "Many 
Americans, however, are beginning to lever- 
age their biggest asset — their home — to pay 
off or to consolidate high interest debt, such 



as credit cards or car loans." 

Debt consolidation loans have become a 
common option for consumers seeking to 
lower total interest paid on debt and to re- 
duce required monthly payments. There are 
two main types of debt consolidation loans — 
secured, which require collateral or unse- 
cured, which do not require collateral. 

A secured loan that uses equity in a home 
as collateral is a home equity loan or line of 
credit. Home equity loans are generally avail- 
able with fixed interest rates, while home eq- 
uity lines typically offer variable interest rates, 
which can be very competitive when interest 
rates are low. Home equity financing is typi- 
cally less expensive than unsecured con- 
sumer loans and the interest may be tax de- . 
ductible. 

"We're seeing more and more consumers 



take advantage of a home equity loan or line 
of credit for everything from debt consolida- 
tion to home improvement projects," 
Brinkman said. "By doing so, they're able to 
pay off other debts that cost more due to 
higher interest rates. In addition to saving on 
interest, they may lower their monthly pay- 
ments and qualify for tax deductions." 

Cash-out refinancing has become anoth- 
er viable solution for homeowners to consoli- 
date debt. Consumers who have equity in 
their home can refinance an cxistmg mort- 
gage for a larger sum. This allows homeown- 
ers to pay olf the old mortgage and apply the 
extra cash toward higher-interest debt, or to 
pay for things such as a college education, a 
home improvement project, vacation or a 

new car. 

Brinkman provided the following ex- 



ample to demonstrate a cash-out refi- 
nance: A homeowner needs $50,000 to re- 
model a kitchen. In reviewing their fi- 
nances, the homeowner owes $100,000 on 
a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage at 8.5 per- 
cent on a home valued at $200,000. In- 
stead of obtaining a home equity loan, the 
homeowner could refinance $150,000 at 
around 7 percent. The homeowner would 
use $100,000 to pay off the existing mort- 
gage and receive $50,000 in cash to pay 
for the remodeling expenses. 

"Today's homeowners are finding cash- 
out refinancing is a great way to consolidate 
debt, particularly in a decline interest rate en- 
vironment," Brinkman said. "And, unlike 
some other forms of debt, the interest on the 
mortgage has the advantage of being tax de- 
ductible." 




Ponds, decks, landscaping entice condo shoppers 



The appeal of Village Green condomini- 
ums is enhanced by ponds, sundecks and a 
large number of ornamental trees and 
shrubs as well as a landscaped, European- 
style courtyard. Together with large open 
green spaces it will create a cohesive envi- 
ronment for Lincholshire, explains Helen 
Weiss, a principal of Weiss Development 
Corp. 

"The development plan provides lovely 
views and bicycle and pedestrian links to 
the community's trail system that serves as 
an informal recreational amenity and an- 
other way owners can enjoy the surround- 
ing natural beauty," she noted. Other recre- 
ational amenities will include an outdoor 
swimming pool with a sundeck, an exercise 
facility and a community room. 

"There is one more amenity that is 
equally exciting to us and Village Green 
owners and that is the dramatic evolution of 
Lincolnshire itself," said Weiss. 

"After much thoughtful study and the 
adoption of a single comprehensive plan, 



what was long been a quiet, affluent bed- 
room community is now creating lis first 
downtown — an active and attractive fo- 
cal point of village life. And just a few 
steps from Village Green Condomini- 
ums." 

She continued: "We've worked closely 
with the village so that our building design 
and materials complement those of the 
downtown plan. We're pleased to be an in- 
tegral part of Lincolnshire's future and to 
know that a walk along tree-lined boule- 
vards will take our residents to fine retail 
stores, excellent restaurants and conve- 
niences such as a grocery, pharmacy and 
bank." 

Luxurious interior appointments in 
Phase II (Building C) include formal entries 
with coffered ceilings and ceramic tile and 
wood floors, a choice of berber or plush car- 
peting in living areas, 8'0" ceilings in living 
areas, 14-foqt ceilings in penthouse units, 
fireplaces (per plan), bay windows with 
light transoms (per plan), and much more. 



Kitchens include European-style cabi- 
netry, pantries, solid-surface counter tops, 
ceramic tile floors, and jenn-Air appliances 
including self-cleaning gas ranges with 
sealed burners, built-in microwave ovens, 
side-by-side refrigerators with icemakcrs, 
dishwashers and disposers. Double-bowl 
Kohlcr porcelain sinks and faucets are also 
standard. Several breakfast rooms lead to 
private terraces. 



Luxurious all-Kohlcr master baths in- 
clude soaker tubs, separate shower enclo- 
sures, double-bowl vanity tops and recessed 
medicine cabinets. 

Life-safety features include an inter- 
com/closed-circuit security system to the 
lobby, fully sprinkiercd residences and com- 
mon areas, alarmed smoke detectors, 
sound-resistant technologies and barrier- 
free design elements throughout. 



Coming next month! 



MEDIA 



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dprff 13, 200i 



HOWIE MARKETER 



_ _ 

Lakeland Newspapers / B 1 3 









Villa 




Three successful years after opening 
RE/MAX Grand In Ingleside, broker/owners 
Susan Gust and Carolyn Theesfield have 
opened a second RE/MAX Grand office at 
101 S. Milwaukee Ave. in Lake Villa. 

The new Lake Villa office, seven miles 
cast of the Ingleside location, puts Gust and 
Theesfield in the spot they initially targeted 
three years ago when opening their busi- 
ness. 

"Lake Villa was our first choice at that 
time, but we just couldn't find a suitable site 



for our office so we decided to go west and 
establish ourselves in the Fox Lake/Ingle- 
side area," said Gust. "When we learned that 
a s dp center was available in Lake Villa, we 
moved quickly to acquire it and set up a sec- 
ond office." 

The new 2,000-square-foot office initial- 
ly will be a mix of private and semi-private 
offices, plus two conference rooms, and will 
accommodate up to 20 agents. However, ex- 
pansion space is available to eventually 
double that capacity. The office offers a 










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owning a condominium is 

- 

a big advantage" 





Buying at The Courts of Fairfield 
Village can be a smart move. 
Modestly priced, our court 
homes are easily financed 
with as little as 3% down. 
Your monthly payments 
can be lower than 
many rentals. 



Court home living of- 
fers everything you 
need, inside and out. 
Quality Curiat construction 
is maintenance free. 





- 

Surrounded by over 23 acres of 
nature preserves arid private 

ponds, you are only minutes 

from the Chain O'Lakes, 

Golf Courses, Curnee 

Mills, Metra Train 

Station and business 

districts. You can 

* 

keep plenty busy 
do nothing at all! 

Call for more informa- 
tion, or visit our furnished 
models. Make your smart 
move today! 



Location Map 




.GRAND OPENING 
PRICED FROM 





Air Conditioning 

Dishwasher/Disposal 

Range/Refrigerator 

Wall-toAVall Carpeting 

Mini-blinds 
nsulated Windows & 

847 J40.571 

: our website: www.ci 






Patio Doors 
Private Patio or 
Balcony 
Storage Closet^ 
* Sprinkler System 
Garage with Most Units 








Canal 





range of high-tech features, including digital 
scanners and high-speed Internet access. 

The Ingleside office had just three 
agents when it opened, but now has 19. 
agents plus support staff. 

"We think there is a great opportunity to 
grow our business in the Lake Villa/ Linden- 
hurst area, which has become the focus of 
significant new residential and commercial 
development," said Gust. "We are now in 
the heart of one of Lake County's most dy- 
namic growth corridors, and we also serve 



Wisconsin because several agents in the of- 
fice are licensed there, as well as in Illinois. 
Because we are active in a number of dis- 
tinct market areas, we are members of three 
Realtor boards and four multiple listing ser- 
vices." 

Licensed in both Illinois an Wisconsin, 
Gust is a resident of Lake Villa. She received 
her real estate license in 1990 and joined the 
RE/MAX organization in 1993. Theesfield 
because an agent in 1989 and joined 
RE/MAX in 1991. She lives in Antioch. 



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CALL GARY C 

(847)305-3000 ext.i 






Antioch's 0! 



2$ 



Volume Office in No 



532 Lake Street, Antioch, IL 



ourity & Kenosha 



sa MLS. 






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SHANGRI1A WATERFRONT 

Gorgeous wooded lot on the water. 3 story house with 
walkout basement. Fireplace, garage. Large 3rd floor *- 
room for 3 bedrooms. Just needs finishing. 

§194,500 
Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 xl52 



i ' 



HUGE CORNER LOT 

With 2 bedroom ranch, vaulted ceilings in kitchen, 
living room it dining room. 2 car garage. Close to 
schools and shopping in McHenry. 

^^^$132,900 

Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 xl52 



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FOX RIVERFRONT 

Wooded private setting on deadend road. Newer sea- 
wall, fenced yard. 2 car garage. 3 bedroom house with 
front porch overlooking the river to the Chain O'Lakes. 

$1^900 

Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000x162 



NEWER BI-LEVE 

With 3 bedrooms. 2 baths, living room, kitchen* family 
room, garage, sliders to deck and patio. All on a quiet 
deadend street Spring Grove. 

$154,900 

Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 x!52 



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BRAND NEW) 

In new subdivision In Twin Lakes, huge family room 
w/fireplace, formal dining room, central air, 25 car 
attached garage, full basement, 3 bdrms., 2.5 baths. 
CotnpleUoninMuch. $159l9 00 

Call Cary Cybul 












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3/4 WOODED ACRE 

Site in Antioch w/oversized tri-Ievel, 3 bdrro, 3 baths, ret 
room, family room, dining room, Florida room, 10 rooms 
total. Room to roam, hardwood floors, fireplace & appli- 
ances. - 1 '"' 

— ^ " ~"194 900 

Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 xl52 



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FOX LAKE TOWNHOUSE 

This 2 Bedroom, 25 bath townhome w/private pier 
slip on Pistakee Lake has many upgrades: ficldstone 
fireplace, Pergo floor, full basement, garage & much 
much more! *.«*%« *.*»** 

$139,500 

Call Carv Cvbul 847-395-3000 xl52~~ 















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WILMOT FARMS 

Subdivision in Spring Grove, brand new 2£00 sq. ft 
colonial, 4 bdrms., 25 baths, 3.5 car garage, full base- 
ment, workshop, fireplace, 1st floor laundry, oak cabi- 
nets, sitting on over 1 acre site. Immediate occupancy! 

$234,900 

Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 xl52 




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RANCH ON ACRE 

In Antioch, older home, needs some TLC but the 
potential is here. 3 Bedrms, enclosed porch, laun- 
dry mi, 2-car garage. All on wooded acre lot 

^\ $127,500 

Call C ary Cybul 847-395-3000 x!52 



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HILLSIDE RANCH 

With walkout lower level oh double wooded lot in 
Salem, lake rights to Hooker Lake, vaulted ceilings. 
fireplace, heated garage, 4 bdrms, 2 decks. Hurry.! 

$129,900 

Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 xl52 



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B 1 4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME MARKETER 



April 13, 2001 



■ 

'Volcanoes' invite insects 
disease in tree trunks 



? 



Spring is in the air and 
so is the flurry of home 
remodeling projects 



•Protect trees adjacent to construction ar- 
eas by. fen ring off root zones. Remember that 
roots are rarely deeper than 24 inches, with 
the majority of the most valuable roots in the 
top six inches of soil. These roots extend out a 
minimum one and a half times the width of 
the branch canopy. If cqufpment.absoIutely 
must pass over root areas, spread a thick layer 
(12-inch minimum) of wood chips to help ab- 
sorb the weight. Always have an arborist/hor- 
ticulturist involved in the early planning 
stages of the project. 

•Avoid putting steep mounds of soil or 
mulch up against the trunks of trees, creating 
"volcanoes." Though unsightly and unnatur- 
al, it also invites insects and promotes dis- 
eases. Keep the soil or mulch at the natural 
ground level around the base of trees, orna- 
mentals and shrubs — no more than three 
inches deep. 

•Divide perennials to prevent crowding, 
loss of vigor, and vulnerability to diseases. 



Many, such as iris and lilies, benefit from be- 
ing divided about every three years. 

•Consider a professional Plant Health 
Care maintenance program, using a year- 
long, systematic and preventive approach in- 
stead of reacting to insect and disease prob- 
lems as they occur. Many landscape and tree 
care companies offer this program. 

•Apply pre-emergent crab grass herbicide 
to turf, carefully following instructions on the 
product label. To reduce cost and overappli- 
cation, apply only along hard surfaces and 
over last year's known infested areas. Do not* 
apply herbicides to turf areas that you plan to 
reseed. 

•Consider planting narcisus, hyacinth 
and sciila bulbs next fall if animals are eating 
your emerging tulips and crocuses this spring. 
There are no proven substances to keep ani- 
mals away. 

ILCA offers the free color brochures, 
"Your Landscape Begins With A Dream," for 
planning, budgeting and creating outdoor 
spaces and "Garden Centers Are 'Natural* Re- 
sources," with guidance in garden center se- 
lection. Included is a list of member land- 
scape contractors and garden centers. Call 
Monday through Friday 630-472-285 1 , write 
ILCA, 2625 Butterfield Road, Suite 204W, Oak 
Brook, IL 60523 or e-mail lodell@ilca.net. 



Renting advantages cloud 
long run buy benefits 



In the past couple of years, Chicagoland 
residents have been witness to a red-hot real 
estate market with sellers asking top dollar 
and buyers willing to pay. 

The drive to buy while prices soar is seen 
In the countless condo conversions in the city 
and the new subdivisions popping up in the 
suburbs. The year 2000 saw a strong, stable 
economy and a low unemployment rate. 
These factors, coupled with reasonable inter- 
est rates, attracted many people in the area to 
own real estate. 

The homcownership rate in the country 
is now at an all-time high. Of the total num- 
ber of households in the United States, more 
than 65 percent arc owner occupied. There 
have never been so many people willing to 
act upon their desires to own a home of their 
own. Renters arc utilizing the wealth of infor- 
mation available to them to examine the ben- 
efits of both renting and buying; and many 
are seeing that buying offers them advan- 
tages that may never be achieved through 
renting. 

For many young people living in the 
Lakeland area, renting has become their 
first option because of a lack of money 
saved and frequent moves. Benefits of 
renting include not having to cover a down 
payment or property taxes. Monthly pay- 



ments arc usually less and renters are not 
directly financially responsible for the up- 
keep of their home. 

Those who rent are able to use their extra 
money each month to pursue other invest- 
ment options, but as a downside, they receive 
no financial return on their monthly rent 
payment. Some renters begin to see renting 
as a financial setback when decent apart- 
ments are difficult to find at a reasonable 
price. 

While there are benefits of renting that 
are attractive, It tends to be a stepping-stone 
toward buying for many people. 

People are often driven into the home 
buying market once they realize that their 
monthly rent payments hold no benefit for 
them in the long run. 

"There are more resources available to- 
day to help younger people realize that buy- 
ing holds financial advantages and may be a 
better option for them down the road," said 
Vicki MacKinnon, associate for Coldwell 
Banker Residential Brokerage. Renters are 
limited by not having the ability to build eq- 
uity and may also be faced with rent increas- 
es that outpace the Inflation rate. While rent 
increase with time, fixed-rate mortgages stay 
the same, so they become less per month in 
the long-term. 








MLS. 




Advantage 



Cfatfdi 



An Independent Member Broker 
All Financing Subject to Change 



532 Lake St. Antioch 

(847) 395-9588 

Visit our website at: www.georgebessette.com 

CALL TODAY FOR A FREE MARKET ANALYSIS. 



Working 

Twice as 

Hard... 

Illinois and 

Wisconsin 




George Bessette 
GRI, CML 




6 Acres M-l Zoning 

4000+ sq. ft. btock building. Over 300 ft. of Rt. 
83 frontage - high visibility - sower and water. 
Hard to find zoning for many uses. Priced at 
$595,000. 

Coil CMfM Bessette at 847-395-9588 



mm 




New Bl-Level 

Location, price, quality. You have It all. 4 BR, 2 
baths, attached 2 car garage, oak trim and 
kitchen cabinets. Lake Is just a bllck away. 
Great buy at $142,900. 

Call George Bessette at 847-395-9588 






<f,3f ficUS 




9.25 Acres 

■ 

ft 

Act fast on this rolling 9+ acre delight. Already 
perked and ready to go. Just north of Antioch If 

Priced at $94,900. ■;*:■< * •'.- 

Coll George Bessette at 847-395-9588 

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■ » "if 

" u Developments - 2 Houses 

One acre with frontage on Rt. 83. Great po- 
tential with high traffic location. Sewer and wa- 
ter. Many potential uses. Priced at $400,000. 

Coil George Bessette at 847-395-9588 




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Custom Built Bl-Level 

Wonderful open floor plan on a dead end street 
close to lako. It Is a true delight with oversized 
2,5 car garage, oak cabinets In the kitchen, 3 
bedrooms and 2 futl baths. Priced at $142,900 

Call George Bessette at 847-395-9588 





Rare 5 Aero Capo Cod 

This wonderful cape cod sits on 5 acres of pris- 
tine beauty. 4 bedrooms, attached heated 
workshop, polo bam, huge oaHn kitchen. Call 
for your private showing. Priced at $31 9,900. 

Call George Bessette at 847-395-9588 



■ <*m 



Starting Out Or Slowing Down? 

This cozy ranch home is located just off the lake, 
Featuring two. bedrooms, all appliances and a 
one year home warranty. This one won't last 
long. Priced at $69,900. '■' k - 

Call George ******** at 847 




Ranch + Lake-rights!! 

Enjoy this 3 bedroom ranch just a short block 
to lako. Attachod 2 car garage and dock. Call 
today for your private showing. Priced at 
$129,900 

Cod George Bessette at 847-395-9588 



* » 



VACANT 




Prestigious Subdivision 

Wonderful hall acre lot sitting high at* end of 
street. Beautiful views In subdivision just north 
of Lake Geneva'. Seller will consider land con- 
tract. Priced at $44,900. / 

Coll George Bessette at 847-395-9588 




Carefree living!!! 

In this immaculate townhouse. Just across from 
park and lake. Many upgrades. Oak flooring, 
trim and cablnots. 2 bedroom w/loft and don. 2 
car garage. Simply the best price around at 

$149,900. 

Cod Goorge Bessette at 847-395-9588 




Barn - 3.25 Acres 

* 

Business zoning. 30 x 70 bam on major high- 
way. Just seconds north of Antioch. Groat for 
many uses. Call for more Information. Prlcod 

at $125,000. 
Call Goorge Bessette at 847-395-9588 



Building 




Wooded BoIMsng Site 

Peaceful settingll Dead end ntteetl Oakwbod 
Knolls Subdivision*. Sewer Is at street. This one 
Is ready to go. Priced to $34,900, , * 

Coll George Bossotto at 847-395-9588 



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i4pr// 13 2001 



HOME 




South county facility 




d Newspapers / B 1 5 



For a child or adult with developmental 
or learning disabilities, making friends and 
becoming involved in community activities 
can be difficult. 

That's where The Center for Enriched Liv- 
ing comes in. The Center, located in River- 
woods, in south Lake County, is a life enrich- 
ment and skill development center for chil- 
dren and adults with developmental disabili- 





for disa 




ties, most of whom have a primary diagnosis 
of mental retardation. 

Since it was founded in 1968, The Center 
has moved around to various rented locations 
in Chicago, Skokie, Highland Park and Deer- 
field. Although membership was good in these 
locations, space constrictions limited program 
ming options. In June of 2000, The Center 
opened the doors of a brand new building, de- 



signed specifically for their members needs. 
Located just of 1-94 at 280 Saunders Rd. 
The Center's new 20,000 square foot home in- 
cludes: a lounge and recreation room where 
members can relax and socialized; a teaching 
kitchen for cooking, nutrition and budgeting 
skills; a practice apartment where they can 
I earn vital independent living skills; an arts and 
crafts room for creative learning; a large gym- 






rwyron 



0«c4oom 



Fred Br«nd«l 

(M7) 0O>2007 
#1 





Michael Catcont 

(•47) 601-2021 





Sindra Golladay 

(W7)*O-200* 

c21«nmOaoloom 




nasium with basketball hoops, an indoor track 
an d a performing arts ste 
technology center with tf 
equipment and applications; and mucn more. 
If you or someone you know could benefit 
from there services offered at The Center, or 
you are interested in volunteering or making a 
donation, please call 948-7001 for more infor- 
matio 




Marcla Banlka 

(•47)809-2000 





Doug Hug has 

(•47) 



Bob Link* 

|S47) 



i 



Cathy Welsch 

mm 





Jeff Lang 

600-2000 




Se Habla Espafiol 



Visit us at 

1326 Main St., Antioch, IL 

3blks. S. of 173 on 83 





Movvimy Po Polsku 




WILLIAMS 




jtt3j Each o«c« trt«p«rt«*y cmn*d A orated 




Sherry Barlow 

(S47)Vo-2007 
raWMfeOftol com 




HOW SWEET IT IS! 



Where else wd you find a ranch style 3 Bfl 

r>cu*e wrth a fua basement on crry water 

and sewer wuh an antra deep 2 car garage 
for thia fond of price? Heeds daaning and 
aomo pair*. FfiWA OKI J3« F 000 
CAU. JEFF LANQ AT e47-*O3-2009 




. ■ - -■- 

■■ ■ 



Chirt«n# Amouil 

(147)603-2009 

ch*Okwcom 









atea: 



BDRM. 

12 fuO & 2 1/2 bath ranch with h* base- 
ment, 2 car attachad garage and beautiful, 
afl wood 3-taaaon room. Neutral dacor. 
Immaculate. Ooaa to Matra and 1-94. 
5184.900. 

CALL JUDY AT S47-403-200S 



R E A L T Y 

STATE LINE 




® 



E-mail: klrw127@kw.com 



& 




BRICK RANCH, COUNTRY SETTING 



UnoaSavablal 3 BR 2 BA; hardwood floors, 

ha basement, aap DR. 3 car garage, al- 
most an acre! Home warranty avaiabl*. 
Cai now. 1205,000 

CALL JEFF LANQ AT 847-«OJ-2009 





UNION GROVE, WISCONSIN 

Start your business today. Ptaa & lounge to 
reedy for naw owners, great locaSon on Hwy. 

45 5239 900 

CALL SANDY GOLLADAY $47-403-2006 



COUNTRY SETT1NGI 

3 BR, ful bemt homa on 1/2 acre. Oatad & 
fenced. 4 cat garege. 

CALL LARRY LOEF S47-S02-2OM 




GURNEE 1.44 ACRE LOT 




Ba tha Rial to own 

fireplacea. 3 car oaraoa- Lookout basement, 
many, many extra's. Call for data**. MLS 
1160 
CALL SANDY GOLLADAY M7-403-200S 







ANTIOCH 

Chain O-Lake* lake right*. 1991 
br. homa on a 100x135 loL 2 1/2 car 
oaraoa. vaulted ceiings. finished tower 

leveT $159,900, MLS 101042034. 
CALL SANDY GOLLADAY 647*03-2008 



TREVOR 



NTOWANtTOCH 




ANTWCH 




433: I 



Connie Backer 

<*«na 

c**12M 



I 








Laura Beckman 

CS47)6O3-2016 






HOME SVYEET HOME 

to where youl be with thia 3 BR trl-levaL 

Eai-in krtchen, family room, Irg. ufcLty 

room, c/a. tots of storage and a parti afl y 
fenced yard are aome of tha laaturaa that 
ww make this homa your homa. 
$117,900. 
CALL CONNIE BECKER M7-403-2034 




ukHn MM H m <i,i MAM . MM iN. ,Sham2BRhomewtthnewrool.r»ewlJtchan|Wrutfevtow 

^i-j^^^^X^^r^ioSt- leabtne*. updated efctnc, attached garage, room, hoi tub room, 4 targe bedroom*. 
^S^^S!Z^SSwfGiiMiS& 70x130 W. city water & sewer, oreet beach I beeutrfulf replace, 4 car oarage, formal and 
and large garage. $72,500. MLS #01 02S548 | mru **vx«atoo & much more. $104,900. femJy rooms. Al w«h e vSwCaB today t 




or 537904. 

CALL SANDY COLLAOA 




-603-2001 



• *«■.? •< 





MLS. §01 
'CALL BANDY GOLLADAY M7-603-2OO6 



MLS. #00162657. 
CALL SANDY GOLLADAY S47-403-200* 







GET READY FOR SPRING 

In your new roma wtth take rignbj to the Chen 

The woocfay 2 Bfl atflng on a oomar lot la par- 
fact for year round fMng or weekend getaway. 

ConvenlenOy located wiMn minutes of golf 

cou rse* , st ate park. Chain Olake*. snow rnobtto 

trstt and mora S90.000 

CALL CONNIE BECKER *47-M3-»M 




CHARMING BRICK RANCH 

I Bdrma. 1 1/2 Ba.. full basement & 1 car 
anached garage wuh broezeway. New car- 
pet and newer roof & furnace. FP In Irving 
room, SeOer to relocating. ONLY $99,000. 
CALL BARBARA GOOONOUGH M7-6Q3-204I 



Nicola CereeoU 

(•47) 





LOOKING FOR A SECOND HOME? 

ToUJry remodeled ranch on 2 tot* just 1 
btock from sparVling Power* Lake in SE. 
Wtoc Oak krtchen end knotty pine LR with 
woodDurntog stove. Screen porch, roar 
deck, garden shod for those water toy*. 
Beach, boat launch and park nearby. A 
year round vacaDonl $108,000. 
CAU BARBARA GCOONOUGH M7-60>2Q4« 



FANTASTIC TOWNHOIIE IN MUN DEIBN 

3 tevato of fctng In this baaudfuty dacoratad 

townhoma )u« off Hwy. 45. Eecti BR is a suite 

w/a ful BA. Master has whMpOOl, second ft. 

leudnry. deck on DR & patio ofl tower level 

BR Stone FP m LR. maple UL Wal white ap- 

pkances inckt 2 car at. $218^00. 

CALL BARBARA GOOONOOOH M7-W5-2044 




BRAND NEW HOME 

1 144 eq. ft i' ranch homa with a ful unflntohad 

basement. 3 bedroom* with a vaulted hvin- 
groom and krtchen areas. Just a few snort 
blocks over the statefcne. (^mpietton in Jan' 
2001 so there is stifl time to ptok-out some 
color*. Lake rtoht* with boat launch and 

sandy beech. K>R ONLY $11 4.900. 

CALL DOUG HUGHES (647) 603-2022 





Co nmt ruction 



MEADOVWIEW SUBDIVISION 
PADDOCK LAKE, Wl 

New constnjctton. 3 bed.. 1 1/2 bath. At- 
tached garage. New subdrvisi on. Paved 
streets, concrete drive. Central 

$143,000. 
CALL JOANNE JOHNSON AT 647-603.2077 



SUPER SEED QUAfREVEL FOR $144,900 



4 bedroom, 25 bath home **h a 2.5 c*r 
garage. Plenty of room in this home with 
1 6x10 deck off back leading to private back- 
yard. Vault ed ceiling* in IrnngroonyVrtchen 

with finished ba s ement 4th bed. in basement 
with private bath. 

CALL OOUG HUGHES FOR KFO AT M740J-2C22 



To Everything 
There Is A Season!! 



2J0N-HARB0R RIDGE 



Great, spacious, newer ranch. 3 br.. 2 bth. 
fun finished basement wrth otfee or 4tn BR 
and FR. vaulted ceAngs, HW floors, ce- 
rarr»c bth. other upgrade*, fig lot, prof, 
landscaped. (Front & back). $159,900. 
CALL MARTA OLEJNIK 647-603-2064 




Looking to buy or sell your 
home this coming season. 

CALL JANICE & LAURA 

CHICAGO SIBLINGS OF SOLD 

» 847-603-2041 



RENTALS 




Sherrl Cascone 

(547) 609-2021 



** 



. 



If ' 





EXTRAORDINARY HOUSE!! 

You must see this Immaculale 2200+ s». 
custonvbuift, fuel effictonL maintenance 
Iree brick ranch on a 2-ecre rural [parcel 

Z& bathe. Youl want to 



with3 

leal II 

CAILUARY 



I bedrooms. 2.5 1 
home, and it's or 
UAaviu_Ex roa a 



only $239,900. 

I A SHOWtNO S47-SOMO0S 



WHYRENT? _ 

When you can own this weO-kept mobile 
home. 2 bedroom, computer area. Large 
(amtfy room, nice kitchen w.t>ay window 
and afl appliance* stay! AJ (or asking price 

CAil CASCONE A DUVAL M7-*0J-2QJ1 







RUSTIC CHARM ABOUNDS-. 



in this 3 bedroom, 2 bath Gastineau tog home 
set on 2+ acres that includes frontage on the 
Fox River with accea* to the 'Chain oflakee - - 

Recently reduced by seller* to $256,900. 

CAU IIAlff ELLLN TO SiE Tm OMTODATJOaaMBM 




Antioch $695 mo. 



Largo 2 bedroom house w/Tireplace. Lake 
rights to Lake Elizabeth. $875 mo. 



Office/Retal - storefront 600 sq. ft 

$395 mo. 

CALL CASCONE A DUVAL 

847-603-2021 




HOME SWEET HOME 

if youVe been looking for a home In the coun- 
try. Ihis t% rtl Five t^drooms, 3 baths, country 
ea!-ln kitchen, walk-out tower level has family 
room, bedroom and fufl bath. 2.5 car garage, 
pus larci pole bam. AS on £5 acre*. Asking 

CAU UAXt V1D4 FOa MOM WfO M7-*JV»M 





Y WALK 



$147,500. Sharp 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath 
home with vaulted ceding*, garden tub In 
Ma great krtchen wAsland and 2 car 
garage. For Information. Chicago* siblings 

CAU JA>*C* AND LAURA M740VJO4! 




Too New 



For Photo 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 



In Ice and Coal subdrvoton. Water nghts 
to Lake Marie. 3 bedrooms, 4 car garage. 
Many posattMaHeejaj 

CALLOnplFAWO FOR KFO M7-4C3-20M 



• • 



Real Estate 

Classes 

Starting in 

30 Days 

Call (847) 603-2000 
To Register 




WADSWORTH RANCH ON 

5 ACRES 

Fabulous acreage backing up to forest 
preserve - horse* aflowed 3 bedroom. 1 . 1 
bath ranch. 2.5 car garage, ful besemenL 
convenient location with toto of privacy. 

$325,000 eMMBlBalWKttaefaV 

ron a#o cau uahy huh Mfanaooi 




NEW LISTING IN SALEM 



ILEM 

reshrypa.nl- 



Three bedroom*. 2 1/2 bath*, f 
ed throughout, and ready for new ownerl 
This newer raised ranch feature* a master 
bedroom with a full bath, a large famtfy 
room, an ea!-4n kitchen wrth seder* to deck 
overiooking large back yard and wood*. 
Asking $132,900. 

CAU MAKY IUW R» UOAf WFO MJeSJ-JOftl 




Tammy SplL'ar 

(S47) eOO-2009 

ilMfflOiwmm 




Curt Miller 

(S47)83a^e*3 

lOhwcxxn 




Marte Olelnlk 
]a47ieoo-aJa4 




Gary Duval, GRI 

(M7) 003-2030 
dsJfSetai ^ s moi COTi 




Scot! Oo4laday 

(*47) eo*-»oe 




Gerry Quanthar 

(647) 6O3-207S 




Ron Jackson 

(S47) 603-2063 
rt^lrwOkwcom 




Glory Bllalll 

S (647)603-2070 
gtorybAuOeoicom 



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Joseph Cencula 

(S471 603-2063 

otnouUOkwxom 







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WANTED 

Client Coordinator 
People parson 

w/compuier skills. 

Multi-line phone 

ianswerina. 

Stop in & fill out 

an application. 
















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B 1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME MARKETER 



April 13, 2001 



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D ecks allow homeowners to turn style inside out 



The American home Is the quintessential 
expression of individual style - a place that re- 
flects personality and so much more. But as 
the trend toward outdoor entertaining and 
dining grows, so has the opportunity for 
homeowners to apply their sense of style to 
backyard decks. 

"Why would you want your personality to 
end at the backdoor? Decks have moved be- 
yond a brown, square extension on the home. 
There are so many elements you can bring to 
your deck that will make it as much of a re- 
flection of your family as the interior of your 
home," says Pat Coughlin, of The Flood Com- 
pany, makers of deck stains, finishes and 



cleaners for over 150 years, 

Coughlin offers the following suggestions 
to bring your personality outdoors this sea- 
son: 

Incorporate hobbies and interests. There 

are several features you can build into a deck 

that will enable you to bring the activities and 

interests of your family to your outdoor living 

space. For example, if you enjoy reading a 

book by the window during the colder 
months, creating a reading nook outdoors is 

even better in the spring and summer. A 
bench underneath an arbor provides the per- 
fect secluded spot for your reading enjoy- 
ment. 



W&&&*&^!%9!f!®®i&&8 




Grand 

727 Grand Ave., Ingleside/Fox Lake 

She can be reached at ext. 113 

Fox Lake: (847) 587-8200 

Antloch: (847) 395-8222 

Lake Villa/Llndenhurst: (847) 356-8228 

Round Lake: (847) 740-8201 



Call Sharon Today Direct Line 847-587-7274 xl 13 









HAS ALL THE "I WANTS" 

Stunning 2 Story •• 2 Bedrooms •• 2.5 Baths 
** Family rm w/fircplace enhanced w/mirror 

cw shelving & surround sound ick Deck ick C/A 
gS'** Urge Kitchen $184,900 










MOST WANTED LIST: 

3 Bedrooms ** 2 Baths ** Family Room ** 
Fireplace ** Deck ** Oversized 3 Car Garage 
•• OA •* All on -4 Acres. Ustcd below . 

appraised value! $269,895 





LARGE TRI-LEVEL 

Vaulted Ceilings ** Newer Carpet In Master Bdrm 
& Living Room ** A Bedrooms - 2 Baths •* 
New Stainless Steel Dishwasher ** Family Room 
••Deck $162,900 






HANDY MAN "SPECIAL" 

Home is situated on nice wooded lot in Fox Lake. City ' **' 
sewer and water *• 2 bedrooms •* I bath ** 

Close to schoots ** Shopping •* Train ** Etc 
$59,900 




% G^*®0W@^*&@®!®&W 




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The American home is the quintessential expression of individual style - a place 
that reflects personality and so much more. But as the trend toward outdoor en- 
tertaining and dining grows, so has the opportunity for homeowners to apply their 
sense of style to backyard decks. 



If you have children with lots of toys, 
move the playroom outdoors during the 
warmer months by creating a bench with a 
built-in storage space. When guests unex- 
pectedly come over, all the children's toys can 
be quickly tucked away. 

Define your style with color. Nothing can 
give your deck personality better than color. A 
deep red deck communicates a different per- 
sonality than one that is n utral beige. Select 
a color (or more than one) that illustrates 
your family best. With all the colors available 
in semi-transparent and solid color stains to- 
day, there is no boundary to your selection. If 
you decide to pick more than one color to ac- 
cent, make sure that the colors complement 
each other and the house. 

Flood makes both solid color and semi- 
transparent stains that are available In a vari- 
ety of colors and are guaranteed to last. Flood 
Solid Color Deck and Siding Stain Is guaran- 
teed against peeling for five years on decks 
and 15 years on siding. Flood Semi -Transpar- 
ent Deck and Siding Stain is guaranteed 
against peeling and fading for three years on 
decks and five years on siding. 



Add the right touch of personality with 
details. There are several ways to subtly incor- 
porate your personality into your outdoor liv- 
ing space. Place your favorite flowers in pots 
around the deck. Or, if you don't have a green 
thumb, stencil them on railings, stair risers or 
floorboards. Sunflowers, daisies and ivy can 
all adorn your deck by stenciling with a solid 
color stain. 

Furniture and accessories can also add 
the details you need to complete your deck. 
The varieties in outdoor furniture styles and 
materials give you several options when se- 
lecting furniture for your deck. While a dining 
table and chairs may be suitable for your 
neighbor, perhaps a bar set-up and lounge 
chairs is better for your family. Shop around 
to find the right furniture and accessories for 
your deck. 

For more information, or to receive a free 
wood care guide, call The Flood Company, 1- 
800-321-3444, or visit their Web site at 
www.floodco.com. 
Courtesy of AM Content, 
www.aracontent.com, e-mail: info@aracon- 
tent.com 



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4005 Kane Avenue (Rt. 31 South) 

McHenry, IL 60050 



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Office: (81 5) 385-6770 
Direct: (815) 363-2453 

24 hr. Toll Free 

(888) 662-8653 

Web: waynemoran@realtor.com 



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2- stty en U ntflure bnikapd xris JtWtm 
Stone finite Outfofye^to^ 

Mn.bur, $294,900 Call Wayne 



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NAUTICAL NEIGHBORHOOD! 

4Mra)nU5B^3CafGan&ful!tini^wta 
afc^fbmuldMigim Masted 

jobn«bur 9 $3\2,900 Call Wayne 



WOODS & WATER 

it without the price tag. This charming home has Just been updated. 
i 3 badts. Wood floor & qu any tile, 2 fireplaces and basement. Pis- 
takee Bay views. Approx. 2800 sq. ft. 

j324,900fo// Wayne 
INDUSTRIAL CONDOS 

•Upscale business park 
• Precast construction 

•14' clear height . 
•12' overhead door 

•Rough plumbed 
•200 amp single phase 

•Fully landscaped 
•August 2001 occupancy 

Preeomtruelion tile starting at 

$69,900Call Wayne 



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AFFORDABLE 

4-5 Bedrooms, 1.5 Baths, newer roof, furnace & air. Spacious kitchen w/new 
floor. Heated garage. Close to shopping & boat launch to Chain 0* Lakes. 

j.h..h.„ $B4,900&// Wayne 



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A BIG YARD WITH TREESI 

4 bedrooms, 1.5 balh. Just remodeled jind ready for you! Almost 1/2 acre lot 

w/lots of trees. 2 car garage close to stale park. 

**Hn* $\49 .900 Call Wayne 



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April 13, 2001 




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HOME MARKETER 



Lakeland Newspapers / B 1 7 




How 'whole home' insulation cuts bills, aids comfort 






Energy bills through the roof? You're 
not alone. But you are in luck. 

William Ryan Homes has introduced a 
new home energy program called Certified 
PLUS Home, which promises to reduce en- 
ergy use and bills by up to 30 percent com- 
pared to standard built homes, while at the 
same time creating more comfortable home 
living environments. 

The company is the first and currently 
the only builder in the Chicagoland area to 
offer this kind of program and savings to 
new home buyers in Lake County at Cross 
Creek, Lindenhurst, and Ancient Oaks in 
Valley Lakes, Round Lake. 

"We jumped at the opportunity to get . 
involved with this program," said Peter Bal- 
istreri, vice president of sales and marketing 
for William Ryan Homes. "It was an easy de- 
cision considering our homes already met 
most of the requirements for certification. 
With just a few minor changes we now can 
offer buyers tremendous energy savings and 
the Increased value of owning a Certified 
PLUS home." 

Developed by Certain Teed Corpora- 
tion, a leading insulation manufacturer, in 
conjunction with E.I.C., Inc., an indepen- 
dent energy engineering firm, the Certified 
PLUS Home program helps builders maxi- 
mize the efficiency of energy systems in 
newly constructed homes. Using a whole 
house approach, the program ensures prop- 



er air flow throughout the home while elim- 
inating the'infiltration of outside air that 
can creep in around door/window frames 
and electrical outlets causing unwanted 
drafts and stuffiness. In essence, a thermal 
barrier to created around all living areas re- 
sulting in consistent room temperatures, 
uniform comfort and optimum energy effi- 
ciency. 

William Ryan Homes has committed to 
making every one of its new homes a Certi- 
fied PLUS home. To earn certification, the 
builder starts by creating an individualized 
energy system for each new home. Precise- 
ly-sized heating and cooling equipment is 
selected and insulation It-values are chosen 
. based on the specific region and climate of 
the home. 

"No two homes are alike when it comes 
to energy use," explained Balistreri. "Site lo- 
cation and the orientation of the home on 
the site greatly affect how it performs ther- 
mally. Even homes with the exact same 
floor plan can vary greatly in their energy 
specifications. That is why it Is so important 
to approach each home individually." 

During construction, third-party repre- 
sentatives of EI.C. conduct a complete 
room-by-room heat gain/loss analysis and 
provide CFM and BTU requirements for * 
each living area. William Ryan Homes then 
" follows the exacting energy specifications 
for the home before it is caulked, sealed and 













— 






MEDIA 



ir 



Check out our 
web site at: 

lakelandmedia.com 






- X 




:_. f 



v - v 



Buying or Selling? 
Want maitimum ejiposutElor your home? 

Visit www.aquahomes.com. 

—Your hormrcould'be featured here! 



local events 



i t 



j ■ 



»— 4 ■ 



subscription info 

• sports 




classified ads 



and more! 



■ 

■ 




Holly 

RE^ffXG 
(847)58 





■J i 



137 



.-■• 




tit 



$98,000 



KELLER WILLIAMS 

. R I A I T * 

8 T A X B.X, INK 

Each 0*c« *ndro*nd*<y 0-n*J 1 Op«««j 




1326 Main St 
Antioch 




insulated. After construction, EI.C. repre- 
sentatives return to conduct a rigorous five- 
step performance evaluation to assure that 
any potential air penetration sites have 
been tightly sealed, insulation has been 
properly installed and heating and air con- 
ditioning systems are operating at top effi- 
ciency. 

If the home fails any of the tests, EI.C. 
alerts the builder allowing them to make ad- 
justments before construction is finished. 
E.I.C. then runs the complete five-step 
process again. Only when a home passes all 
of the performance tests will it be deemed a 
Certified PLUS home. Once the home is cer- 
tified, the buyer receives a Certified PLUS 
Home Warranty, complete with an estimate 



of their home's heating and cooling costs. 
Using the EI.C. analyses of each home, erf- 
ergy projections are determined and a com- 
puter-generated report is prepared telling 
buyers what to expect in terms of fuel usage 
and costs for the first three years. If more 
energy is used than projected during that 
time, it's free. 

"Buyers appreciate knowing in advance 
what it's going to cost to heat and cool their 
homes, especially considering how unpre- 
dictable gas prices have been lately," said 
Balistreri. "They also appreciate the added 
resale value certification gives their homes." 

Certified PLUS Home buyers can also 
qualify for special energy-efficient mort- 
gages with special terms. 



sunsH/ne rehl ty, m* 

\5231 Washington SL, Gurnee 

(On Washington St. across from Great nmerlca) 

(847 J 360-9200 



WO 



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ED HOME SITE! 



Heavily-wooded 1 .68 acres 
in upscale division just 
minutes away from the 

| Chain O' Lakes,Tri-State 

Tollway, forest preserve, 

Gurnee Mills and the 

Wisconsin border. Enjoy an 

unsurpassed quality of life i 

your dream home in a 
. private rural setting with 
easy commuting to Chicago 

and Milwaukee. 
$95,000. 






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COMMERCIAL 

BUILDING! 

Over 1 7,000 square feet. 

On nearly an acre on major 

' highway in Lake County. 

High visibility. Additional 

information by appointment 

only. Non-disclosure 

agreement required. 

$698,000. 



NEW CONSTRUCTION! 

4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home under 
construction with ceramic tile 
entry, kitchen, laundry & baths. 
Volume ceiling in entry, living room 
& dining room. Eat-in kitchen with 
sliders to deck. Family room has 
brick-faced fireplace. Master bed- 
room has cathedral/ ceiling and bath. 
3-car garage. Ready 6/6/0 1. 

$194,900. 



i • . 



OPPORTUNITY! 

Profitable hair salon with a history 

of growth has potential for much 

more. You do not need to be a 

beautician to operate this business 

(over 70% of owners are not),. 

urn-key operation. 
$45,000. 



for details. 



Call Fred at (847) 374-7969 I Information by appointment only. 

Call Fred at (847) 374-7969. 

MEMBER MLSNI AND 







$139,900 




WISCONSIN METRO SE MLS 







HOW SWEET IT IS! 

Where etso will you find a ranch style 3 BR house with 
basement on city water and sewer with an extra deep 
oarage (or this kind of price? Needs cleaning and some 



FOOLED YOU! 

Thought it was brand new! Island kitchen, sliders to patio, 
fenced yard. 3BR, 2 1/2 BA w/2 1/2 car garage. Did I men- 
tion the fireplace? 



CALL JEFF LANG 
(847) 603-2009 










I 







- 














Jeff Lang 
(847) 603-2009 



% 



Illinois 
and 



Wisconsin 



$549,900 




II 



_ THE 

cres. sprawling 4BR, 3 1/2 BA custom home, In-law 
tial, 8 stall horse bam, greenhouse, mature woods 
fenced 




$205,000 





HARDWOOD FLOORS & PLASTER 

WALLS ^ ." no 

. Unbelievable! 38R. 2BA; country settino fuU basement, sep, DR. 
I 3 car Garage, almost an acre! Home Warranty Available. Call 



■■■I 



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If your neighbors are 



$347,900 




PEACEFUL SERENITY! 

Poroo, marble, pavers, three fireplaces, kitchen w/a view, 
dock w/hot tub. almost an acre. 4BR. 2 1/2 BA. DR, FR. 
Roc Rm. Den (poss 1st fir BR), full bmt. 2 1/2 car gar/sep 
2car garAvkshop. Call for list of recent updatesl 



LISTINGS UNDER 

$100,000 

There are many of these which sell so fast 
they don't get advertised! CALL TODAY to get 
on the list for these homes. FIRST TIME BUY- 
ERS can also get special help and money! Call 
now for details & to see how to 'apply for these 
assistance programs in IL & Wl. 








Jeff, maybe they don't want you 



9 - 








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B 1 8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME MARKETER 



April 13, 2001 



Think spring . . . Fresh ideas for your walls 



Spring is a time to start fresh and try new 
things. So, there is no better time than now to 
experiment and be adventurous in your own 
home. 

You can start by adding a little life to your 
home with these simple suggestions from 
Art.com. These techniques will add texture and 
depth to your walls and accentuate your art- 
work. 
Emphasize your artwork with paint: 

•Using either stencils or freehand draw- 
ings, create an additional frame for your art- 
work by painting a few simple accents on the 
walls surrounding your framed art Choose an 
accent mat will complimentlhe subject matter 



of your artwork. For example, you could accent 
a framed landscape or still life print with paint- 
ed ivy or ribbons. For a more modern piece, 
you may try using geometric shapes or over- 
lapping thin lines to border the entire piece of 
"artwork. Experiment on paper to find the right 
accent for your artwork. 

• Create a three-dimensional look that will 
draw more attention to your artwork with col- 
or-blocking techniques. This can be achieved 
by painting a rectangle on the wall where you 
plan to hang your art. To do this, measure the 
artwork and mark the space on the wall where 
you plan to hang it. Next, carefully paint a rec- 
tangle considerably larger than the size of your 



artwork. Using a third color, paint a thin bor- 
der around the edge of the rectangle you just 
painted to create a more finished look. After 
the paint has dried, hang your framed print. 
Your new wall should look more dramatic and 
provide a greater emphasis on your artwork. 
Accent with shelves and ledges: 

• Draw attention to your framed artwork 
by installing small shelves or narrow ledges 
on your walls to showcase your art. This 
works well if you do not have a fireplace 
with a mantel. Temporary shelving comes in 
all sorts of shapes and sizes and can be in- 
stalled symmetrically for a more traditional 
•setting or staggered for a more contempo- 



rary look. 

Depending on the weight of your artwork 
and die sturdincss of the shelves, you can ei- 
ther place the artwork directly on the shelves 
or hang the artwork above it. Place accent ob- 
jects, such as candles, vases, books, etc, on the 
shelves below the artwork to further compli- 
ment your art 

If you are looking for an even easier way to 
brighten up your home this season, bring the 
outdoors inside with some new bright floral , 
prints or elegant black-and-white nature pho- 
tography. These breath taking images from 
Art.com will reinvigbrate your soul and your 
home. 




An Independent Member Broker 
All Financing Subject to Change 



{Mm 





Center 



Center and Atkinson, Grayslake, IL 



(847) 




7878 




Richard H. Capocclonl 

CRB.CRS 



J 




STATELY BRICK HOME 

Country French estate on equestrian 4,6 acre lot in Hunt Club Forms. Dramatic 2-sto- 
ry foyer u /circular staircase. 1st floor study. Bayed family room w/fireplace. Large 

kitchen w/hardsvood & graniic. Royal master suite w/sitling area, whirlpool, tray ceil- 
ing. Option for horse bam> $959,000. 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (817) 223-7878 







GURNEE CUSTOM HOME 

Brand new handsome brick & cedar 4 bdrm. home in Woodside Park. Huge oak kitchen 
w/corian tops. Double-door entry to master suite with whirlpool bath. 9* ceilings 1st 
floor. Will be completed soon! 1st floor study. $449,900. 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 




MERIT CLUB ESTATE 

Beautiful new estate home on 1 + acre. Walkout lower level, patio and spadous deck 
with panoramic view of golf course. 2-story bayed living room. Custom hardwood 
paneled library. I st floor master suite fit for r^sJty. Inlild hardwood floori, trayed 
ceilings, granite & marble. Huge gourmet kitchen has bayed eating area. Spectac- 
ular! $1,160,000, 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 






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LAKEFRONT HOME 

Huge home designed to talc advantage of the fabulous lake views. Equestrian lot in 
Wad worth's Hum Oub Farms. Home has 2-story living room & study. Large foyer 
with circular siaircasc. Bayed rooms offer beauty & wide-angle views. Walk-out base- 
ment Marble, gmnite, hardwoods, molding* $1360,000. 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 




BRICK 4 BR. COLONIAL 

Gorgeoui home on 1.9 acre wooded site in beautiful Jonathan Knolls in Wadswonh. 
Loaded with Cathedral ceilings, crown & chair molding, marble and hardwood. Bal- 
cony over front door. Outstanding floor plan. Proposed construction. Call for details! 
$479,000. v 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI ♦ (847) 223-7878 




3 BEDROOM TOWNHOME 

■ 

tifully decorated end unit loaded with quality upgrades! Two decks to af 
nature in this wooded area. Master suite has cathedral ceiling & whirfpoc 
d Lake's Treehouse in the Woods. Only 2 yean old! Family room with 
. 2 car garage. Oak kitchen. Sharp! $ ! 69,900 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 



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LIBERTYVILLE TRI-LEVEL 

*' i' ■ * ' m 

3 bedroom trMcvel with newer carpeting & freshly painted Nice size yard, 2 car 
garage. Family room & utility room In lower level. Close to park &. schools. Ub- 
ertyville schools! Great neighborhood. $259,000 



■ * 



RICHARD CAPOCCIONI- (847) 223-7878 



* ^« 



► . . 



■ -• «. — 




MILL CREEK WOODLANDS 

Outstanding Wadworth homes with finished walk-out lower level! Soaring win- 
dows to appreciate nature on this wooded lot. 4500 sq fl of luxury and style. 4 
fireplaces, 3-car garage, 2-sty kitchen, 1st fl master suite, granite, marble, sky. 
lights, hot tub, deck, solarium. Too much to list! $519,9000. 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI ♦ (847) 223-7878 




VICTORIAN FARMHOUSE 



Older Gumee home in good condition with 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. 1 car garage. On 
over an acre in area targeted by village for multi-family zoning, allowing 6-9 unitsAscre, 
All services to property. Adjoining 1.7 acres also available. $269,900. 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 




L 



BRICK COUNTRY FRENCH 

Stunning home on cul-de-sac in Wad worth's beauu'ful Jonathan Knolls. 2-story foyer 
wftray ceiling. 2-sty family room w/fireplacc. Study w/bay window. 2 staircases. Base- 
ment access from parage. Master has tray ceiling, huge walk-in, whirlpool & separate 
shower. Loaded with quality features. $549300. 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 



LAND 



Hunt Club Farms, Wadsworth-Estate Homesltes 

3.6 Acre Cul-de-sac Lot wAVestem Exposure. $1 89,900 
Prime 2.88 Acre Wooded Site. $285,000 . 

Emerald Ridge, Linden hurst-Custom Homeslte 

Lot w/westem exposure, rear wooded. $89,500 

Commercial 

3.64 Acres of prime Oumec property on major heavy traffic 
■ highway. Addiu'onal acreage targeted multi-family also available. 
$792,792 

t 

,u Developer wanted 

. Up to 7.7 acres of prime uumee property targeted for 6-9 units/acre 
zoning. All services to site, Min. I acre site. 



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EUROPEAN STYLE 

Beautiful country estate home w/fabulous master suite. Trayed ceiling, his/her walk' 
ins, whirlpool, vaulted sitting rm w/fireptacc, Cherry kitchen w/corian tops &. hard* 
wood floor, 2-story family room. I st floor study w/ hardwood floor. In Wadsworth't 
Jonaihon Knolls. £$90,000, 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 




RESTAURANT BUILDING 



Handsome buiktim 
ingorcA 

uses possibl 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 



« buildina with good location in growing Grayslake area. Large open din* 
Seats 145 g»pk Great parking lot! All equipment it negotiable. Other 

liblc* 5499.999. 




HILLSIDE RANCH . 

:anch nestled among oak trees & backs to foreit preserve. Wrap-around deck, 2 » 
rhite eurostyle kitchen w/built-in brick grill. Finiihed walk-out level w/rec room, 
lace, office, full bath, kitchen & solariin w/hot tub. Skylight, parquet floor, 1 
arage, 2 fireplaces. Fabulous location! $349,000. 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 




GURNEE RANCH 

Meticulous 3 bedroom home on over an ncrel 2-car garage. Targeted for zoning for 
6-9 units/acre multi-family. A gTeat home + great Investment potential 1 $199,900 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878* 






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April 13, 2001 



D espite 




HOME MARKETER 



* 

Lakeland Newspapers / B 1 9 




Despite record-high prices for heating gas 
this winter, many apartment renters will be 
surprised to find their worst fears of large rent 
increases never come to pass, said Judy Roet- 
tig, executive vice president of the Chicagoland 
Apartment Assn. 

The non-profit group represents 300 
members who are owners and managers of 
more than 105,000 apartment units and asso- 
ciated industry vendors throughout the greater 

six-county Chicagoland area, including Lake 
County. 

In many cases, owners of large to mid- 
sized apartment buildings have been able to 
skirt soaring natural gas costs this winter by 



landlords skirt mayor rent increases 



taking advantage of programs ofTered by gas 
suppliers, such as bulk and contract purchas- 
es, Roettig said. 

High-tech, super-efficient heating equip- 
ment is also helping keep expenses down, en- 
ergy expert say. 

In any case, said Roettig, landlords from 
the smallest 2-flats to the largest apartment 

. cannot recover all 
of their increased heating gas costs from ten- 
ants. _^« 

"Rent increases may .._ - a5lS - <r - : ^.—— .. 
prior years when they were typically 5 percent 
to 8 percent," Roettig said. "Rents are market- 
driven." 



Roettig explained that as business people, 
most property owners realize rent hikes of 10 
percent or more to recoup heating costs could 
backfire, leaving them with empty apartments 
and increased turn-around expenses. 

There are different ways to make up for 
die higher costs besides major rent increases," 
said Diana Jullan-Pittro, general manager of 
The Habitat Company's four-building, 2, 346- 
apartment Presidential Towers complex. 

"Property owners will do more bulk natur- 
al gas purchasing, make more use of advance 
gas contracts, men perhaps plant fewer flowers 
outside and adjust overall spending In other 
ways," she said. 



"It doesn't serve any purpose to sharply 
raise rents. If you did, everyone would just 
move out," Julian-Pittro said. 

Apartment experts say it is better to take 
advantage of sophisticated techniques for 
holding down increases that were inevitable, 
as many landlords have done. 

Although government and consumer pro 
tection agencies are still looking into the rea- 
sons for the increase, experts say a few facts 
have emerged. 

Several successive mild winters worked tc 
hold down natural gas prices in the area. Heal 
ing gas hovered at around 
therm as late as March ol 



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REALTY GROUP 



KELLER WILLIAMS 

realty! 
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Eacn Offiot independently OwrxxJ And Operated 



Our Sales Speak 

Louder Than Words 









Licensed IL/WI 

847-603-2021 






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847-603-2036 



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847-603-2007 



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GARY DUVAL 



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FRED BRENDEL 



SHERRYBARLOW 



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Long time owner selling business property 
id good will, also included as a package 
•eautifully redone lakefront home on Petite 
Lake, right across from tavern. Package 
price with lakefront home. 



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$575,000 
$289,000 

Call MIKE OR GARY 

847-603-2021 



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BEAUTIFUL DOV 

4 bedroom, huge country lot, walking distance to library & shopping. 
Also zoned R-5 up to 5 units could be buile $129,900 

CALL MIKE CASCONE 847-603-2021 



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LOOKING FOR A FARMETTE 

r , . _. sleeves, plant some seeds, buy some . , _ T 

wonderful 12 acre farmette with 3 outbuildings. Pear, apple and cherry 
trees. $335,000 

CALL MIKE OR GARY 847-603-202 1/2036 



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, ' - GORGEOUS COLONIAL - 

I A true Southern Colonial set on 152 acres of farmland. Property has It 
all - Inground pool, tennis courts, stables, 5 bedrooms and several out- 
buildings! Ybur dreams come true. $2,950,000 

CALL MIKE OR GARY 847-603-2021 



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NEW CONSTRUCTION 

Irooms, 2 baths, quality throughout, family room Ir 
ted in bath. Lake rights. Minutes over the border c 
and highway. $147,900 

CALL MIKE FOR YOUR PRIVATE SHOWING. 847^03-2021 



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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ___ 

Popular florist In Ubertyvllle selling business, equipment and good will. 
Turn key operation. Just take over. Price to sell!! $48,500 

CALL MIKE OR GARY 847-603-2021 



NEW LISTING - BREEZY LAWN ESTATES 

Expanded Barrington model ranch by KLM. Set on I JS+ wooded acre. 

Great room w/vaulted ceiling and custom stone fireplace. Large master 

bed. w/prtvate deck. 3 -bed.. 2 1/2 bth, den, dining rm. Full walkout base 

tached 3+ car gar. Numerous upgrades. This Is an area of estate homes 

much desired Spring Grove. $379,7 1 1 

CALL FRED & SHERRY TODAY 847403-2007 






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ON THE RIVER 

Perfect weekend retreat or starter, 2 bedroom. A 
Fox River frontage. Hum. ONLY $69,900. 

CALL MIKE OR C " tM 



BREEZY LAWN 

Beautiful contemporary home on I wooded acre. 2 story solarium, A bed, 
2 1/2 bath + partial bath in lower level. Walkout base. 2 story great room, 
large kitchen w/many cabinets. Master bed. suite w/private sitting area. 
Passive solar home w/very low utilities. A must see! Over 2500 sq. ft 

$259,7 1 1 ^^ FRED a SHERRY TODAY 847^03-2007 



NEW LISTING 

WILMOT FARMS 

Just move right in. Clean & bright custom 
2 story colonial. 2300+ sq. ft, of living space 
with bright english base. 4 large bed. 2 I fl 
baths. Huge great room effect w/targe kitchen 
and family room with fireplace attached. 3 car + 
fin. garage. All on I beautiful acre. Adjacent to 
Chain O'Lakes State Park. Boating, fishing. 
hiking. $272,711. WtMtKtm 

CALL FRED & SHERRY TODAY 
- 847-403-2007 



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NEW LISTING - SPRING GROVE 

Over 4000 sq. ft of finished living area, on I wooded acre. 3-4 bed, 4 
bath. Master bed w/hers and his private master baths. Sunken family 
room w/wood burning fireplace, full fin. walk out lower level w/gas fp. 
Screened porch w/deck and much, much more. $339, 71 1 

CALL FRED & SHERRY TODAY 847^03-2007 









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NEW LISTING - SPRING GROVE 

Beautiful colonial on I acre site. Very dean w/neutral decor. 4 large bed- 
room, 2 1/2 baths. Lg. master bed. suite, lam. rm. w/fp. Finished lower 
level Attached 2 1/2 car gar. and detached oversized 3 car gar. Gazebo, 
deck storage shed and much, much more. $299,711 

CALL FRED & SHERRY TODAY 847403-2007 






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BREEZY LAWN ESTATES - SPRING GROVE 

230XH- sq. ft family room w/vaulted celling, skylights and wood burning 
fireplace. 4 bed.. 2 1/2 bath, kitchen, eating area w/oak floors and cabi- 
nets w/slidlng door leading to deck. 3-*- car garage, full english basement 
w/9' ceiling, neutral decor. Shows like a model Call today, this Is a great 

home at a great price. $273,711 

CALL FRED ft SHERRY TODAY 847403-2007 



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AIN O'LAKES WATERFRONT 

Over 1/3 acre site. 3 bed. brge fam. rm. attached gar. Deck huge boat 
dock. Clean and ready for a new family. Locate the heart of the Chain 






lakes. Great location. Comes completely 



able. $214. 



CALL 



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NOW 



Big Apple 



BAGELS 




Rise and Shine 



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i'^ifevlg with Big Apple Bagels 
'tmSWk in Antioch! 



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(near Piggly Wiggly) 

838-5722 

Fax us your order at 838-5733. 




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# PuhlicllnviteMm 

Join Our 
Yankee Candle Club 

Stop By 
For Details 




Community Bible Church 






GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE 7:00 PM 

EASTER SERVICES 
6:00, 9:00 & 11:00 AM 



For more 

information 

call 



(847) 838-0103 




23201 W. Grass Lake Road 

(cast of Rt. 83) 

Antioch, IL 




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V for a iwootor Easterl 

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DAIRY QUEEN OF ANTIOCH E 

966 Main Street fc 

847-395-8383 * 




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Liyofy yaw Taster 

at tfie> IS eeuitiful *&€arhaur Cluh 
2/1/ tfi& §fiare&' af HSluff £ake> 




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Our Brunch Menu includes a 
complimentary glass of champagne 

Carved Roast Beef 
Baked Ham 





Roast Turkey & Trimming 
Sausage & peppers 
Fresh Vegetables 



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Eggs Benedict • 
Scrambled Eggs 
Sausage, Bacon 
Crepes, Blintzes 
Breakfast Breads & Rolls 
Fresh Fruits 




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Easter Menu 

Lamb cassoulet 

Five Spice infused honey ham 

Roast breast of turkey with roasted 

red pepper sauce 
Stuffed halibut topped with a 

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champagne butter sauce 
Dessert - Passion Fruit Sorbet 

with a black currant and 
apricot coulis 
Easter pkg available to include: 
Main course (choice of 1) 
Dessert 

Champagne and bloody mary bar 
$17.95 or Ala cart $11.95 



25276 W. Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, IL 

Serving From 1 AM - 4 PM 

Adults $17.95 - 12 & under $9.95 Under 4 Free 

For Reservations, Call 847-395-9330 



&%uauiu WTertxc* in a QfttfttHa/e &t//i'na 

Closed Tuesday 
Phone for Reservations 



26375 West Route 173, AnUoch, IL 847-395-1707 




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Tisket A Tasket 

Order Your Floral Acres 

EASTER BASKET 

- 

A beautiful centerpiece of daisies, 

carnations, statlce, tulips, trimmed 

for Easter In a wicker basket. 



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CASH & CARRY 
COMPARE TO $35.00 
Local Delivery Available 



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WE'RE OPEN EASTER SUNDAY 8:00 AM! 



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your Gardening 
j/Ingols " 

(1 mile S. of Rt 173, on Rt 83) 

395-1211 • 395-1212 





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COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers I B21 









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Where Driving A Little Will Save You A Lot! 



395-5800 



Hours: Mon & Fri 9am-8pm 

• T, W, Th 9am-6pm • Saturday 9am-5:30pm 
•Sunday 11 am-4pm 



ANTIOCH 

ON Iff. 83, 1 HUE SOUTH OF RT. 173 



R1173 


NorthA 

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Rt 132 


Grand Ave. 



1 Mile South of Rt 173 



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IN-HOME SET-UP 



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Dolls - TeddvBears - ems - Collectimes 

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909 Main St. ^^r^> 

Antioch, IL 60002 signup for riddy 

(888) 251-0384 



Bear Classes! 
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Sun 11 - 4 • Mon 10 - 3 • Tues - Thur 10-5 
•Fri12-7 -SatlO-S 



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847-395-8282 




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EASTER SUNDAY MENU 

Baked Ham (off the bone) 

leg of Lamb A 

Steaks 

Prime Rib 

Cold Water Lobster 




i 



40805 N. Routt 83 GERMAN-AMERICAN CUOME 

Anttocti. Illinois 80002 

jt m» *>um * AM*e*l dosed Tuesday* 



Katie's 

Country Cottage 

Ml hi 1 fine Handera/Is V Coanbj Gi/fs 
CoDfllrf k Primifir e Farailnre \ 



Main 
Antioch, IL 60002 



Mod. • Thuri. 
ilO-7 Sat 

Sun. Noon 



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MENTONE'S 

10 AM - 4 PM 





Eggs 

Peppers & Eggs 

French Toast 

Biscuits & Gravy 

Bacon 

Sausage 

Ham 

Pastries 



BBQ Ribs 

Pork Cutlets 

Eggplant Parmesan 

Quiche 

Egg Rolls 

Tacos 

And Salad Bar 



Adults $16.95 - Under 7yrs 1/2 Price - 



High Chairs Free 






Route 173 • Antioch • 847-395-4550 

MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY 






'. 




(847) 395-4704 

Open Daily 3:00 PM • Closed Tuesday 

(Formerly McDermits). 










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CV\urcV\ Services 



QJ BasUTs .&*iJy 














Main Street Car Wash 

• 2 Touchless Automatic Bays with Dryer • 4 Sett-Serve Bays 
• 1 Large Bay to Accommodate Trucks and RVs 
Spot Free Rinse • Foaming Brushes 




"All New" and Conveniently located 

456 Rt. 83. 4 blocks south of Rt 173 • Anlii 



. 83, 4 blocks south of Rt 173 • Antioch, It 60002 



838-9274 

We Value Your Business 




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I Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME MARKETER 



April 13, 2001 





make gardening easier 






For most people, gardening is a relaxing, 
outdoor activity, as much anticipated as the 
coming of spring. But for those of us without 
the requisite 'green thumb,' the stress of 
tending to a garden and generating flourish- 
ing produce or flowers can be a daunting task. 
Still for others, the simple action of bending 
down for a long period of time deters them 
from enjoying their spring pastime. 

Now, a different method of gardening, 
called raised-bed gardening, is increasing the 
enjoyment for gardeners everywhere, and 
making this sometimes strenuous activity 
productive and fun. Raised-bed gardens offer 



gardeners a number of advantages over con- 
ventional gardening. 

Because you can easily supply your own 
soil mix, raised beds enable you to improve . 
the quality of the soil where it naturally has a 
high clay content. The raised bed can also 
give you a head start on planting because its 
soil warms earlier than ground soil. You can 
work in wetter weather without getting your 
feet muddy or compacting the garden soil, 
and you can do less bending as you tend your 
plants and pick your vegetables. 

A typical raised garden consists of long 
beds six inches to three feet high. The beds 






should be no broader than you can reach, but 
they can extend as far as your property lines 
allow. The path between beds can be as nar- 
row as 1 2 inches or so. To prevent mud, you 
can top the path with gravel or build a pre- 
served wood walkway. 

Preserved wood is an excellent material to 
use when building raised beds. Because of its 
long life and ability to resist termites and de- . 
cay, pressure- treated wood is ideal for the 
garden. % : 

"Some organic gardening publications 
have objected to die use of preserved wood in 
gardens because of the chemicals used to 



pressure- treat the wood," said Mel Pine, 
manager of communications for the Ameri- 
can Wood Preservers Institute (AWPI) in Fair- 
fax, VA. "But research conducted by extension 
agents and academics in Texas found no 
cause for alarm." 

Nevertheless, Pine added, gardeners who 
are concerned may line the wood with heavy- 
duty plastic. A plastic drop cloth normally 
used for painting might be one inexpensive 
source for the plastic liner. 

Once the walls of the raised bed have 
been constructed, you can fill in the beds with 
soil and compost. Then you're set to plant 




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Team 

(847) 

838-MOVE 









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I Charming Colonial I I Cute As A Bugs Ear! I 






I VERY DESIRABLE 2 STORY with added up- I 
Hntnc CXr\i irmnl Lit^Hftr\ ujftclnrvH nrwH r nH O ctr\. 






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KELLER WILLIAMS 

REALTY 

STATE LINE 

■ 

1326 Main St. 
Antioch, IL 

1-800-322-5901 



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datos. Gourmot kitchon wAsland and cab. 2 sto- 

Iry toyor w/crystal chandoiier. 2 story brick firo- | 
placo. Largo dock. 3 bay garago. Outside light- I 
Iing! >}'".' 

Curt Miller/Cathy Welsch 
I 847-838-MOVE I 

#01021992 $385,000 



DELIGHTFUL HOME IN THE WOODS on a| 

■double lot and by the lake tool Ceramic tiio- 
llooring. Nowor carpel. Dock overlooking watorl | 



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Curt Miller/Cathy Welsch 
I 847-838-MOVE I 

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* I Fox Lake Lakefront I | 

I EVERY ROOM REMODELED, new healing I I 
and air. Hardwood lloor. Corrian countortoD and ■ ■ 



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countortop 

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window In living room! 

Curt Miller/Cathy Welsch 
847-838-MOVE 

| #01033976 $219,900 

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Crooked Lake 



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#00203232 $139,900 



I ADORABLE CHALET HOME with throe bod-| 
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I Curt Miller/Cathy Welsch . 

847-838-MOVE ■ 

$149,900 | 




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Executive 2 Story 

BEAUTIFUL CONTEMPORARY locatod on a 
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ceilings, marble firoplaco, wrap around porch , 
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Curt Miller/Cathy Welsch 
847-838-MOVE . 
#00219403 * $184,900 



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Cozy Ranch 



SPACIOUS ROOMS. Largo living room and 
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Curt Miller/Cathy Welsch 

847-838-MOVE 

#01053312 $145,000 




Too New 



For Photo 



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Each Office Independently Owned & Operated 



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Call Direct at ( 8 47) 838-MOVE 






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April 13, 2001 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B23 



Alan Philip Wears 

Age 59, was born on March 14, 194 i in New Richmond, Wis. 
the first born of PhlHp and Evelyn Wears, They moved to Amery, 
Wis. in 1946 and Alan graduated from Amery High School in 1959. 
He then joined the Navy in 1960 and served as a fire control tech- 
nology Instructor for the next eight years including duty aboard a 
destroyer. 

After his discharge as a 1st Class Petty Officer, Alan, became a 
drywallcr In the Lake County area. He was very active through his 
life in the Jaycecs, then the Men's Club and Carpenter's Union 
until his death. Alan enjoyed gardening, golfing, pool, Green Day 
Packer/Dears rivalry and was an avid card player. 

Alan is survived by his mother, Evelyn Jackelen of Amery, 
Wis.; children, David (Dianna) ofAppIeton, Wis,, Zarabeth (Greg) 
Jackson of Cathedral City, Calif., Samantha (Brian) Magnuson of 
Sky Valley, Calif.; three grandsons, Philip, Jacob and Benjamin of 
Appleton, Wis.; sisters, Karen (Don) Hcnrlkson, Missoula, Mont., 
Sandic (Eddie) Nihiscr of Amery, Wis., Sylvia (Carl) Kozak of 
Hayward, Wis., Lois (John)Pcper of Frederic, Wis., and Sidney 
(Lee) Jones of Amery, Wis.; and two brothers, Curtis (Sue) and 
Raymond of Amery, Wis.; 22 nieces and nephews and 17 grand- 
nieces and nephews, stepbrother, Jim (Joanne) Jackelen and Judy 
Salzman of Milwaukee, Wis., dear friend Helen Lien and many 
other relatives* and friends. He is preceded in death by his father, 
Philip; step-father, Charles Jackelen; one nephew and two step- 
brothers. 

"We once were eight, but now seven and one In heaven." 

Marion H. Stephens 

Age 79 of Round Lake Park passed a way on Sunday, April 8, 
2001 at her residence. Marion was bom on May 21, 1921 in Oak 
Park to the late Arthur (Margaret) Conrad. 

Marions leaves her children, Barbara Heath of Crystal River, 
Fla., Judith Shaffer of Ml. Morris, Mich., Margaret (Bill) Becker of 
Round Lake Park, Susan (John) Brocchini of Round Lake Park and 
Richard (Cathy) Grubcr of Ingleslde; 22 grandchildren and 23 
great grandchildren. She is preceded In death by her husbands, 
Edward Gruber and Wilson Stephens and daughter, Marion 
PatcnasaV 

Funeral Services and interment were privately held. 

Funeral Arrangements were entrusted to Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake. 

George Albert Sihvonen 

Age 85 of Gurnec, formerly of Waukcgan. passed away on 
April 5, 2001. He was born in Waukcgan on Dec. 22, 1915. In 1946 
he married Melba Lappi in Waukegan. 

He is survived by his wife, Melba; daughters. Sandra (Chris) 
Etting of Florida, Susan Conner of Wisconsin, Marilyn (Don) Cook 
ofWadsworth and Shelley (Alan) Cole of Manville; seven grand- 
children. "^' 

Services were privately held. 

Arrangements were entrusted Jo Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake. 

Iieselotte (Lottie) Marie Lesnewski 
(nee Koenigstein) 

Age 80 of Graysiake, passed away on April 8, 2001 at Condell 
Medical Center in Libcrtyville. Lottie was born on Feb. 19, 1921 in 
Frankfurt, Germany and became a naturalized citizen on April 1, 
1952. 

Lottie leaves her husband, William W. Lesnewski of Grayslake 
and a daughter, Karen (Jahn) Schrocdcr of Schaumburg. She Is 
preceded in death by her parents. 

.Visitation was held from 4 p.m. until time of Memorial 
Service which was held 6-30 p.m., April 12 at the Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake with Rev. Paul Galchutt 
of Shepherd of the Lakes Lutheran Church', Grayslake officiating. 

Interment was privately held. 

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Sav-A- Pet, 31664 
N. Fairfield Rd., Grayslake, IL 60030 in her memory. 

Virginia L Parry 

Age 90, passed away on Saturday, April 7, 2001 at Retama 
Manor Nursing Home. She went home to be with our Lord and his 

Mother, to whom she had great devotion. 

She was born in Chicago on Dec 12, 1910 on the Feast of the 
Virgin of Guadalupe to Frank and Rose Ellen Lowe. Upon retire- 



ment in 1977, she and her husband moved to Clearwater, Fla., 
and lived there until she relocated to Harlfngen.Tex. in 1994. 

She Is survived by her daughter, Ellen (Charles) Tresch of 
Harlingen, Tex. and two sons, Raymond (Linda) Parry of Cape 
Coral, Fla. and Michael (Bonnie) Parry of Ingleslde; five grand- 
children and five great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her 
sister, Margaret of Palatine and numerous nieces and nephews. 
She is preceded in death by her husband, Raymond E. Parry. 

A Memorial Service and burial will be held at Mt. Carmel 
Cemetery In Chicago at a later date. 

Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of 
donor's choice. 

Arrangements were entrusted to Buck Ashcraft Funeral 
Home, Harlingen, Tex. 

Jay 'Bud 9 Gilbertson 

Age 41 of Spring Grove passed away April 4 at home. Jay was 
bom Sept. 12, 1959 in Libertyville. He worked as a machinist for 
Olsen Machine in Spring Grove. 

Survivors Include his fiance* Carole Gillespie; a daughter, 
Amanda Gilbertson, his parents, Patt and Toby Johnson, his 
grandmother, aunts and many cousins. 

Visitation was held from 1-2 p.m. until time of the Memorial 
Service at 2 p.m., April 7 at the Marsh Funeral Home Ltd., 
Lindenhurst. 

Interment was privately held at Highland Memorial 
Cemetery, Libcrtyville. 

Kyran J. 'Bud 9 Kirby 

Age 70 of Round Lake Beach, passed away March 29, 

2001 at die Vet crane Administration Medical Center in 

North Chicago. He was born In Chicago on Aug. 3, J 930. 

He served In the U.S. Army during the Korean Conflict. 

Survivors Include two nieces, Kathy Trost, Monroe, Wis. and 

Lori Kirby, Anlloch; nephews Michael Kirby, Mc Henry; Kevin 

Kirby, Escondido, Calif, and Shawn Kirby, Mundelein, several 

grand nieces and grand nephews. 

Memorial Service was held at noon, April 12 at the Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake with Rev. Fr. 
James Merold officiating. 

Interment took place at Avon Centre Cemetery, 
A location of gathering will be held at a later date. 





Judith A. Prince)! 

Age 65 of Evanston, passed away Saturday, March 31, 2001 at 
the Highland Park HospltaL She was born Nov. 25, 1935 In 
Evanston. .jr 

Survivors include her children, Dr. Mark (Joy) Princell of fHuth E, Jedele 



Dloomington. 

Surviving arc her sons, James (Susan) Snell III and Timothy 
(Lynn) Snell, both of Libcrtyville; five grandchildren; two great 
grandchildren, a brother and a sister. She is preceded In death by 
her first husband James Snell Jr. in 1951 und second husband 
Charles Swan In 1988. 

Visitation of family and friends was held 4-8 p.m. April 7 at 
the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Libertyville. 

Funeral Service was held 2 p.m., April 8 at SL Lawrence 
Episcopal Church, Libcrtyville. 

Memorial contributions can be made to the SL Lawrence 
Episcopal Church Foundation, 125 W. Church St., Libertyville, IL 
60048 in her memory. 

Ralph J. Morten sen 

Age 72 of Lake VIII a, passed away at his home on Friday, 
April 6, 2001. He had served In the U.S. Army during the 
Korean Conflict. 

He is survived by his wife, Carol; children, James (Georjanne) 
of Lake Villa and Kathy (Daniel) Fchrenbacherof Antioch; grand- 
children, sister and brothers. 

Visitation of family and friends will be held April 14 from 
3:30-5:30 p.m. at the Ringa Funeral Home, 122 S. Rte. 83 
(Milwaukee Ave.), Lake Villa. 

Memorial Service will be held 530 p.m.« Saturday, April 14 at 
Ringa Funeral Home with the Rev. Joseph Boerman, pastor of 
Immanuel Baptist Church, officiating. 

Interment will be private. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials will be appreciated to the Lake 
Villa Volunteer Fire Department or Vista Star Hospice. 

Joseph W. Thomas 

Age 72 of Round Lake Beach, passed away Sunday, April 8, 
2001 at Northern Illinois Medical Center In McHenry. He was 
born on June 14, 1928 in Hannibal, Mo. 

Survivors include his wife, Rosemary (nee Zaiokar) Thomas 
of Round Lake Beach; sons, Joseph Thomas and Larry (Hilda) 
Thomas both of Round Lake and Russell (Judy) Thomas in 
Colorado, James (Katherine) Thomas in Wisconsin; daughters, 
Linda Sue Thomas of Round Lake Beach, Marina (Dr. Michael) 
Lesser of Crystal Lake and Christina Thomas of Ann Arbor, 
Mich; 10 grandchildren, a great-grand daughter,- brothers and a 
sister. 

A Funeral Blessing was held 10 a.m. April 11 at the Strang 
Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment followed at Ascension Cemetery, Libertyville. 



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Greenville, SC, Lori (Steve) Hoelle, Eric (Bobbl) Princell and 
Kristin Ward,* all of Oxford, Ohio; grandchildren, sisters, a brother 
and many nieces, nephews and cousins. 

Services and interment were private. 

Memorial contributions can be made to Albany t^re, 901 
Maple St., Evanston, IL 60602 - 

Arrangements were entrusted to the Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home In Libertyville. 

Janice 6. Grundberg 

Age 64 of Green Oaks, passed away Thursday, April 5, 2001 at 
the Condell Medical Center In Ubertyville. She was born Nov. 6, 
1936 in Tooele, Utah. 

Surviving are her husband, Ronald and daughter, Jennifer 
Grundberg, both of Green Oaks; sons, Glenn (Lynette) of 
Libertyville, Paul (Suzanne) of Round Lake Beach, Peter (Almee) 
of Woodstock, Steven and Andrew, both of Provo, Utah and Phillip 
of Ubertyville; 10 grandchildren and her mother, Grace Ahlers, 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Funeral Service was held at 11 a.m. April 9 at the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Buffalo Grove. 

Interment followed at Willow Lawn Memorial Park in Vemon 

Hills. 

Visitation was from 3-8 p.m. April 8 at the Burnett-Dane 

Funeral Home, Libertyville. 

Memorial contributions can be made to the Perpetual 

Education Fund at her church. 

Elizabeth J, 'Betty' Swan 

Age 80 of Libertyville, passed away Wednesday, April 4, 2001 
at the Libertyville Manor. She was born March 14, 1921 In 



Age 96 of Antioch passed away Monday, April 9, 2001 at her 
home. She was born June 5, 1904 In North Bend, Wis., the daugh- 
ter of the late James and Jennie (Wilson) Thomas. On Aug. 5, 1943, 
she married Norman Jedele in Wllmot, Wis., he preceded her in 
death on Nov. 23, 1990. 

Survivors include one son, John (Mary) of Antioch; a daugh- 
ter, Rhoda (Milton) Urbates of Beach Park; and five grandchll- 

dren. 

Funeral Services were held 7 p.m. April 1 1 at Strang Funeral 

Home of Antioch. 

Interment was private. 

Those desiring may make contributions to .the Antioch 
Rescue Squad or the Antioch Mental Health Association In her 
memory. 

Leo E. 'Farina' Blackowicz 

Age 78 of North Chicago, died Sunday, April 8, 2001 at his 
home. He was bom March 17, 1923 in North Chicago. He was 
employed at U.S. Steel and Wire and retired from JAK Industrial 
Supply. 

He Is survived by his wife of 53 years, Jean (nee Rajuniec); 
sons, Robert (Patty) Blackowicz of Flskers, Ind. Michael (Laurie) 
Blackowicz of Bristol, Wis. and David Blackowicz of North 
Chicago; five grandchildren and brothers. 

Visitation was held from 4-7 p.m. and Funeral Service was 
held at 7 p.m., April 11 at the Salata Funeral Chapel, North 
Chicago. * v 

Interment was private. 



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JUSTENS ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court 
(Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847)546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, 

Directors 
* Additional Locations in 
McHenry and Wonder Lake 



KJt HAMSHER 
FUNERAL HOME, LTD, 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rd„ Fox Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, 
Debra Hamsher Glen, Directors 



RINGA 
FUNERAL HOME ' 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., 
Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2146 . 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL 
CHAPEL AND CREMATORIUM 

t ■ » 

LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake; IL 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang 

and 

Richard A Gaddis, 

Directors 



STRANG 
FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St, Antioch, IL 
(847) 395-4000, 

Dan Dugenske, 
Director 



Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium 



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SYMONDS-LAKES 

FUNERAL 

HOME 

1 1 1 W. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847) 543-1080 

Matthew J. Symonds, 

Director 

Additional Locations 

in Chicago & Highwood 



FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED 

ESTABLISHED 1898 

410 East Belvidere Road 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8122 

David G. Strang • Richard A. Gaddis 

Directors 






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B24/ Lakeland Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Computational 

' Tools 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Provide 

Engineering Computational tools to 

government & Industry * 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 8797 

Roanoake Ct., Gurnoe, IL 60031, 

(847) 855-7903, 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING John Aldrln, 
6797 Roanoake Gt„ Gurnoe, IL 

60031 , (847) 855-7903. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
" COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

Thi3 Is to certify that tho under- 
signed lntend(8) to conduct tho above 
named business Irom the locatlon(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
j name(s) of tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/a/ John Aldrin 

March 16, 2001 

The forogolng Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son{s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 16lh day of March 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Ivette M. Diaz 

Notary Public 

. - Received: Mar 16, 2001 

Willard R. Helander 

Lako County Clerk 

0301E-3964-GP 

March 30, 2001 

April 6, 2001 

April 13 2001 



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PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Hoallhtoch 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Hoalthy living 
technologies, air and water purifica- 
tion etc. 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 24687 

Lake Shore Dr., Round Lako, IL 

60073.(847)546-5216. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Michael J. 
Black, 24667 Lake Shoro Dr„ Round 
Lako, IL 60073, 
(847)546-5216. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that tho under- 
signed lntond{s) to conduct the above 
named business from tho locatlon(s) 
Indicated and that tho true or real futl 
namo{s) of tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Michael J. Black 
March 1 6, 2001 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 16th day ol March 2001 . 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Ivette M. Diaz 

Notary Public 

Recelvod: Mar 1 6, 200 1 

Willard R. Holander 

Lako County Clerk 

0301E-3956-RL 

March 30, 2001 

April 6, 2001 

April 13 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

WARREN TOWNSHIP HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Notice Is hereby given that sealed proposals will bo rocoivod at the office of Town 

Clerk at 17601 Wost Washington Street, Gurnoe, Illinois 60031 until 10:00 o'clock 
A.M., Monday April 23, 2001, lor furnishing tho following equipment: 

One (1) 2001 18,000 lb. Union City Walk-In Van 

Proposals shall be mado on forms furnishod by the Township Highway 
Commissioner, and Shall bo addressed In a sealed envelope to Warron Township 
Hi ghway Department. C/O Margaret Keonan-Dennlston, Town Clerk and shall be 
marked "Walk- In Van" 

Letting of Monday April 23, 2001, Warren Township. Further information regarding 
tho letting may be obtained by contacting tho Highway Commissioner at (847) 244- 
11O1.ext.301. 

The Township in accordance with the laws of the State of Illinois heroby notifies an 
bidders that it will affirmatively Insure that the contract entered Into pursuant to this 
advertisement will bo awarded to the lowest responsible bidder without discrimination 

on the grounds of Race, color, or national origin. 

The awarding authority reserves tho right to waive technicalities and to reject any 
or all Proposals as provided in article 1 02.08 of the "Standard Specifications tor Road 
and Bridge Construction," prepared by tho Department of Transportation. 

Warren Township Highway Commissioner 

0401B-39B1-GEN 
April 13, 2001 



STATE OF ILUNOIS 



COUNTY OF LAKE 



) 
)SS 

) 

PUBUC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
INTHE MATTER OFTHE ESTATE OF ) 
LORRAINE W.REUM, ) No. 01 P 266 

DECEASED ) 

CLAIM NOTICE 
NOTICE IS GIVEN OF THE DEATH OF LORRAINE W. REUM n\ Waukegan, 

County of Lako, State of Illinois. Letters of Office were Issued on Ar ill 2, 2001, to 
DARLENE POLSGROVE, 591 Roosevelt Court, Grayslako, IL 60030 vhose attorney 
is James W. Kalsor, Esq., 121 East Liberty Street STE 3. Wauconda, IL 60084 

Claims against the Estate may bo filed In the Office of the Clerk of Court at 17 N. 
County Street, Waukegan, IL or with the representative, or both, within six (6) months 
from tho date of issuance of letters and any claim not filed within that period Is barred. 
Copies of a claim tiled with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representa- 
tive and to the attorney within ten (10) days after It has been filed. 

James W. Kaiser, Esq 

(Attorney) 
James W. Kaiser, Esq 
Richard J. Nakon & Associates 

121 East Liberty Street 
Wauconda, IL 60084 
(847) 526-0626 
(847) 526-7456 

0401B-3980-GL 
April 13, 2001 



STATE OF ILLINOIS 



) 

)SS 



COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

PUBUC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
IN THE MATTER OFTHE ESTATE OF ) 
MARLENEB.BOHL ) No. 01 P 267 

DECEASED ) 

CLAIM NOTICE 
NOTICE IS GIVEN OF THE DEATH OF MARLENE B. BOHL ol Village ol 
Wauconda, County of Lake, State of Illinois. Letters of Office were Issued on April 2, 
2001, to ERIC W. BOHL of 4831 Tarrlngton Drive, Hoffman Estates, IL 60010 and 
DEBORAH BRINKER, 24452 Highview, Anlloch, IL 60002 whose attorney is James 
W. Kaiser, Esq., 121 East Liberty Street STE 3, Wauconda, IL 60084 

Claims against tho Estate may be filed In the Offico of the Clerk ol Court at 17 N. 
County Street, Waukegan, IL or with the representative, or both, within six (6) months 
from the date of issuance of letters and any claim not filed within that period Is barred. 
Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or doliverod to the representa- 
tive and to the attorney within ten (10) days after It has been filed. 

James W. Kaiser, Esq 

(Attorney) 

James W. Kaiser, Esq 
Richard J. Nakon & Associates 
121 East Liberty Street 
Wauconda, IL 60084 
(847) 526-0626 
(847) 526-7456 

0401B-3979-AN 
April 13,2001 



LEGAL NOTICES 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Artistic Touch 
Taxldormy 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Taxldormy 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 26183 
Rollins Rd„ Inglosldo, IL 60041. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Richard 
Pawolczyk, 26183 Rollins Road., 
Ingleslde.lL 60041, 
(847) 587-0275. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed Intond(s) to conduct tho above 
named business from tho locatlon(s) 
Indicated and that tho true or real full 
namo(s) of tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/aro correct as shown, 
/s/ Richard Pawelczyk • 
March 27, 2001 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 27th day of March 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Ivette M. Diaz 

Notary Public 

Rocorved: Mar 27, 2001 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0401A-3966-FL 

April 6, 2001 

April 13, 2001 

April 20,2001 

PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Architectural 

Wood Interiors 

NATURE/PURPOSE: . Custom 
Woodworking 
•ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 33 S. Lake 
Ave., Lako Villa, IL 60046, (847) 223- 

6745. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Leonard 
Bookman, 33 S. Lako Ave., Lake Villa, 
IL §0046. (847) 223-6745. Laura 
Bockman 33 S. Lako Avo„ Lako Villa. 

IL 60046, (647) 223-6745. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from tho location(s) 
Indicated and that tho true or, real full 
namo(s) of the person (s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
is/aro correct as shown, 
/s/ Leonard Beckman 

March 28, 2001 
/s/ Laura Beckman 
March 28, 2001 ' 

Tho foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per* 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 28th day ol March 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Eleanor A. Potruska 

Notary Public 

Received: Mar 28, 2001 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0401A-3968-LV 

April 6, 2001 

April 13, 2001 

April 20, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Leader 

Creations 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Web Design & 

Hosting Services 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 20805 N. 
Elizabeth St., Prairie View, IL 60069, 
(847)215-9315. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Anouch 
Laedor, 20805 N. Elizabeth St, Prairie 
View, IL 60069, (847) 215-9315. 
Thomas Laeder, 20805 N. Elizabeth 
St., Prairie View, IL 60069, (847) 215- 
9315 

STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business Irom tho locatlon(s) 
Indicated and that tho true or real full 
namo(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Anouch Laeder 
February 23, 2001 
/s/ Thomas Laeder 
February 23, 2001 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before mo by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 23rd day of February. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Sandra Lee A. Ballok 

Notary Public 

Recelvod: Mar 29, 2001 

Willard R. Holander 

Lake County Clerk 

0401A-3970-LB 
* f:i ; April 6, 2001 

April 13, 2001 
April 20, 2001 



PUBUC NOTCE 

NOTICE OF 

MECHANICS UEN 

In pursuant to Chaptor 770 ILCS 
45/1 ET SEO. and Chaptor 770 ILCS 
9071 ET SEO., a mechanics lion Is 
being mado against William S.Yoshlka 
In tho amount of $9,419.00 for ser- 
vices rendered 'end storage chargos 
for 1992 Morcury Sabio Identification 
number 1MECM5347NG603943. 

If said chargos aro not paid in full 
within 30 days from date of this notice, 
vehicle will be disposed of pursuant to 
Chapter 82, Paragraph B, 

Dated 8-28-00 

Thomas Voploy (Manager) 

Waukegan-Gurnee Auto Body, Inc. 

3923 Grove 

Gurnoe, IL 60031 

0301E-395O-GP 

March 30, 2001 

April 8, 2001 

April 13, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Resumes By 

Doug 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Resume and 
Business Research Sorvteo 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 3478.1 N. 
Augustana Ave., Ingloslde, IL 60041, 
(847) 546-6906. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Howard D. 

Richards, 34781 N. Augustana, 
Ingloslde, IL 60041, 

(847) 546-6906. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undor- 
slgnod Intond(s) to conduct tho above 
named business from tho location(s) 
Indicated and that tho true or real full 
namo(s) of tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/aro correct as shown. 
Is/ Howard D, Richards 
April 5, 2001 

* Tho foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 5th day of April 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Anna Modov 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr. 5. 2001 

Wiltard R. Holander 

Lako County Clerk 

0401B-3977-FL 

April 13, 2001 

April 20, 2001 

April 27, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPUCATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Quality Sense 
USA 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Quality and 
Business consulting, Internet retail 
and advertising 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 61 
Coventry Cove Ln., Lako Villa, IL 
60046, (847) 265-5093. (physical) 34 
W. Grand Ave., Fox Lake IL 60020, 
(847) 973-9245. (Mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Gene Amlstanl, 61 Coventry Cove Ln., 
Lako Villa, IL 60048, (847) 265-5093. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intond(s) to conduct the above namod 
business from tho locations) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or roal futl 
namo(s) of tho porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Gene Amlstanl 
March 21, 2001 

The foregoing Instrument was 

acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 21st day of March, 2001. 

OFFICIAL* SEAL 
Isl Sharon A. Christonson 

Notary Public 

Received: March 23, 2001 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0301E-3962-LV 

March 30, 2001 

April 6, 2001 

. April 13, 2001 



' April 13, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

Withdrawal of Ownerf» or 

Cancellation 
NAME OF BUSINESS: L Fabian 
Chimney Sorvlcos 

Original Date Fllod 9-23-91 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to cortlly that the porson(s) 
listed below has/hovo ceased doing 
buslnoss undor tho ossumod name or 
has/havo no furthor connection or 
financial intorost In said business. 
Withdrawal shall bo effective March 

27,2001. 

Lawrence P. Fabian, 34820 N. 
Lakevlow Ct. t McHenry, IL 60050, 
(847) 587.3253 
Isl Lawronce P. Fabian 

Tho foregoing Instrumont was 
acknowledged before me by tho per- 
son^) withdrawing from the buslnoss 
this 27lh day of March, 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

William H. Bertram, Jr. 

Notary Public 

Rocoivod: March 29, 2001 

Willard R. Helander 

Lako County Clerk 

0401A-3965-FL 

April 6, 2001 

April 13, 2001 

April 20, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: C4L Sign Co, 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Wholosalo 

Signs 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 37562 N. 
Highway 12, Spring Grove, 60081, 

(847)973-1420. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Cynthia Hornandoz, 35706 Franklin 
Ave., InglosJdo. IL 60041, (847) 973- 

0901. 

STATE OF ILUNOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) ' ,,l : 

This Is to cortify that the under- 
signed Intond(s) to conduct tho above 
named business from tho tocation(s) 
Indicated and that the true or roal futl 
name(s) of tho person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/aro correct as shown. 

Isl Cynthia Hornandoz 

Tho foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by tho per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busl- 
noss this 30th day of March 200 1. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Martha Jano Gedvilas 

Notary Public 

Received: Mar 30, 200 1 

Wiltard R. Hetandor 

Lako County Clerk 

0401A-3969-FL 

April 6, 2001 

April 13,2001 

April 20, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPUCATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Be Safe 

NATURE/PURPOSE Classes in Firo 

Arms Safety 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 160 
Cecelia St., Grayslako, IL 60030, 
(847)223-1840. 

NAME(S) ANO POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Anthony D. 
Kallnowskl, 160 Cecelia St., 

Grayslako. IL 60030. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undor- 
signed intond(s) to conduct tho above 
namod buslnoss from tho tocation(s) 
Indicated and that tho true or real full 
namo(s) of tho person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tne business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Anthony D. Kallnowskl 
March 19. 2001 

Tho foregoing instrumont was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son's) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 9lh day of March 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 
Isl Eleanor A. Potruska 

Notary Public 

Received: Mar 19,2001 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0301E-3955-GL 

March 30, 2001 

April 8, 2001 

April 13 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF RULES AND REGULATIONS OFTHE BOARD OF 
FIRE COMMISSIONERS OFTHE GRAYSLAKE FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 

Notice is hereby given by the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Grayslako Fire 
Protection District that It has adoptod a sot of Rules and Regulations, which have 
been approvod at Us April 3 . 2001 meeting, and that Its Rulo3 and Regulations 
become effective ton days after the date that this notice is published, Copios of tho 
Rules and Regulations are available for review at the Grayslako Fire' Protection 
District, 160 Hawtey Road, Grayslako, Illinois, 60030 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. t 
Monday through Friday beginning ADliL4. 2001. , • 

. Board of Fire Commissioners 
Grayslako Flro Protoction District 

0401B-3974-GL 
April 13, 2001 



i 



' -«v 



; -*l 



April 13, 2001 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 




FROM PAGE Bl 



ROADS 



dress roadway design, drainage, 
environmental needs and public 
coordination issues. 

Projects outlined in the program 
include rehabilitation projects, 
which keep county highways in good 
condition, and operational and 
capacity, projects, which are 
designed to reduce traffic bottle- 
necks. 

Rehabilitation projects include 
programs such as resurfacing, 
bridgework, railroad crossing work 
and pavement patching. 

Operational and capacity projects 
include improving intersections and 
traffic signals, add lane projects and 
bike path work. 

According to County Engineer 
Marty Buehler, "Highway projects 
arc very complex efforts, with a 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Interior Pro's 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Leather, Vinyl, 

VoJour Repairs, Auio-Marlne 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: •Mobile 
Services" 25636 W. Raska Ln.. Lake 
Vma, IL 60046, (847) 587-9480. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Brad 
Undwall, 25636 W. Raska Ln., Lake 
Villa, IL 60046, (847) 587-9450. . 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to cortiry that the under- 
signed intond{s) to conduct the above 
named business from the tocalion(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
namo(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/&/ Brad Undwall 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per* 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 21st day of March 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Chartene Martinez 

Notary Public 

Received: Mar 26, 2001 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0301E-3963-LV 

March 30, 2001 
April 6, 2001 
April 13 2001 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Notice Is hereby given that SAFE- 
WAY SELF STORAGE, 1 100 
w. Rollins Road, Round Lake Heights, 
IL, 60073. will soil the personal goods 
Irom the following units to satisfy the 
lien of SAFEWAY SELF STORAGE 
(Seller) for rental and other charges 
due. 

UNIT NO. -01910 X 10 

OCCUPANT- Mario Cartsom 
CONTENTS - Stereo Equipment, 
Bedding, Combo Washer & Dryer, 
Microwave, Konmore Washer & Dryer. 
UNIT NO.- 1475X5 
OCCUPANT- Richard Becker 
CONTENTS - Men's Clothing, 
Suitcase, Children's Clothing, 
Ameritech Speaker Phones. 
UNIT NO. -3045X10 

OCCUPANT- James Zlelinskl 
CONTENTS - Washer & Dryer, Car 
Ramps, Engine Hoist, 2-Tlres & Rims 

& Model Cars. 
UNIT NO, -3075X10 
OCCUPANT - Theresa Gerblg 
CONTENTS - Wicker Shelving, 
Childrens* Toys, Twin Bed & Mattress 

and Coders. 

UNIT NO.- 24510X10 
OCCUPANT- Lynette Payne 
CONTENTS - Drosser, VCR Tapes, 
Miscellaneous Household Items, and 

Clothing 

UNIT NO. -41710X10 
OCCUPANT- Robby Schumacher 
CONTENTS - Rocking Chair, Glrfs 
Bicycle, Oak Furniture, King-Size Bed 

& Mattress. 

These Items and all items stored 
in the above units wQI be sold to the 
highest bidder for cash. Removal of ail 
Items from the premises must be with- 
in three days from date of sale and a 
security bond posted to cover same. 

Sale will be held on April 28, 200 1 , 
on the premises ol SAFEWAY SELF 
STORAGE, 1100 W. Rollins Road, 
Round Lake Heights, IL 60073, 
(Fairfield and Rollins Roads) at 
approximately 9:00 to 12:00 A,M. 
SAFEWAY SELF STORAGE reserves 
the right to withdraw any or all of the 
above mentioned items prior to sale. 
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCI- 
DENTS 

0401B-3982-RL 

April 13, 2001 
April 20, 2001 



number of regulatory and engi- 
neering challenges that need to be 
satisfied before construction can 
begin." 

"While this construction pro- 
gram will be beneficial to the county 
highway system, because of the 
growth in the county, it will not be 
enough to meet the present needs of 
Lake County with respect to the 
highway congestion issue," stated 
Diana O'Kelly, Lake County board 
member and Public Works and 
Transportation committee chain 

"The County Board has identi- 
fied transportation issues as a top 
goal and we will continue to seek 
financial solutions to this very 
important problem," added O'Kelly. 
"To that end a $120 million list of 
additional needed highway 
improvements has been Identified." 

The Lake County Division of 
Transportation provides engineer- 
ing, construction and maintenance 
on more than 280 miles of major 
arterial highways and 46 miles of 
bike facilities in the county. 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Urban Health 
Instruction 

NATURE/PURPOSE: First Aid CPR 

Instruction 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 1850 
Lewis Ave, North Chicago, IL 60064, 
(847) 596-8787, 
(847) 689-4978. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Dell L. 
Urban, 33143 N. Valley View, 

WOdwood, IL 60030, (847) 548-5412. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to cortify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
Indicated and that the true or real full 
name{s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/s/ Dell L Urban 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged belore me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day ol April 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Eleanor A. Petruska 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr. 5, 2001 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

. 0401B-397B-GL 

April 13, 2001 
April 20. 2001 
April 27, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: DBS Real 

Estate Services 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Real Estate 

Brokerage, Management & Related 

Sisrvicsfl 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY; 35943 N. 
Watson Ave, Ingleside, IL 60041 (847) 
587-9327. (physical) 
P.O. Box 24 Spring Grove, IL 60081, 
(847) 4 1 7-9095. (Mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Dale R. Shea, P.O. Box 24, Spring 
Grove, IL (847) 587-9327. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) v 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to cortiry that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business Irom the localion(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person{s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Dale R. Shea 
October 31, 2001 
8/ Date R. Shea 
April 5, 2001 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 5th day of April, 2001. ' 

♦OFFICIAL SEAL 

/&/ Barbara Erskln 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr. 5, 2001 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Cterk 

0401B-3978-FL 

April 13, 2001 
April 20, 2001 
April 27, 2001 



STUDY 



ted to the County Board on April 3 
Included the following findings: 
Only four of the 32 lakes were mod- 
erately nutrient enriched, 17 were 
highly nutrient enriched and 1 1 were 
severely nutrient enriched. Fifty per- 
cent of the lakes had moderate 
shoreline erosion and 44 percent 
had severe shoreline erosion. Sixty- 
six percent of the lakes provided 
habitat for state threatened and 
endangered bird species. Only 6 per- 
cent of the lakes had state threat- 
ened and endangered aquatic plant 
species. Forty-four percent of the 
lakes had the exotic, nuisance aquat- 
ic plant species known as Eurasian 

water milfoil (EWM). . 

"Oftentimes people who live on 
lakes don't know exactly how to 
manage them, but the lakes clearly 
are in need of protection and man- 
agement," said Galassie. "One asso- 
ciation may use a herbicide, without 
realizing mat other associations are 
too, and too much is going into the 
lake. Lakes Management helps form 
umbrella lake associations and 
works with them to solve problems." 

The 32 lakes featured in the 
study include: Ames Pit near 
Wadsworth; Bresen and Forest lakes 
near Hawthorn Woods; Brobcrg 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Effective 

Quality Systems 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Consulting with 

software development businesses 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 825 
Pheasant RkJge Drfve, Lake Zurich, IL 

60047, (847) 540-5920. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING R. Craig 
Smith, 825 Pheasant Ridge Drive, 
Lake Zurich, IL 60047. 

(847) 540-5920. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This b to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the locatJon(s) 
Indicatod and that the true or real full 
name{s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
1$/ R. Craig Smith 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 3rd day of April 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is! Barbara Erskln 

Notary Public 

Received: Apr. 3, 2001 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0401B-3975-WL 

April 13, 2001 

April 20, 2001 

April 27, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Medical E. 

Billing 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Data Process - 

Conversion of Doctor's bills to elec- 
tronic and paper forms 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 2256 N. 
Pheasant Ridge Ct, 
Round Lake Beach. IL 60073, 
(847)^356-7212. 

NAM E(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Marilyn B. 
Jeffries, 2256 N. Pheasant Ridge Ct, 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073. (847) 

356-7212. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) ol the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown, 
/a/ Marilyn B. Jeffries 
March 19,2001 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 19th day of March 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

1st Kristen L Kindly 

Notary Public 

Received: Mar 21, 2001 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

0301E-3954-RL 

March 30, 2001 

April 6, 2001 

ApriM3 2001 



Marsh, Lake Fairfield, Davis Lake 
and Owens Lake near Wauconda; 
Columbus Park Lake, Grassy Lake, 
Lake Falrview and Lake Lakeland 
Estates in the Barrington area; 
Countryside Lake near Mundelein; 
Cranberry Lake in Hainesville; Deer 
Lake, Redwing Slough and White 
Lake in the Antioch area; Echo Lake 
in Lake Zurich; Fourth Lake and 
Third Lake In the Third Lake area; 
Grandwood Park Estates near 
Gurnee; Harvey Lake and Lake 
Charles in., Vernon Hills; 
Independence Grove in 
Libertyvilie; Lake of the Hollow and 
Leisure Lake near Fox Lake; 
Potomac, Slough and Waterford 
lakes in the Undenhurst area; 



Salem Lake in Long Grove, Sand 
Lake near Zion; Valley Lake near 
Grayslake; and Timber Lake in unin- 
corporated Lake County. 

Lake County is home to approx- 
imately 230 inland lakes. The Health 
Department seeks to promote a 
countywide process to protect the 
environment and perpetuate the 
economic, recreational and aesthet- 
ic values of these lakes. The County's 
waters are under siege from soil ero- 
sion, nutrient overload, exotic 
species invasion, contamination, 
recreational use conflicts and over- 
crowding. For more Information, 
contact the Health Department's 
Lakes Management Unit at 360- 

6747. 



CLC 



tstration and advisement services. In 
a separate action, the board extend- 
ed the current out-of-disuict and 
out-of-state tuition rates through FY 
2003. Out-of-district tuition will 
continue at $177 per credit hour and 
out-of-state tuition at $248 per cred- 
it hour. 

During trustee reports, Board 
Chairman Richard Anderson asked 
the administration to send a letter to 
PACE requesting that the agency 
increase evening bus service for stu- 
dents attending classes at the 
Grayslake Campus, Expanding bus 
service to the campus has long been 
a concern of the board of trustees and 
the college administration. The 
request for the letter to PACE was 
made in response to concerns 
expressed by CLC students. 

In personnel matters, the board 
approved the appointment of three 
administrators. Cornelia Bakker was 
appointed dean of the Learning 
Resource Center, Kathleen Scatliffe- 
Wallace, assistant director of human 
resources; and David Weatherspoon, 



director of student services at 
Lakeshore Campus in Waukegan. 
The board also renewed the 
employment of administrative and 
professional staff for fiscal year 2002 
and granted professor emeritus sta- 
tus to art and humanities instructor 
Nancy Cook, after her retirement on 
May 31. Additionally, the board 
increased the rates of pay for part- 
time faculty teaching credit courses 
and continuing education and com- 
munity service courses, effective fall 
2001. The rates for part-time faculty 
teaching credit courses will be 
increased from $505, $530 and $555 
per equated load hour to $600, $625 
and $650. The rates for part-time 
instructors teaching continuing 
education and community service 
courses will be increased from $20, 
$22 and $24 per contact hour to $22, 
24 and $26. 

Finally, die board approved pur- 
chase contacts totaling approxi- 
mately $67,000 to maintain the 
computerized card catalog system, 
lease Microsoft software license and 
purchase an annual local area net- 
work subscription to access library 
databases. 




cess in the export market, and in 
1994, was recognized by the U.S. 
Department of Commerce for his 
work in increasing exports. 

He also has been active in the 
Illinois Manufacturers Association, 
serving as the director and vice 
chairman of its Political Action 
Committee. He has served as a direc- 
tor of Catholic Charities, and was 
elected a trustee emeritus of the Phi 
Kappa Theta Foundation, only the 
third person in the history of die 
Foundation to be so honored. 

Calabrese has been an active 
alumnus of the University of Illinois. 



He has been an Illinois Connection 
Ambassador since 1995. In 1998, he 
and his wife, Bette, established die 
Pat J. and Bette Calabrese 
Fellowship Endowment Fund, 
which supports graduate students 

inM&IE 

Pat and Bette Calabrese live in 
Lake Bluff. Their four children, 
Frank, Barbara Jean, Patrick and 
John, are all University of Illinois 

alumni. 

The Department of 

Mechanical and Industrial 
Engineering is among the top- 
ranked engineering programs In 
the nation, with 1,100 undergrad- 
uate and graduate students and 
nearly $13 million annually in 
external research funding. 



PUBUC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Jean Design 
NATURE/PURPOSE: Graphic Design 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 25626 

Somerset Ct., Hawthorn Wds., IL 
60047, (847) 540-0102. (physical) 
RO. Box 22, Lake Zurich, IL 60047, 
(847) 540-0102. (mailing) 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Jean K. 
Schmltz, 25626 Somerset Ct., 
Hawthorn Wds., IL 60047, 

(847)540-0102. • 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify lhat the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location(s) 
indicated and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown, 
/a/ Jean K. Schmltz 
March 22, 2001 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledfled before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of March 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is! Cindy Howser 

Notary Public 

Received: Mar 26, 2001 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Cleric 

0401A-3967-WL 

April 8, 2001 

April 13, 2001 

April 20, 2001 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Complete 

Exteriors 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Straighten AC 

Compressor Coils and Install Gutters 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1174 
Windbrooke Dr. #201, Buffalo Grove, 
IL 60089. (847) 366-3221. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING Fredric'M. 
Usak, 1174 Windbrooke Dr. #201, 
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089, 366-3221. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the under- 
signed Intend(s) to conduct the above 
named business from the location^) 
Indicated and lhat the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(a) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
la/are correct as shown, 
/s/ Fredric M. Usak 
March 21, 2001 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 33th day of February 2001. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Jeanette Metzger 

Notary Public 

Received: Mar 23, 2001 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Cterk 

0301E-3961-LB 

March 30, 2001 

" April 6, 2001 

April13 2001 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



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Unscramble the letters below, and learn 
about some of the different types of storms. 







1. This is a short, sudden, vio- 
lent windstorm 

that often is accompanied 

by rain or snow. 
QLALSU 

2. In this heavy snow- 
storm, which has high 

winds, people 
V can't see very far in 
Vj front of 

them. 
ZDLZABIR 

3. A waterspout is this happening 
over water. 

ROAONTD 






4. This type of storm is 
a very heavy rainfall 
NROPDWO 



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scrambled 



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lizzie below. See how many you can find and 



horizontally and vertically, backward and forward 



BAROMETER 
CLOUDY 
COLD FRONT 
DOWNPOUR 
DROUGHT 












FORECAST 
GALE 






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HEAT WAVE 

HUMID 

JET STREAM 

SNOW 

STORM 

TEMPERATURE 

WIND CHILL 



M U IDHTHGUORD 


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TEMPERATUREE 


LL IHSOTNOSTM 


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English:. 


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TOY 


Spanish: 


JUGUETE 


Italian: 


GIOCATTOLO 


French: 


JOUET 





Giovanni Piranesi begins his 
etchings of "Imaginary Prisons." 



Maria Theresa's husband 






Francis succeeds Charles 
VII as Holy Roman 
Emperor. 



•In King George's War, the 
British capture the French 
Fortress of Louisburg in . 
Canada. 
The French defeat Austrian, English 
and Dutch forces at Fontenoy. 



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SPIELZEUG 
CREPUNDIA 






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•Open Easter Sunday,April 15th I IAM-4PM 

• FREE Soft Play (Kiddie Playland) All Day!! 

•Discounted LazerTag $3 Per Game 

SKATE ALL DAY! 1 1 AM-4PM $5 Admission $2.50 Rental 

Urge I Topping Pizza, Pitcher of Soda, & $ 1 Fun Card For Only $ 1 5.99 



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April 13, 2001 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B2 7 




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scene; news, notes, results 



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sign-up* 
Basketball 

A long-standing youth basketball camp Is return- 
ing to liike Forest College this summer. 

The Future Stan Camp will be held In two ses- 
sions In July. It will run July 15-19 and July 22-26. K Is 
for boys ages 9- 18. 

"We have had many kids over the years come In 
from the Lakeland area. We have had kids from Grant, 
Warren, Grayslake, Mundelein, Ubcrtyville. What I en- 
joy about the camp the most Is the fact you work with 
kids at a lot of different ability levels from year to year 
and you can gauge their Improvement. It Is a pretty di- 
verse group. We offer groups from grade school to ju- 
nior high to high school," said Bob Ward. 

Ward spent six years as head coach at Wheaton 
North after a 10-year stint at Round Lake. Also on the 
staff are former Highland Park coach Mike Kolze and 
Norm Goodman, cx-Leydcn High coach. A commuter 
camp and a stay-over camp are offered. LFC facilities 
include a swimming pool, tennis, racquetball, and 
others. Meals arc Included. 

For Information, call the hotline at 630-4 15-3207. 

Final registration Is now being held for the Ten 
Star All Star Summer Basketball Camp. Boys, 
ages 8-19 and girls, ages 10-19, can apply. 

Players are selected by Invitation only. Past partic- 
ipants include Michael Jordan, Tim Duncan, Vince 
Carter, Jerry Stackhouse, Grant Hill, Bobby Hurley, 
An t awn Jamison, Christian Laettner, Tom Gugliotta 
and Trajan Langdon. Camp locations include Cham- 
paign, Macomb and Bedlands, Calif., to name a few. 

College basketball scholarships are possible for 
players named to The All Star American Team. For an 
evaluation form call (704) 568-6801 anytime. 
■Mike Small will ofTcr his very popular Funda- 
mental and Specialty Basketball Camps for boys 
and girls, grades 1-9 at 10 locations In Chicago and 
Northern suburbs this spring and summer 2001. Mike 
will include a camp at Woodland Middle School The 
date of the camp b July 23-27 at the following times: 

Boys/girts Grades 5-8 from 8:45-11 a-m.: an< 
boys/girls Grades 1-4 from 1 1 a.m.- 1:45 p.m. jT 

The camp will also have coach and professional 
player, Franz Calixte mn a Soccer Camp in Lincolnshire. 
Information and a registration form can be acquired at 
web site: www.mikc-smalLcom or call 635-8437. 

And, The Lake CountyThtmder basketball teams 

are hosting a threc-on- three basket ball tournament for 

girls and boys currently In fifth through 12th grades. 

The tournament will be held on April 27-29 at St. 
Bcdc School In Ingjesldc. located at Rtc. 59 and Wilson 
Rd If interested in signing up for the tournament or for 
father Information, call Barb Feldmann at 94 1-54 14. 



pus of NIU. The Academy Is designed for boys and girls 
ages 5- 1 8 offering specific programs for each age group. 
The Day Academy is offered June 25-29. The Resident 
Academy Is offered Jury 8- 1 2 and July 15-19. 

Specializing In team, Individual and goalkeeper in- 
struction. Each camper receives an Academy T-shirt 
and top professional instruction for an Intensive week 
of soccer training. For more Information or a free 

camp brochure call Coach Roy at (815) 753-1372. 
Basketball/volleyball 

Woodlands Academy of the Sacred Heart In 
Lake Forest Is offering summer volleyball and bas- 
ketball camps for girls grades 7-12. The camps run 
from June 11-16. Basketball will be held from 9 am.- 
12 noon with volleyball taking place from 1-4 p.m. 

Camps arc for all skill levels and will include in- 
struction In fundamentals, game strategy and game 
play. Each camp Is led by a Woodlands varsity coach 
and assisted by alumni players. 

Space is limited so girls are encouraged to register 
carry. Registration deadline Is Wed, June 6. The fee for 

each camp is S 100 per session. To register or for more 

information, please call Richard Rctyi, Sports Camp 

Coordinator, at 234-4300, cxt 304. 
Swimming 

TheMundelein Mustang Swim QubflMMSC) 
Is now accepting registration for interested youths 
ages 6-18 for its spring-summer season. MMSC is a 
year-round swim team offering professional instruc- 
tion, training and competition for swimmers of all 
abilities. The spring-summer season starts April 18 
and runs through July. For more information, please 
contact Sue Scholcs at 949-5099. 

Results 



• •»; i ■ 



• I * 



Northern Illinois University and head men's soccer 
l Willy Roy presents the Willy Roy Soccer Acad- 
at the HusWe Soccer Complex located on the cam- 



The Warren United U-12 Blazer girls soccer 
team started the spring season on a high note with a 
solid 5-1 victory over the Solidarity Snooting Stars. 
Abbey Ramsey started the scoring and notched her 
first Blazer goal with a fine shot just under the cross- 
bar on a direct kick from about the 18-yard box. Re- 
becca Tavior tallied the game- winning goal and added 
a second In the second half on assists from KIrsteri 
Bohmell and Lauren Glogovsky. Erin Mruz added two 
unassisted goals to yield the Blazers' final count Soli- 
darity scored early In the second half on a penalty kick 
but was otherwise stopped by goalkeeper Alicia Petro 
(two saves). 
Gymnastics 

Ail-Star Gym nasties, Vernon Hills 
Arnold Gymnastics Challenge 
AT-Col umb us, Ohio 
LeveU 
Age 7-9 

All Cast riano- Vault 8.15, 6th; Bars 73, 7th; Beam 
6.25; Floor 7.85, 6th; AA 30.15; Elizabeth Abushevitz- 
Vault 8.2; Bars 8.475, 9th; Beam 7.75; Floor 75; AA 
31525; Miranda Blood-Bars 6.1, Beam 5.0, Floor 6.6; 




Allison Kluvers-Vault 7.95, Bars 7.0, Beam 7.0, Floor 
6.6, AA 29575; Lauren Patterson-Vault 8.45,4lh; Bars 
8.45, Beam 8.1, 7th; Floor 7.7, AA 32.7; Jcnna Pryzbla- 
Vault 8.15,6th; Bars 8.45, Beam 8.1, 7th; Floor7.15,AA 
30D, 9th; AndrianaTompary-VauIt 8.4, 3rd; Bars 8.125, 
5th; Floor 7. 1 5, AA 305, 9th; Theresa Wojton-Vault 82, 
7th; Bars 7.0, Beam 7.65, Floor 7.2, AA 30.05; Caitlin 
Pagano-Vault 7 A, Bars 6.65, Beam 8.0, Floor 7.6, AA 
30.05; Kyle Greenberg-Vault 8.1, Bars 82, Beam 735; 
Paige Evans-Vault 7.0, Bars 7.0, Beam 7.7, Floor 7.7. AA 
28.9; Alex Kcssler-Vaul 1 83, Bars 7.9, Beam 7.7. 
Levels 
Age 10-12 

Nicole Greenwood-Vault 7.9, Bars 8.05, Beam 55, 
Floor 6.4, AA 2555; Megan Bestvina- Vault 8.0, Bars 
7.825. Bth, Beam 83, 3rd; Floor 835, AA 32.475, 7th. 

Kelsey Gustafson-Vault 9.0, 7th; Bars 95, 1st; Beam 
&45, 7th; Floor 9.025, 4th; AA 35575, 4th; Chelsie Se- 
plowin-Vault 8.60, Bars 8.8, Beam 7.6, Floor 8.85, 3rd; 
AA 33.85; Brittany Tazzioli-Vault 8.85, Bars 8.65, Beam 
75, Floor 855, AA 3355; Amanda Winn-Vault 9.05, 
2nd; Bars 9.05, 5th; Beam 75, Floor 8.6, 5th; AA 345, 
4 th; Stephanie Wojton-Vault 8.4, Bars 835, Beam 8.0, 
5lh; Floor 83, AA 33.05; Sarah Slutsky-Vault 8525, 6th; 
Ban 9.0, 3rd; Beam 7525, 8th; Floor 9.15, 1st; AA 345, 
7th; Jessica George-Vault 8.75, 8th; Bars 8.05, Beam 
755, Floor 8.6, 8th; AA 3255. 

Gym Spot, MundeJdn 

Illinois USAC State meet 
Level 8 MB 

AT- Rock Island 

Age 12 

Danielle Geary-Vault 9225, 8th; Bars 8.7, Beam 
755, Floor 8.65, All Around 34525. 
A«el3 

Elizabeth White-Vault 9.175, 8th; Bars 9.0. 13th; 
Beam 8.625, Floor 8.725, All Around 35525, 13th; Jen- 
nifer Wallace- Vault 8.775, Bars 83, Beam 85, Floor 85, 
All Around 34375. 
Asel4 

Jessica Ant oni- Vault 9.15, 5th; Bars 8.65, Beam 8.6, 
Floor 9.0, All Around 35.40, 10th. 
AgelS 

Melissa Gleason-Vault 9.05, 6th; Bars 8.7, Beam 
8575, 6th; Floor 855, 5th; All around 35375, 5th. 



Boys 
7th grade 

Stevenson 45, Bartlett 44 
Winnetka 3 1 , Stevenson 22 
Stevenson 52, Vemon Hills 4 1 
Stevenson 51, Antioch 17 
Stevenson 35, Mundelein 24 
Stevenson 50, Carmel 38 
Stevenson 52, Antioch 26 
Stevenson 43, Carmel 42 
Stevenson 46, Ubcrtyville 35 
Stevenson 48, Mundelein 33 
Stevenson 33, Warren 31 
Liberryville 40, Stevenson 32 
Warren 50, Stevenson 46 
Stevenson 51, Vemon Hills 17 
Warren 51 , Stevenson 40 
Stevenson 27, Mundelein 15 
Stevenson 36, Vemon H ills 26 





~li 




Ir. Patriot guis 

wh grade 

Ubcrtyville 21, Stevenson 19 
Stevenson 43, Vemon Hills 14 
Stevenson 48, Carmel 16 
Stevenson 52. North Chicago 1 8 
Stevenson 42, Carmel 7 
Stevenson 54, Mundelein 3 
Stevenson 28, Larkin 16 
Stevenson 19, Schaumburg 17 



In indoor soccer action, the Mundelein Magic 
UlOguis soccer team blanked the QaTigerCubs 5- 
0. M undelein's normally stingy defense kept Ela off the 
scoreboard while the offense remained potent with an 
explosion of goals. 

Goals came eariy and often for the Magic, break- 
ing at halftime with a 3-0 lead. Emily Peel put 
Mundelein on the scoreboard In the ninth minute, 
followed by Chelsea Grant In the 1 1 th and Jamie Ra- 
sorln the 18th minute. With Michelle Rowley and 
Tory Dohm solidifying the center of the Magic de- 
fense. Ela had few good chances at the goal, protect- 
ed by Nikki Allen. 

Jessie Vogel and I enna Schiller tallied for the Mag- 
ic to complete the scoring. With defense anchored by 
Kim Carroll, Alii Havlik. Allison Hanas and Gina lorio 
Mundelein held off a last minute push by the Tiger 
Cubs. 

Mundelein began their outdoor season. 
Mundelein Soccer 
Traveling Association 

Division U-l 3 

Mundelein Magic 1, Glen view Titans Gold 1 

Goals: Shannon Duffin 
Team Roster 

Carrie Bader, Mae Armer, Katie Michelau, Lo ri Li - 
vas, Heather Ryan, Kelsey Lallensack, Danielle 
Soudan, Shannon Duffin, Jacqui lorio, Dari Brooks, 
Jessica Frainey, Shara Swager, Beth Ludwick, Kelll 
Goodwin, Brittany UOiefl 
Lake Zurich Soccer Association 
U-ll 
Girls 

Qa Tigers 0, Ubcrtyville Black 2 

Offensive standouts: Christine Brzuszklewicz, 
Genevieve Freeman / > 
•Defensive standouts: Natalie Daab, Mary Rose 
Hembd 
















For the local crafter, 
show visitor and collector 



The Midwest Country Peddler bas something for everyone 





From local exhibits and 

clubs to the larger shows 

and collectors societies, 

the Midwest Country 

Peddler gives you monthly 

updates of show listings 

and event details. 



For $24.95 for 12 

issues, the Midwest 

Country Peddler 

keeps you in 

touch with the 

things you want to 

see and do. 



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COUNTRY 




•Hd Know Hfwi ttu Wvt ft GojW Mm Yto Short St Thtn' 




MEDIA 



30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake IL 60030 

(847) 223-8161 






















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COUNTY 



/Ipr// /3, 2001 



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Placing your personal ad is fast, safe and easy* Call 1-800-407-6318 
Respond to personal ads and browse others* Call 1-900-896-5999 






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KIND-HEARTED? 

Honost SWF, 63, 5'2\ height/weight propor-' 
lionato, brown hair/oyos, likos traveling, fino 
dining, cooking and gardening. ISO honost, 
humorous SWM, 55-75, for Iriondshlp. 
Ad#. 1457 

CANT HARDLY WAIT 

To moot you! Tho happiest day in the life of 
this WF, 52, lovos Groat Danes, walks, bicy- 
cling, will bo whon I moot you! ISO com- 
panionship and fun with a compatible WM, 
50-70, loves dogs. Adtf. 1453 

I AM THE ONE FOR YOU 

Honost. romantic, fun-loving SH mom, 20, 
4*0", 154lbs. Hoping to meet a romantic, 
honest SM, 20-25, who knows how to treat 
and respect me. Adtf. 1450 

^CALL FOR DETAILS 

Fun, easygoing, down-to-earth SF, 18, 5'8\ 
I65lbs., with black hair and brown eyos, 
who likes movies, reading, swimming, ISO 
fun, down-to-earth SWM. 19-26. Ad#.1440 

GENTLE 
I'm a gentle SWF princess. I'm wise, roman- 
tic, slender, attractive, young-looking, 48, 
agnostic and atheistic. I seek a chivalrous, 
easygoing genlloman, for eventual mar- 
riage andfor a deep love. Adtf.5220 

COMPATIBLE? 

Attractive WWWF, 60, ST. N/S, enjoys din- 
ing in/out, travol and quiot timos. Sooks a 
dopondaWo SWM, 58-65, with similar inter- 
ests. Ad#. 1402 

NEW EXPERIENCES 

SWF, 46, 5T, 170lbs.. auburn hair and 
hazel oyes. Sho is alfoctionato, honost, and 
enjoys good communication, plays, reading 
and much more. .Sho is seeking a SWM, 
40-56, who sharos thoso • interests and 
more. Ad#.5296 

SERIOUS-MINDED 

SBF f 28* 5'2", brown hair/eyes, mocha com- 
plexion, enjoys outdoors, movies, plays and 
comedy shows. Sooks an honest, mature, 
good-listener SWM, 28-38. Adtf. 1376 

OLDER GENTLEMAN 

Kind, honost, attractive, petito SWF, 28, 
5'4", 115lbs., long brown hair, btuo oyes, 
enjoys shopping, dining out, movios, sooks 
SWM, 67-80, for friendship. Adtf. 1362 

ISO HONESTY 

Outgoing, humorous SWF, 51, 5'2", 105lbs„ 
groon oyos, enjoys dancing, reading, tho 

•lor. sooks giving, fair, personable SWM, 

i0-55. for friendship. Adtf.1 367 

SHAREYOURTIME 

With a cute, personable WF, 49, 5*3", lull- 
figured, rod hair, enjoys travel, nature, 
shopping, camping, bicycling, sightseeing 
and animals. ISO easygoing WM, 45-55, 
N/S.Ad#.1363 

ALL THIS AND MORE 

Open-minded, young at heart, fun-loving 
SWF, 59. searching for a SWM, 54-70, to 
share movios, dancing, talking, walking and 
tho happiness In life. Ada. 1361 

CUDDLY AFFECTIONATE 

WF, 56, 5T, blond, blue eyes, loves laugh- 
ter, life and pooplo, arts & crafts, oarage 
sales, boating, the outdoors, gardening, 
animals. ISO honest, sensible, cuddly, 
spontaneous WM, 50-65, a gentleman, 
monogamous relationship. Adtf.1349 

CALL AND SEE 

SWPF. 64, seeking SWPM, 60-70. N/S, for 
movies, thoater, dining, conversations, and 
laughing out loud. Add 346 

DANCE WITH ME 

Humorous, outgoing SWF, 63, 5*5", 140lbs., 
brown hair, enjoys dancing, crafts, cooking, 
walking, traveling. ISO SWM, 60-70. 5'8"+, 
N/S, occasional drinker okay, who enjoys 
dancing, tor LTR. Adtf.1 352 

SEED OF FRIENDSHIP 

Outgoing DWF, 37. 5'9\ 135lbs.. blonde 
hair, ISO nice, easygoing, humorous SWM, 
35-45, who enjoys movies, traveling, sports, 
skiing, biking and long walks, for friendship 
first and possible LTR. Adtf. 1354 

SHARE SPECIAL TIMES 

WWF, 58, enjoys outdoors, golf, tennis and 
animals, 6eeks SWM, 50-60, to share spe- 
cial times with and talk to, for friendship. 
Adtf.1316 

" MAKE ME LAUGH 

Outgoing SWF, 47, 5T, reddish-brown hair, 
green eyes, height/weight proportionate, 
enjoys art projects, seeking a tall, intelli- 
gent, financially securo SWM, 43-52, must 

Bo humorous. Ad#. 1326 

GETTOKNOWME 

Petite, caring, loyal, romantic SWF, 68 years 
young. 5'2\ 120lbs., blue-eyed blonde, N/S, 
casual drinker, who enjoys movies, dining 
out, weekend getaways, fairs and cuddling. 
ISO caring, honest SWM, 63-70, 5'IOV, 
who is romantic and enjoys travel. 
Adtf.1330 

ISO A REAL NICE GUY 



Look for Personals every Friday in the Lakeland Newspaper. 



To purchase time on your credit card 

without calling our 900# 

Call 1-800-407-6318 g 

option #4 off the imiin menu' 





JUST BEING TOGETHER 

Easygoing, people person SWF, 53. ST, 
160ID8., brown hair, onjoys fishing, picnics, 
skiing, reading, sooks honost SWM, 53*65, 
for LTR. Adtf. 131 3 

NO COUCH POTATOES 

Slondor, fit, attractive, omotionalry secure 
SWF. 49, 5'9". blond hair, bluo eyes, likes 
juiot evening, dining out. seeks SWM, 50- 
•5, for romance and fun. Adtf.1 31 7 

TAKE A FEW CHANCES 

Self-employed SWF, 42, 5'5', with brown 
hair/oyos, full-figured, lovos camping, read- 
ing, thoatro, opera, boach walks. ISO outgo- 
ing, humorous, intolligent, woll-read SWM, 
35-52. Adtf. 1301 

HERE WITH ME 

Honost, outgoing SWF, 64, 5'2', oyes of bluo, 
brown hair, onjoys movios, dancing, travel- 
ling. ISO D/WWWM, 60-70, who's kind, 
humorous with similar interests. Adtf.1 305 

GORGEOUS 

Funny, sincere, honest WF, 44, 5T, 145lbs., 
golden hair, green oyos, mom, lovos having 
fun, swim, canoeing, volleyball, walking, bik- 
ing, dancing, shooting pool family activities. 
ISO a tall, honost, fit, educated, successful, 

family-oriontod WM, 38-46. Adtf. 1 295 

INNOCENT SMILE 

Easygoing, trusting, humorous, 

emotionally/financially secure, full-figured 
WF, 46, 5'3", Wondish brown hair, greon 
oyos, onjoys reading, cooking, camping, 
movies, music, museums, ISO a SWPM, 35- 
50, N/S, medium to husky build. Adtf.1285 



ILL BE WAITING 

WWWF, 60, 5'4\ 118lbs., short Wond hair, 
blue eyos, educator, onjoys tho outdoors, 
gardening, biking, swimming, cross-country 
skiing, classical music, rooding, theatre, 
spectator sports, travol. ISO a WW/DWM, 58- 

62. N/S, Adtf. 1286 

SERIOUS-MINDED 
Entertaining SBF. S3, with great sense of 
humor, looking for a SM, 45-60, for friendship 
and a ono-on-ono relationship, no mind 
gamos..Ad#.1273 

NOT INTO BAR SCENE 

Very outgoing, fun-loving SWF, 32, 5'4", red 
hair, hazel eyes, loves movies, outdoors, 
reading, shopping, amusemont parks and 
more. Seeking an open, caring SWM. 30-40, 
forjriondship, possible LTR. Adtf.1 269 

JUST 2 B CLOSE 2 U 

Potito, pretty SWPF, 38, N/S, dark hair/oyos, 
looking for WPM, 35-42, kind-hearted, to 
share life. Adtf. 1242 

TOGETHERNESS 

Opon, outgoing, kind SWF. 30, 5*2", 100lbs., 
blond hair, bluo eyes, onjoys dining out, 
movios, music, animals and moro. Seeks fun, 
energetic SWM, 25-52, for a hoalthy relation- 
ship. Adtf. 1258 

READY 2 SETTLE DOWN? 

SWF, 64, 5 '2*. blue-eyed, onjoys movios, 
dancing, reading, long walks and traveling. 
Seeking WW/DWM, 60-70, with a sonso of 
humor, for LTR. Ad#. 1257 





Settdutvour 



Succes s 




W&'cLlov&tohearhouryoU' 
met S0MZOH& through/ the, personals l 

Send us the details: 

Success Stories 

P.O. Box 1571 

Wllliamsville, NY 14231 




SPONTANEOUS 

Honest, patient, sincere, affectionate, loyal 
DWCF, 38, 5'4\ auburn hair, greon oyes, 
onjoys music, movios, traveling, indoor/out- 
door activitios. Looking tor SM, 38-48, with 

samo attributes. Adtf. 1253 

DO U LOVE LIFE? 

Energetic, loving, caring, compassionate, 
patient, understanding, fun, bubbly, sexy 
SWF, 40, 5*4\ 125lbs., brown hair/eyes, 
enjoys outdoors, motorcycles, sports, movies 
and long walks. ISO handsome, fit, kind 
SW/HM, 30-42. for casual dating. Adtf.1 247 

LEAN ON ME 

Outgoing SWF, 47, 5'4\ full-figured, blonde 
hair, interests are plays, movies, theatre and 
any kind of music, looking forward to meet- 
ing a SWM, 45-58, who really onjoys life, for 
friendship. Adtf .5395 

ISO A TRUE GENTLEMAN 

Compassionate SAF, 58, enjoys music, trav- 
eling, reading, dining out, gardening, quiot 
evenings, ISO a kind, loving, gentle SWM, 
55-66, for friendship and possibly more. 

Adtf.5322 

BEAUTIFUL LADY 

SWF, 57, looks 49. 57", N/S, blond, blue 
eyos, who appreciates simple things In life, 
seeking SWM, 45-61, 5'10"+, N/S for a casu- 
al, possible LTR. Adtf . 1236 

w/tk BE FUN AND OUTGOING 

Very energetic and outgoing easygoing, 
romantic SWF, blonde, blue eyes, 68, 5'2", 
120lbs., likes cooking, working out, seeking 
SWF, 60-70, let's enjoy life together. 
Adtf.1227 

customer service 



MANY INTERESTS 
SWF, 45, 5'2", medium built, green eyes, 
enjoys movios, concerts, music, hiking, 
camping, motorcycles and more, seeking 
SWM, 36-49, with same Interests, for LTR. 
Adtf.1205 



ISO NEW ADVENTURES 

SWF, 47, plus-sized, sooks an upbeat, hon- 
est SM, 37-57, who likos fun, camping, fish- 
ing, bowling, billiards and weekond get- 
aways. Adtf. 1220 

HELLO IT'S ME 

Fun, outgoing SWF, 34, 5*5", with brown hair, 
who enjoys the outdoors, hiking, biking and 
more, is looking for a caring SWPM, 30-45, 
for casual dating and like children. Adtf .5389 

CAN YOU PLAY? 

Energetic, funny SW mom, 37, 5'3", 130lbs., 
with wide variety of Interests, Is hoping to 
meet a intelligent SWM, 30-44, to 6pond time 
with. Adtf .5379 



TALL AND ACTIVE 
WF, 55, 5*5", brown hair/eyes, enjoys a gen- 
tle snowfall, slow dancing, the sound of rush- 
ing water. ISO an honest, caring, thoughtful 
WM, 50-60, N/S, tall, active. Ad«.S382 

INDEPENDENT BEAUTY! 

Easygoing, down-to-earth, humorous WF, 29, 
5'8', loves laughter, having fun, theatre, 
reading, good movies, shooting pool, casual 
evenings, ISO humorous, good-hearted, 
down-to-earth, financially/emotionally 

secure, honest, commitment-minded WPM, 

27-35. Adtf .5381 

71 6-634-7849 !& 7 



Bubbly, N/S SWF. 33. blond hair, blue eyes, 
enjoys reading, movies, seeking N/S SWM, 
30-38, for LTR. Adtf.1323 

GIVE ME A CALL 

SWPF, 53, likes dancing, travelling, 
antiques and outdoors. ISO an adventurous 
SWM, 47-57, who lives life to the fullest. 
Ad*1319 



M Male 

F Female 

B Black 

W White 



A Asian 
NA Native 

American 
J Jewish 



C Christian 
S Single 
D Divorced 
WWWldowed 



P Professional 
N/S Non-smoker 
N/D Non-drinker 
H Hispanic 



ISO In search of.., 
LTR Long-term 
relationship 

O Double dater 



I'M HERE FOR YOU 

Easygoing, good listener SWF, 68, S'2 - , 
brown hair/eyes, medium build, enjoys 
movies, garage sales, dining out,' seeks 
SWM, 68-75, for friendship. Adtf.1 284 



This publication b a community, family publication. Anything appearing in Personals must be appropriate lor all ages. 
Participants in Personals must be 18 years or older. Personals Is restricted to individuals seeking personal, monog- 
amous relationships. The publisher reserves the right to edit or reject ads and voice introductions that do not meet 
the standards ol acceptance ol this newspaper. This publication assumes no liability lor the content or reply of a per- 
sonal advertisement. Readers and advertisers may wish to consider taking appropriate safeguards in responding to 
ads and arranging meetings. Callers to the 1-900 system will be charged $2.19 per minute on their monthly phone 
bill. Touchtone phone callers win be given instructions on how to respond to a specific ad, browse male or female 
greetings and use Datematch. For best reception, cordless telephones are not recommended. Use ol this column lor 
business solicitation win be prosecuted. GW/QUFH 04/06/01 



CALL NOW 

Dogrood, easygoing SWPM, 28, 6', 175tt>s., 
onjoys exercising, good conversation, bar 
sports, comedy, choss and reading. Sooking 
proportionate, sweet D/SWF, homebody ok, 
no nigh maintenance. Adtf.1 343 

ALL U NEED 13 LOVE 

And you couldn't possibly get anymoro than 
what this gentlomanry, in-shapo, youthful, 
healthy, educated, honost, sincere WPCM, 
58. has to offerl ISO N/S, in-shapo, hoalthy 
WCF, 45-57. Adtf.1455 

2NDTONONE 

Whon it com os to laughter, fun, good timos 
this educatod, financially socuro SWM, 60, 
likos tho outdoors, concerts, cotfoe and con- 
vocations, takos a backseat to no onel ISO 
attractive F. 40-60. Adtf.1452 




VERY VERSATILE 

Fit WCM, 58,' 6*. 180lbs., light brown 
hair/eyes, lovos nature, quiot evenings, 
videos, the sun, walks ana moro. ISO fit, 
hoalth conscious WCF, 47-57, N/S, who likos 
having fun, the outdoors, for possible LTR. 
Adtf.1441 

GENTLEMAN AS ALWAYS 

WWM, 42, blue eyes. 5'6", I50lbs., father of 
a 5 year-old, enjoys boating, tho zoo, fairs 
and festivals. ISO SF, 2842, for possible 
LTR.Adtf.1439 

YOUNG AT HEART 
SWM, 53, 5*9", 170lbs.. grey hair, enjoys run- 
ning, swimming, dancing, jazz music, quiot 
timos, ISO romantic, fun-loving SWF, 39-56, 
who's honost, with similar Intorosts. 
Adtf.1437 

DONT KEEP WAITING 
SWM, 58, loves gardening, woodworking 
and fishing. ISO an honest, trustworthy SWF. 
48-58, with a sense of humor, for a long-term 
relationship. Adf.1427 

RUOUTTHERE? 

Energetic, easygoing SWM. 35, 5'9\ 
165lbs., brown hair, blue oyos, likos outdoor 
activities, dogs, music and tho arts. ISO 
sociable, famiry-oriontod SF, 25-35. who likes 
children and has good set of morals and val- 
ues. Adtf.1435 

LETS GET TOGETHER 

Outgoing, friondry SWM. 41, ^lO", 165bs., 
blond hair, blue oyos, likes dancing, music, 
golfing, bowling, shooting pool, board 

?amos, card games. ISO SWh 35-45, 5*2"- 
T, 110-140lbs.. with similar interests. 
Adtf.1433 

ANYBODY-N-EVERYBODY 

I get along with. SWM, 52, 5'9". 1B5lbs.. 
muscular-built, employed, funny, likes joking, 
outdoor activities, swimming and home life. 
Sooks affectionate, loving SF. 40-52, fit, for 
LTR.Adtf.1425 

ISO REAL LOVE 

Romantic, honest, spontaneous SWM. 42, 
enjoys outdoors, traveling, boating, fishing, 
festivals, fairs, zoos, reading, biking, movios. 
ISO o happy, fun SF, 30-42, who enjoys kids 
and has similar interosts. LTR posssibie. 
Adtf. 141 9 

TIRED OF BAR SCENES 

SWM, 47, 5'9\ 175lbs., medium-built, brown 
hair/eyes, likes sports, dogs, fishing, bowl- 
ing, movies. ISO a nice, sincere SWr, 33-45. 

Full- figured welcome. Ad #.14 20 

LET'S TALK OVER 

Coffoo? SWM, 60. IBOIbs., dopendent-free, 
educatod, financially secure, with nice homo 
on the lake, onjoys concerts and outdoor 
activitios. Looking for attractive SF. 40-60, for 
companionship and fun timos. Adtf. 141 8 

IN GOD WE TRUST 

Fun SWCPM, 36, ST, I50lbs., seeks a cute 
SWCF, 25-35. who also enjoys movies 
in/out, the outdoors, quality times with quali- 
ty pooplo. Ad#. 1417 

SEEKS GENUINE LADY 

Caring HM, 40, 5'5', 170lbs.. with Integrity 
and sincerity, Into sports, movios, cooking 
and aerobics. Looking for honest, attractive 
WF, 30-40, childless preforred, for dating, 
possibly more. Adtf .1415 

ALL ASPECTS OF UFE 

Handsome SWPM, 49, 6'2", 195lbs.. brown 
hair, blue eyes, looking for a loving, caring, 
sharing, open-minded sF, 30-50, for friend- 
ship, possible LTR. Ad #.141 3 

JUST BE YOURSELF 
Tall, slim SWM, 28, tanned, attractive, mus- 
cular build. Seeking fun-loving, laid-back 
SWF, 21-42, preferably athletic, slim build, 
attractive, for adventurous times. Ad #.1412 

MARRIAGE-MINDED 
Friendly, easygoing SWM, 28. 6*. 230tbs., 
brown hair, hazel eyes, enjoys reading, boat- 
ing, astronomy, seeks petite, honest, caring, 
sincere, -marriage-minded SWF, 21-30. 
Adt.14^0 



2 A SPECIAL LADY 

DWM, 56, 5'0\ 178lbs., N/S. romantic, spon- 
taneous, fun-loving, good-natured. ISO 
D/SWF, 45-58, height/weight proportionate, 
to share outdoor fun, friendship and possible 
LTR. Adtf. 1308 V- 

LOOKING FOR LOVE 

Retired WWWM. 66, seeks woman, who 

loves to kiss and cuddle, age/weight unim- 



n 



COMMITTED TO YOU 

Employed, educated and financially socuro 
SWM, 59, IdOibs., who enjoys a wide variety 
of Interests. Seeks an attractive SF. 40-60, 
for companionship and fun times. Adtf.1 393 



$2.19 per min. 

Mot be 1 8 vn or older 



ISO PREFERRED SWF 

Gontlo, N/S. N/D, handsome, athletic 
SWM, 35, short blond hair, bluo eyos. 
195lbs., emotionally and financially; securo, 
sooks •attractive, active, fit SWF, 26-38. 
Adtf. 1370 

CURTAINS UP 

Actors and Musicians. SWM, 34, brown 
hair, groon eyes, enjoys working out, long 
walks, seeking a swoot, caring sF, 25-40, 
forLTR.Adtf.1365 



CIRCLE THIS AD 

Attractive, honest. SWM. 42, 5"6\ iSOlbs.. 
brown hair, biuo oyes, enjoys outdoors, fes- 
tivals, reading & travel. Seeks a SF, 30-42, 
with similar Interests. Adtf. 1374 

RECENTLY SINGLE 

Good-looking, fit, successful SWM, 43, 
N/S. blond hair, bluo oyes. 5*11". 180tbs., 
onjoys tonnis, golf, movios. fine dining. 
Sooks a kino, outgoing SF, 27-43. 
Adtf.1379 _ _ 

HONEST A TRUSTWORTHY 

Describe this SWM, 18, 5*10", 190lbs., with 
blue oyos, brown hair, enjoys movios, din- 
ing out, sports, sooks onorgetlc, patient, 
understanding, SWF, 18-40. Adtf. 1366 

CHECK IT OUT 

This SW dad of one. 58, 5*9" 170lbs„ with 
brown hair, blue eyos and a beard, enjoys 




all of this with. Ad#.8502 



LOVE AT FIRST SIGKTjB| 

Tall, attractive, loving, compassionato 
SWM, 48, 6'6", blue oyos, silver hair, likes 
Harleys and computer programming. 
Looking for a SF, 35-50, with similar quafi- 
tios/interests. Adtf. 1358 T^ 

BROWSE WITH ME 

Loyal, dependable DWPM, 44, dad, active^ 
onjoys tho groat outdoors, antique shows, 
fairs, walks, long talks, dining out, drives In 
the country, and much moro. ISO SF, 30- 
47.forLTR.Adtf.1348 



GREAT MINDS THINK 

A like, so are you thinking what I'm think- 
ing? That this stocky, eclectic WM, 30, likos 
sports, concerts, movies, bowling, billards 
and a non-smoking, unoncumborod WF, 
22-397 Call soon! Adtf.1342 

PRECIOUS MOMENTS 

Get ready for memories in tho making wil 
this honest, romantic, spontaneous, family 
orionted WWWM. 42. likes the outdoors, 
boating, fishing, festivals, fairs, swimming. 
ISO arappy, Tun, fa miry-oriented WF, 30- 

42.Adtf.1345 - 

LETS CUDDLE 

Easygoing, handsome SWM, 40, 6'2\ 
165 lbs., dark blond hair, biuo eyes, enjoys 
biking, garage sales, bowling, movios and 
music. Would like to moot a good-looking. 
honest SF, 28-50. who has a good sense of 
humor, for LTR. Adtf. 121 9 

GOOD TIMES AHEAD 

SWM. 40. 5'9". I55lbs.. with brown hair, 
blue eyes, likes tho outdoors, theater. 
movios, dancing, live music, cooking and 
moro. ISO SF, 30-45. N/S. with simRarlntor- 
ests and some of her own. Adtf. 1325 

GIVErTATRY 

Active, loyal, dependable DWP father of 
two, 44, likes the outdoors, sporting events, 
antique shows, talking, walks travol. dining 
out. music and more. ISO SF. 32-46, with 
similar interests. Adtf. 1322 

PLUS SIZE WANTED 

Outgoing SWM, 35, S'U', 180fos., with 
black hair who enjoys bowling. 
hockey/baseball games, collecting sports 
cards and model trains. ISO full-figured 
SHF, 30-45. who has similar interests. 
Adtf.1329 

SHARE A LAUGH 
With this spontaneous SWM. 38, 6*. 
240(b3.. with brown hair/eyes and a nice 
smilo. Ukes boating, nature, walks and 
scuba diving. ISO SWF, 32-41, who has a 
love for life and appreciates the smaller 
things in life. Adtf. 




CAN WE MEET? 

Attractive, funny, romantic SWM, 24. 6*2". 
195lbs., with medium build, brown hair and 
deep blue eyes, who enjoys hiking, camp- 
ing, quiot times at home, romantic dinnors. 
ISO a SWF. 18-26, up to 5'6" and slender, 
with a great personality. Adtf .1 337 

LOOKIN'GOOD 

Outgoing, talkative SWM, 44, 5'8", 185bs.. 
stocky build, with brown hair and hazel 
eyes, who enjoys teaching, traveling, car 
shows, summer months, dining in/out ISO 
an honost SWF, 25-50. height/weight pro- 
portionate, for commlttea relationship. 
Adtf.1333 

WHAT DO YOU LIKE? 

Shy SWM, 45, ST. ISOlbs., who enjoys 
bike riding, walks, movies, museums and 
the zoo. Looking to settle down with an 
honest, caring, fun-loving SF, 30-46. 
Adtf.1332 

R U THE LUCKY LADY? 

Who will call this SWM, SO, who Ukes clas- 
sic cars, casino, watching movies, fireside 
cuddling, moonlit walks and dining out, ISO 
a S lady, 25-50, race 
Adtf.1341 



unimportant. 



THE BEST OFTIMES 

DWM, N/S, 6'2". 208lbs.. silver blond hair, 
blue eyes, enjoys life and art. ISO slender 
WF, 39-61, who loves life, to share my 
world, for friendship, monogamous rela- 
tionship. Adtf .5377 

GIVE ME A CALL 

DWM, 56. 5'8', brown hair/eyes, slightly 
overweight, enjoys music, plays, home lilo 
and travel. ISO D/SWF, 46-66. for friend- 
ship, companionship, monogamous rela 
tlonshlp.Adtf.1172 


























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** "'*" ' — — «*-■ " " »'»■ . * . ' ." ''■■ " 






wawm 







April 13, 2001 ' 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Lakeland Newspapers L f-f 2.9 



n 




MEDIA 






WISCONSIN 



Kenosha County 



Anlioch 



LakoCounty 



NEWSPAPERS 



Sprint Cr o%* 



131 









HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD 



LmitcnhitfM 



W.ulSMonli 



UWc 



Ubr V.il.i 



Gil" . i 



i : i ; i ; ; 



CalL 847.223.816! 



ByToc 847.223.2691 

By Malt Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 
In Person: 30 S. Whitney St, 

Grayslake 



it 

loRoddonJ 



Mc Henry 



Mchenry 
County 



132 



IrtKletidr 



120 



Gf.i>sl.ikr 



Hound Like A/rJ 



137 






W.I t KOMI J. 1 




Libcr1yv»nc 



Ittaftd LiWr 



dead: 



W\ K 



I *"" 



Mundclrin 



Direct line. 



Mon. 5pm 



Classified (Business & Priva te PartyUVecLlOani 

HOURS 

8am-5pm 



Mon--Frl 



CookCounty 



Ad appears in 11 Lakeland Newspapers! 



AntiochNews • Round Lake News 
Lake Villa Record • Mundelein News 
Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press 
Lindenliurst News • Wauconda Leader 

Libertyville News 



ti 



fk 



MMUr** 




Notices 



Notices 




Notices 




Lost & Found 




Personals 



Ym 



on Friday fc* lb« 



rrw»t of m arror. UtoUnd N.wtp apw wlfl b. 
tar only tte Ant Income* loMtiloa sad oaty 

portloa oftb. mdOiMt to tn m« or rrodwd umI<m. 
conuct lb. (UmUJmJ Ifepartm** ImntedUler/ •» 

Of WTO*. 




ARE YOU A SINGLE 

PARENT? 

Parents without Partners 

is a not-for-profit 

organization devoted to 

the interest and welfare 

of the single parent and 

their children. 

PWP members plan 

educational, support, and 

social activities for 
children and adults on a 
monthly basis. For more 
Information on hew you 
can become a member* 
please call our hotline 

(847)817-5687. 




NOTICE 




GARDENS 

mvoLO 

66666666666 
HAD A FIRE, 

BUT WERE 



STOP1 DONT PAY MOREI 
5.9C MINUTE ANYTIME 

State/state long distance 
calling without restrictions. 
Inside Illinois 3.5c/7.5i. 
Your own 800 number no 
charge. UNBEATABLE LEM- 
TELECOM 877-99HELLO- 
877-994-3558. 



FOUND MONDAY 4/2 on 

Wadsworth Rd.. white, male 
Poodle. Call Lake County 
Humane Society. (847) 949- 
9925. 



A BABY TO ADORE I 






ATTENTION 

Farmers Market vendors. 

The Village of Richmond 

will be sponsoring a Friday 

Farmers MarkeL The 

market will be scheduled to 

run every Friday starting • 

June 1 5th until October 

26th . The hours win be 

3pm until 7pm. For more 

information or a packet to 

be mailed please Can the 

Village of Richmond at 

(815)678-4040 



Business 
As Usual 

Volo 
(815) 344-9000 

Richmond 
(815) 678-7200 



fAMTED HAIR? 
Try Electrolysis 

(permanent hair removal). 

New location: 

626 N. Barron (Ri. 83). 

FREE Consultation 

& Brochure. 

Grayslako 

(847) 249-7446. 

$5,00 OFF WITH AD. 



DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Can Lakoland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



Stay-at-home mom, 

professional dad, cozy home 

in country-like suburb, 

lots of cousins/playmates 

and loads of advantages 

await your newborn. 
We'll help in any way we 

can! 

CALL DOREEN & WAYNE 
1-8SS-299-6241 toll froo. 





Free 



FREE PICK UP SERVICE. I 
win haul away your unwant- 
ed row boat, canoe, outboard 
motor FREE. Cal (847) 973- 
7388, please leave message 
if no answer.. 



A BEAUTIFUL GIFT: Loving 
enthusiastic couple (teacher 
& doctor) have much to offer 
a child; charming suburban 
home on tree-lined street, 
loads of relatives nearby, ter- 
rific schools, parks and our 
unending devotion. We're 
here to help you. JOAN & 
DON at home 1-888-922- 
9724. 




Notices 





PARENTS WITHOUT 

PARTNERS 

& 

SOLO SINGLES 

Will be having 

2 Super Dances, 

Saturday March 3rd. 

& April 28th., 8pm. 

Dress up attire. 

BelUnTs, \ 
Rte. 21 & 137, 

Libertyville. 

Hotline (847) 5734)571. 



DING 
ENGAGEMENT 
ANNIVERSARY 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

To announce a wedding, 

engagement or anniversary, 

can (847) 223-8161. There is 

a short form to fin out and 

return. Forms can be mailed 

or faxed to you. Photos are 

welcome. Fees are listed on 

the forms. Mailing address: 

Lakeland Media, 

30 S. Whitney St.. . 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Attn: Bridal Sec. 

Phone number or questions: 

Call Nancy Thielsen 

(847)223-8161. 

ext. 143. 




ARE YOU SPRING C 
ING77 GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
■ CHARGE! (We discourage 

any pet ads). Deadlines: 1 0am 

Wednesdays. MB (847) 
223-8161. exL140. 




Personals 



Notices 




_ 4 I - - 



.••••* 



PUBLIC NOTICE, NOTICE OF FILING 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS GAS COMPANY d/b/a 
NICOR GAS COMPANY hereby gives notice to the public 
that it has filed with the Illinois Commerce Commission 
on March 30, 2001, testimony and exhibits for Docket No. 
00-0718 setting forth a reconciliation of the Company's Gas 
Supply Cost revenues with actual gas costs for 2000. 

Further information with respect thereto may be 
obtained either directly from this Company or by addressing 
the Chief Clerk of the Illinois Commerce Commission at 
Springfield, Illinois 62706. 

A copy of this filing may be inspected by an interested 
party at any business office of this Company. 




Northern Illinois Gas Company d/b/a Nicor Gas Company 

- G. Behrcns, Vice President 




If I 



TO WOMEN 

tttto are healthy to be anony- 
mous egg donors. Chicago's 

first and most highfy respected 
program is looking for women 
between the ages 21-31. 
Donors wiB be evaluated, take 

moocaoon ana uooergo a rmoor 
surgical procedure. . 
Serious inquiries only. 

Call AflH 773-327-7315 



CHILDLESS COUPLE 

WANTS TO an 

ADOPT A BABY!! 

Pre -School teacher and 
sports loving executive 1 
husband married for over! 
11 years are anxious to 
hold the lilies of •mom* 
and 'dad*. Your precious' 
baby will be showered 
with love & many fulfilling 
lifetime opportunities. We 

admire your decision for, 
choosing life & would feei 
honored if chosen to carry 
on your dreams for your 
baby. Medical, legal,) 
counseling and court ap- 
proved living expenses! 
paid. Information confl 
dential. Please call our 
|attomey at 888-3 1M 556 





A BABY TO ADORE 
ADOPTION 
A wonderful future.. .filled 
with love, opportunity and 
fun...awaits your baby. We 
enjoy our home on a tree- 
lined street, weekend geta- 
ways at the family cottage 
and our large and lively ex- 
tended family. Mike is a suc- 
cessful business owner and 
Laurie, a registered nurse, 
will be home with baby. 

LAURIE AND MIKE 
ToOfreet -888-333-1 177. . 



WEIGHT LOSS 
- SAMPLES*. 

WeVe lost 40tbs, 

cain-800-: 

WWW.I 



GET SKINNY BY SPRINGI 

SEXY BY SUMMER! 

Lose up to 30ibs. FAST. 

www.diet4u.net 

code: 10406. 

Or phone: (847)973-9297. 





' ATTENTION 
PET OWNERS 
WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 

ACCEPT ADS FOR 

ANIMALS IN OUR FREE/ 

GIVE AWAY COLUMN. 

If you must give up your 
pet, please consider these 

facts. 

'Free animal ads suggest 

that there is something 
wrong with the animal, or 

that it has no value. 
'Some people who re- 
spond to. these free animal 

ads are not reputable and 
are more concerned about 
making a profit than the 

animal. 

•Charging a fee to a poten- 
tial pet owner confirms the 
responsibility of pet owner- 
ship for an entire lifetime 
of that pet. For more Infor- 



To Place An 
Ad With 




Call (847) 223-816! 
orFax(847)223-269l 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



THERE IS SOMETHING 
MISSING IN OUR LIVES 

Loving couple wish to adopt 
your child. We offer a home 

filled with love, laughter, 
warmth & security. Let's talk- 
Together we can provide a 
bright future for your baby 

Evanne & Mlchaol 
1-800-789-7690. 



ABSOLUTE AUCTIONS - 

Golf course, residential, com- 
mercial lots. Greenville, Al. 
near Robert Trent Jones 
course. I-65. exit 1 30., May 5. 
10am. Brochure 1-800-996- 

Zw7# t 

www.gtauctions.com. 
Granger, Thagard & Asso- 
ciates, Inc. Jack F. Granger 
#873. 



' 



■Hofou&cxy 2>v\*v 



a.'i.ii 





Financial 



Lakeland's Classified 
Deadline is 



1 200 ?M. Wednesday 

Calk (847) 223-8 1 61 or 
Fax: (847) 223-2691 



■ 






NOW HIRINQ FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: 



• Experienced breakfast cook 

• P.M. Kitchen Supervisor FT/PT 

• Restaurant Servers FT/PI' 

• Cashiers FT/PT • Hostess FT/PT 

• Banquet Servers • Bartenders P/T 
Holiday Inn offers medical and dental packages, 
paid vacations and more! 



6161 W. 



HOUDAY INN GURNEE 

W. Grand Avenue, Gurnee, IL 6003 1 



I!^™'^^ 000 ^ ^ I .,..■„„.. ..... ^^. Apply in penononfy. 



500FASTCASH.COM-SHORT 
TERM LOANS up to $500,001 

We want your business. To 
apply: 1-888-990-2274 Loans 

by County Bank, Rehoboth 
Beach, DE (FDIC), Equal Op- 
portunity Lender. 



\v 




BE DEBT FREE. Years 
Sooner! . Low Payments! Re- 
duced Interest! Stop late 
feesl Stop Collectors! FAMI- 
LY CREDIT COUNSELING. 
Non-Profit Christian Agency. 

^ . _ J FEE QUOTE www.farnllycrec~ 
/f it.org RECORDED MES- 
^f. .. . SAGE 1-800-729-7964. * - 














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B30 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIEDS 



April 13, 2001 





Over 300 




Readers Each Week 




MEDIA 





Help Warned 
Part-Time 



WE BUY STRUCTURED Set- 
tlements, insurance, annul' 
ties, lottery & casino Jack< 
pot winnings. Call PPI 800' 
435-3248 ext. 17. www.ppl 

cash.com 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



WORK AT HOME 

$500-$ 1000 PfT at home 
stuffing onvelopes Send self 
addressed stamped envel- 
ope to Klrktand Assoc, PO 
Box 8221, Waukogan, IL. 

60079 

I 



CASHIER 

GENERAL OFFICE 

Wa havo 2 permanent, 
PfT positions available; 

Hours: 

10 am to 2 pm Mon.-Fri. 

2 to 6 4 days/week and 

8:30 am to 5 pm Sat. 

Dutlos Include: 

Sorvico cashlor.filing and 

reception. Call Dob or 

Mary Lou forappt. 

PAULY HONDA 

UBERTYVULE 
847-362-4300 



LAUNDROMAT ATTENDANTS 

Permanent Part-Timo positions for reliable, friendly, 
mature persons to handlo a variety of duties serving 
customers in a clean, modorn, friendly environment. 

Apply in porson at: 

DRY DOCK LAUNDROMAT 

509 WASHINGTON ST. 

INGLESIDE, ILLINOIS 

(847) 587-5445 

(Behind Dog & Suds) 



DRIVER 

LAKELAND MEDIA is looking for an extremely reliable 
and dependable person to handlo our trucking and de- 
livering needs. All driving is local. Must be able to work 
early morning shifts and be in good physical condition. A 
CDL is necessary, and we will offer asststamce in obtain- 
ing one. Please call and ask for Hob Schrocder at 

(847) 223-8161 



Save-A-Pet animal adoption center 

seeks the following:. 

Veterinary tech / experienced animal health professional. 

Call Brigitto 847-740-7788 ext. 110. 

Part-tlmo konnot / animal care worker. 

Call Cindy W. 847-740-7788 oxl. 107. 

Administrative assistant / full time. Experienced, flexible, 

easy-going, able to work independently. Call A/leno at 

B47-740-7788ex1.102. 

Flexible hours. Must bo 18 or older. Resumes accepted at 
847~740'7796. Come join the caring team at Savo-A-Pot 



•/.* 



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Lakeland Classifieds 
are the place to turn 
Iwhen businesses have 
job vacancies to fill. 
No one reaches the 
local market like the 
11 Lakeland 

» 

Newspapers, Market 
Journal and Great 

Lakes Bulletin. More 

than 300,000 readers 
in the Lake County 

Area, read our papers 
• every week. 

Classified 
223-8161 





Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




FOOD SERVICE 

PT Banquet Waits taff] 
Person/ Server for uni- 
versity / conference 
center In Mutidelcin. 
Work 15*20 hours per 
week between 3:30 
p.m. and 7:30 pan 
Great environment! 

Competitive pnyl To 
find out more, contact 
tile Food Service Man 

ngcr nt (847) 970-4820. 
UOUM/P/D/V 



GENERAL 
OFFICE 

PfT EVENING 

4PM/9PM 

Duties Includo cashier, 

filing & phonos. Must bo 

able to work in a fast 

paced environment. 

Apply at: 

ROCKENBACM CHEVROLET 
lOOOE.tkMdmnd. 

Or»y*4*k«.. IWiwt* MOM 



PART-TIME 
HELP WANTED 

Northbrook Sports Club, 

In Hainesville needs 

dependable cashier for, 

part-time employment, 

no experience required, 

will train. Work Wed., 

Thurs., Sat., and Sun. 

Starting pay $8.50 per hr. 

Call Mike at; 

847-223-5700 



GENERAL OFFICE 
1*2 daya/wk, $12/hr. 

Li. typlng/dataontry/tiling 

Must bo detail oriented 

with computer skills. 

Fox take 847-587-8413 



HOMEWORKERS 
NEEDED 

$635 weekly 
processing mall. Easy! 
No experience needed. 
Call 1-800-G52-B726 

Ext 2020 24 Hrs. 



CLIENT SERVICES DIRECTOR 

Candidate must havo Social Services Background in a 

skilled Nursing Facility and have the desire to manage 

Social Sorvico and Activity Personnol on Modlcaro floor. 

The candidate has the opportunity to develop marketing 

skills and work with Hospital Discharge Planner. Please 

call, fax/mail or apply to: 

SUZANNE KJNSEY 
LEXINGTON HEALTH CARE CENTER OF LAKE ZURICH 

gOO S. RAND ROAD 

LAKE ZURICH, ILLINOIS 60047 

PH: (S47) 726*1200 FAX: (647)726.1263 



RESIDENT SUPPORT SERVICE 

REPRESENTATIVE 

Aro you looking for a job experience to further your career in 
the field of psychology or social work? Do you enjoy 
working with people? We have an entry tevel PfT position 

availabte in our RESIDENT SUPPORT SERVICE DEFT. 
II interested, please call, fax/mall resume or apply to : 

Suzanne Klnsoy 
Lexington Health Core Center of Lake Zurich 

000 S. Rand Rd. 

Lako Zurich, IL 60047 

PH: (847) 728*1200 Fax: (847) 726-1265 



-y 



1 



«IIUl 



pV*> SA *>* 




$8.30/hr 



PLUS 

OAnnual bonuses and paid holidays & vacations 
OVarious shifts & hours with paid training 

ONo weekend or holiday hours required 
OMedical/ Dental Be Life insurance 
OBring your kids to work opu'on 
OEmpToyee shuttle 

First Student** 



Call Today! 
847-244*1066- 



Oppau**" 







IF YOU MUST WORK- 
WORK AT HOME. 

BuiW your own succowful 
business .Mail Ofdof/E«Com. 

*500-$150O/mo, PfT. J2O00- 

$7000/moFn". FfM Booklot: 
wv/w. DreamsRfoat.com 

BOO'790-822*J 



NURSES/ 
RN/LPN 

PfT Night Shift In Cory, 

Grayslako.Waukegan, 

Round Lako Beach 

CALL 

AMERICAN HOME 
HEALTH 

1-800-872-4427 




Looking for someone who 
has outstanding office skills. 
Computor experience, typ- 
ing skills and good phone 
etiquette a must. Customer 
servico important. Call 566* 
3040 for an appointment. 



SECRETARY/ 

RECEPTIONIST 

Looking for someone who 
has outstanding offico 
skitis. Computer experi* 

once a must, and good 
phono otiquotto. Woekend 
and ovenings. Call 566- 
3040 for an appiontmont. 



TELEPHONE WORK 
FROM HOME 

Need Money??? 

No selling involved, 

Homemakers & Retirees 

encouraged to apply. 

Dependability required. 

(815)344-8037. 



Rom 

PART-TIME 

Phono solicitina for 

pickups of clothing 

and household items. 

Woll known organization, 

Please call - 

630-515-5752 




1000 A 
WEEK! 

Our marketing and promo 

firm is expeh«nceing an 

overload of work. We need 

several people NOWI 

PT/FT No exp. nee. Will 

train. 

(847) 705-3487. 



$40K TO S60K Yr. Poten- 
tiallll Data entry: We need 

claim processors now. No 
experience needed. Will 
train. Computer required. 1- 

888-314*1033 Dept. 400. 
S505/WK. WORKING WITH 

the government from home. 
Part-timo/Tull-tlme. 1-888-745* 
01B8Exl.A3{24hrs.). 

AVON LOOKING FOR higher 
income?. More liexible 
hours? Independence? 

AVON has what you're look- 
ing for. Let's talk.. (888) 561- 
2966. No upfront fee. 




NEWSPAPERS 




- 4...T 



Take Off . . . on an exciting adventure! 



Greater Milwaukee 

AVIATION CAREER FAIR 



! • r . 



General Mitchell International Airport 

SPEAKERS / EXHIBITORS / AIRCRAFT TOURS 

Arc you looking for a career Hut will soar your way right to ihc lop? Then don't miss this opportuni- 
ty to learn more about the many exciting career* In aviation. Here's your dunce to talk to pilots, flight 
attendants, airline managers, travel agents, air i raffle controllers, aircraft mechanics, military aviation 
personnel, and many otljcrs.Oet answers to your questions about education and training. the current 
and future |ob nurkct, saury, and the advantages and dlsadvanuges of different aviation careers. 

(Aircraft toura on Friday, April 27th only) 



.» «■ 



* :* 



— ■• 



*;** 



,'.' 



* * 



EVERY HALF-HOUR, THE FOLLOWING TOPICS WILL BE 
FEATURED IN ONE OF THREE CONFERENCE ROOMS. 

Illol/rravcl Agent/Flight Attendant/Military Aviation/Aircraft Mechanics/ Air freight Industry/ 

Aeronautical Engineering/Overview of Aviation Careers/Electronics/ Avion Ics/Conipul ers/A I r Traffic 

Control/Navigational Equipment/Airline Management/Ticket Agent/Gn>und Crew 

For more Information, call (414) 747-5316 



FREE ADMISSION & PARKING. 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



• FITNESS * 

Need five motivated and 
outgoing Individuals to 
run new Gurncc compa- 
ny. High Income. Port 
time/full time. Will 

train. Ph. 847-22 1-5054 



•NEW STARTING PAY scale 
•Paid orientation •Earning 
potontlal up to $50,000 per 
year 'Full, benefits 'Now 
model conventional tractors 
•Quality homo llmo 'Region- 
al & OTR drivers needed NO 

STUDENTS PLEASE. Call 
ARCTIC EXPRESS 800-927* 

0431 www.arctlcox- 

press.com P.O. Box 129, Mil- 
liard, OH. 48026. 



2 Port/ Full Time 

TEACHERS & 

TEACHER'S ASSTs 

For growing Wauconda 
day care. Mon-Frl. 
(Flexible hrs PT). In- 
surance benefits avail. 

fered. Call Ren or Donna 
to interview. 

(847) 487-5437 

TURTLE EXPRESS 

DAYCARE 



V 



ACTIVITY 

ASSISTANT/ AIDES 
Needed in a LT.C. Facili- 
ty. Must bo outgoing and 
creative and able to work 
[with minimal supervision. 
F/T positions available. 
Competitive salary and 
.benefits. Please call, fax 
'or mail resumo or apply to: 

CAROL FUTTERMAN, 
ACTIVITIES DiR. 

LH.C.C.OF LAKE ZURICH 

COOS. RAND RD. 

LAKE ZURICH.IL 00047 

PH: 847*72* 1200 

FX.M7-726.12M 



AMERICA'S AIR FORCE 
Jobs available in over 150 
specialties, plus: *Up to' 
$17,000 enlistment bonus 
•Up to $10,000 student loan 
repayment 'Prior Service 
Openings High School grads 
age 17*27 or prior service 
members from any branch. 
Call 1-800-423-USAF ro re- 
quest additional information 
or visit www.airforce.com 

ARE YOU CONNECTED? IN- 
TERNET USERS WANTEDl 
$25-$75/HR*PT/FT. 



litt* 



■Vill 



(SCA Network) 



AREA REPS WANTED ISE 

provides training, travel op- 
portunities & part-tlmo In- 
come for placement, super- 
vision of exchange students 
& house families. Please 
call Jayme 1-800-29 1-6508. 



ASSEMBLY 
SERVICE TECH 

Great pay & benefits. 
Advancement Opportu- 
nities. No Exp. Nee. 

Toll Free 
1-877-250*4791 



ATTENTION 

WORK FROM 

ANY LOCATION 

$500-$2,500/mo PT 

$3,0000$7,000/mo FT 

FREE Booklet 

www.yourdfeAmtofrtwdom.com' 

C«U 1-888-717*8481 




Help Wanted 
Full -Time 



ATTENTION: BE YOUR OWN 

BOSS, WORK FROM HOME, 
International company ex- 
panding, earn up to $1500* 
$7000/mo. PT/FT. Many posi- 
tions available. 1-600*878- 
9026. 




Automotive 

^E LP WANTED* 

'Assistant Managers 
•Automotive 
Technicians 

Join our team «i various Lake 
& Cook County area 
locations! Prior e*peri«nce . 
and AS E certification is a ■ 

plus. Call of tax your 
resumed** of interest to 

S47.29S-0228 
or 600-830*7705. 

CAR-X 

Auto Service 

An Equal 
Opportunity Employer. 



} 



BUSINESS LIAISON/ 
APPLIED ARTS 

. DEPARTMENT 

Stevenson High School, 

IL seeks 

candidate with ability to 

establish posJbve working 

relationships between area 

businesses and Stevenson 

H*gh School District t25. 

This ptttn*r:»l>ip fchoufd 

result in enhanced 

curriculum relevance for 

students, improved service 

to area businesses and 

business invorvement in 

the District Knowledge of - 

computer word processing, 

data base marketing, 

spreadsheets, etc 

P/eaee fax mum* to 

Personnel 

Stevenson HS, 

847-634-0230, 



Qualified 

PRE-SCHOOL 
TEACHER 

CALVARY 

CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 
Call (847) 350-8106 

or **\d mum* to: 
134 McnaWle Rd., 

Lake Villa, IL 60045 
Fa*: (S47) 355-5524, 



7 



CAREER OPPORTUNITY! 
EARN excellent income pro- 
cessing medical claims for 
local doctors. Full training & 
support provided. Home com- 
putor required. Call Physi- 
cian & Healthcare Develop- 
ments toll free 1*800-772- 
5933 ext. 2072. 



CHARTWELLS 
NOW HIRING 

Full/Part Tlmo 1 

•FOOD SERVICE 

WORKERS 

•CASHIERS 

Excellent Hoursl 

Great Pay! 
Call 847-270*9317 



Clerical 

.DATA ENTRY 

Entry Level 

but not for longl 

Small, friendly, and pro- 
fessional Ubertyvilte 
CPA firm Is looking to 
train an individual with 
good 10 key skills. We 
provide: 401 K and profit 
sharing plan; flex time is 
available. 

Please call/fax resume: 
Ph (847) 247-1040 
Fx: (847) 367-1026 



EARN A 2ND Income without 
a 2nd job. Work from home. 

$500*$4000+mo. PT/FT. 1- 
688*321-6953. 




Do you enjoy variety7 Do you enjoy a challenge? 

Do vou thrive in a fast paced, dynamic environment? 

[f so. you could be the person we're looking fori 

Lakeland Media Is looTung for someone to join our 

exciting Sales Department Part-Time. You will be a 

success if you possess organizational and 

communication skills and are self motivated 

Mother and college hours available. 

to find out mori about this exciting opportunity, 
Caul Bob Sch Boeder At Lakeland Media: 

Phone: (847)223-8161 

Fax: (847) 223-2691 

* 

or send rosume to: P.O. Box 410 • Groyslako, IL 60030 

. Attn: Bob Schrocder 

■ •'■ .1 % t «t y, . * • m 



% 



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4 



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f. 



fct*. 



' ^ * 




3, 2001 




-» »* 





■|V 






pril 13,200 



% > » 



CLASSIFIEDS 



♦ • • 



Lakeland Newspapers I B31 





Over 300,000 Readers Each W 





MEDIA 




lUdWgJ^^LTDl 




NEWSPAPERS 




Help Wanted 
Full -Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 

Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 






Help Wanted 
FuII-tfmc 



UROWN 

h HOME, 

any ox- 

) $1500- 

iny posi- 

300-678- 



COLLECTION EXCELLENT 

INCOMEI Collecting local- 
past-duo sect's. Training pro- 
vided. Computer roq'd. 
FT/PT.. 1-800-307-3987 ext. 

40 





ie pro- 
ms for 
Inlng & 

ie com- 

Physl- 

evelop- 

JO-772- 







ongl 
pro- 
-ville 
g to 
with 
We 
)rofit 
ie is 



vithout 
home. 
T. 1. 





in* 






)030 



• 



insTRumtnT OPERATOR 

Land survey firm seeks 
Crew Chief & Instrument 
Operator. Experience in 
boundary, topographical, 
construction staking, data 
collection. Benefits: 

Health. 401 K. 

;BBSI:NI> RESUME: 

R.E. ALLEN & 
ASSOCIATES 

31 S. SlusserSt., 
Gray slake, I L 60030 

or FAX (847) 223-0980 

DATA ENTRY WE need 
claim processors nowl No 
exp. noodod. Will train. PC 
required. Up to $5K/mo. BBB 
1-800-240-1 548, Oept. 800 

www.epsmed.net 



DENTAL 
ASSISTANT 

Modern Curncc Dental 
Practice seeks front office 
Receptionist/ Assistant. Top 
pay with benefits, no week- 
lends, experience preferred. 

HCall (847) 855-8228 



optician mm 

Full time position avail- 
able in our northern Illinois 
Ophthalmology/Optometry 
practice. Optical experi- 
ence desired. Certification 
not required. Competitive 
salary and benefits includ- 
ing medical/dental and 
401Kplan. 

Call Janice at 

(847) 244-1 657 X26 or fax 

resume to. 

(847)244-6122 



DRIVER - COVENAN 
TRANSPORT. NO CDL • NO 
PROBLEM. 1-800-842-0853. 

Toams Start. .42 cents • .48 
cents. $1,000 Sign-On 
Bonus for Exp. Co. Drivers 1- 
800-441-4394. Owner Opera- 
tors 1-877-848-6615. Gradu- 
ate Students 1-800-338-6428. 

DRIVER-INEXPERIENCED7 
LEARN TO BE AN OTR PRO- 
FESSIONAL FROM A TOP 
CARRIER. GREAT PAY, EX- 
ECUTIVE STYLE BENEFITS 
AND ^CONVENTIONAL 
EQUIPMENT. CALL TODAYI 
U.S. XPRESS 688-038-3338. 





RS 00% SAME DAY 

RELOAD. Late model KW 
tractors, great miles, 09% no 
touch freight- Must have 19 
mos. OTR experience with 
dean MVR. 1-800-201-4782. 



EXPERIENCED 
PROCESSOR 

heeded in FHA and con- 
ventional loans. Call Karen 
Koup 847-549-7100. Equal 
Opportunity Lender. 



DRIVER • COMPANY drivers 

and owner operators. Call 
today and ask about our 
great new compensation and 
bonus packages. Boyd Bros. 
800-543-8923 COO'S call 800- 
633-1377). EOE. 

DRIVER/REGIONAL UP TO 

38c. Home weekly. Great 
benefits. 401 K. condos, 
$10,000 bonus. EOE. CDUA. 
Contact KLLM 800-925-5556 

or KLLM.com 



DRIVERS & OWNER opera 
tors wanted for various runs. 
CDL training available. Tui- 
tion reimbursement up to 

$5,000. SWIFT TRANSPOR- 
TATION www.swifttrans.com 
(eoe, m/f) 1 -800-284-8785. 



DRIVERS - CFI HIRING OTR 
DRIVERS. Company/stud- 
ent/owner opoerators. Com- 
pany with one year experi- 
ence starts 32 cents per 
mile. 0/0 starts 80 cents - ail 
miles plus fuel surcharge. 
For more information call 1- 
eoO-CFl-DRIVE. 



. 



WAREHOUSE/PACKAGE 
HANDLER 

•2nd and 3rd shift 
•Full & Part time 

'Must pass security daaranct* 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

PHONE REP 
•Data Entry skills required. 

•Customer service skills a 
Apply in person at 

TRANSPORTATION 

S0LUn0N3l_ 

3059 W. WASHINGTON ST. 
WAUKEQAN, IL 600*5 



' 








■— - 



FLEXOGRAPHIC 

PRINTING PRESS 
OPERATOR 



MIn. 1 yr experience 
Wide Web experience helpful 
Flexible hours necessary ' 
Excellent pay and benefits 

Fax resume to John 
@ (847) 356-8630 or call for 

appointment with John or Larry at 

(847) 356-2323 




DRIVERS - EXPERIENCED 

drivers start at 34cftnL Top 
pay-40c/mi. Dedicated oppor- 
tunities. Lease program 
now/usod. M.S. Carriers 1- 

800-231-5209 EOE 



DRIVERS NEEDEDI OFFER 

full benefits & guaranteed 
home time. Veteran drivers 
start .32 com for flatbed & 
.31 com for van. Call SMITH- 
WAY MOTOR XPRESS. 1- 
800-247-8040. 

www.smxc.com 

DRIVERS-DRIVE TO OWN. 
NO CREDIT CHECKS, NO $$ 
DOWN. $.81 cents ♦ per 
mile. Late model convention- 
als, frequent home time, 
$900 + weekly. Call Jotliif at 
1 -800-885-4479. 

EARN UP TO $2,200 Month- 
ly, PT/FT. No Exp. Work from 
home. HUD/FHA Program 1- 
888-769-1994 Code S1 3. 



DRIVERS/OTR - STAR Trans- 
port, Inc., Has An Exciting 
New Pay Package. Experi- 
enced Drivers Can Start Up 
To 34 cents Per Mile, Full 
Company Benefits, Excel- 
lent Home Time, Great Miles. 
Must Have Class A CDL & 
Be Able To Pass DOT Physi- 
cal and Drug Screen. Train- 
ing Available! 600-548-6082. 
Ext. 805. 

DRIVERS: NORTH AMERI- 
CAN VAN UNES has open- 
ings in Logistics. Reloca- 
tion, Blanketwrap and 
Flatbed fleets. Minimum 3 
months OTR experience re- 
quired. Tractor purchase 
available. Call 1-800-348- 
2147. Dept ILS. 

EARN $25,000-$50,000/YR. 
MEDICAL Insurance Billing 
Assistance Needed Imme- 
diately! Use your Home Com- 
puter for great potential an- 
nual income. Call nowl 1-600- 
291-4883 ext 407 (SCA Net- 
work) 



Needed Immediately - 

Electronic Printer 

Operators 

w/acrountaUlity work hUlory 

Multiple openings. 

Call today. 

For interview Sandra 
or Cassie 

@ 847/816-8707 

Rceutnc if available 

FAX (847) 566-2116 




EXPERIENCED, 

DEPENDABLE TREE 

CUMBERS, WITH 

VALID D.L GOOD 

PAY, INSURANCE & 

BENEFITS. CALL 

847-566-0372 




Engineer/ 

■ — 



Technician 



Opening 




Corporate cafeteria in 
Waukegan seeks team 
player with experience in 
c ash c ring, cooking/ food 
preparation, sanitation. & 
customer service. Hours 
are Mon-FrL days. Excel 
lent pay with benefits, 
Call Chef Victoria, 




(847) 473-5! 
Ext. 079 



II 



*rw f 



Ml-« 








> QURNEE 

• Front Desk Clerks 









NOW HIRING 

FOR THE FOLLOWING 

POSITIONS: 



EASY WORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$ 1 ,000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free information send 

sett-adCiessed, 

stamped envelope: 

^^ R&J Enterprises 

, Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 

Ingleside, III. 60041. 

EASY WORKI GREAT payl 
Earn $500 plus a week as- 
sembling products at home. 
No experience necessary. 
Call toll free 1-800267-3944 
ext 135. 



A leading mfr of Insulated 
glass windows has opening 
for an Englnccr/Tcch posi- 
tion. Seek Individual w/pto- 
gnmming abilities In C or 
CM-, Allen llradlcy PLCs A 
Parker I > j del 6k series; cap In 
troubleshooting-electrical/ 
mechanical, understanding of 
schematics/blueprints, gener- 
al shop A organizational skills 
3c AutoCad abilities. Compen- 
sation based on exp & knowl- 
edge. Exc bnft pkg In a con> 
m'l non-union firm. Pre- 
employment drug screen test 
req'd. EOE. Resume: 

Human Resources Dept 

Cardinal IG 

P.O. Box 99 
Greenfield, IA 50849 

Email: . 
Lrairocyecardlnalcorp.com 



FRIENDLY TOYS AND 

GIFTS thanks our customers. 
hostesses, dealers for their 
record breaking 2000. Hun- 
dreds won cash, prizes, 
trips. Become a hostess, 
dealer, manager. 1-800-48&- 
4875. 



• Front Desk Supervisor 
laintenance (Experience Preferred) 

Inn offers medical and dental packages, paid a 



Holiday 

vacations and more! 

. HOLIDAY INN GURNEE 

6 1 61 W. Grand Avenue, Gurncc, IL 6003 1 

Apply In person only. 




■♦ ■ 




F % 



201 Park Ave. 
PRODUCTS, INC. Uke Villa, IL 60046 

An equal opportunity employer 




Banking 



EXCEPTIONAL 



••• ■! 



• . 



BANKING OPPORTUNITIES 



NEAR YOU! 



Fine Mkiwtst Bank is one of Illinois' largest banking companies. We 
have assets in excess of $5,1 billion and approximately 76 offices 
in Illinois and eastern Iowa. We currently have the following 
opportunities available at our Gurnee & Waukegan, IL facilities. 

UNDERWRITER - SMALL BUSINESS 

(Gumce Facility) 

The individual we select for this position will be responsible for 
reviewing, analyzing and approving Small Business loan requests in 
accordance with bank guidelines. Will review credit applications, enter 
application and financial data as needed, and participate in all 
required training sessions for compliance. Compliance knowledge is 
necessary. Also responsible for the implementation of bank-directed 
policy and changes relating to regulatory amendments. A High School 
diploma or equivalent is required, as well as a 1 yr. minimum 
Consumer/Commercial lending background. We arc seeking a 
dedicated individual with strong interpersonal skills who is able to 
prioritize & work in a fast-paced team environment. 




INVESTMENT REPRESENTATIVE 

(Waukegan Facility) 

Thii position requires excellent communication/ public speaking skills 
as you will offer mutual funds, annuities, and life insurance to both 
internal and external customers while coaching/training branch staff 
on referrals and investment products We are seeking a results* 
oriented individual who is able to generate referrals, obtain or exceed 
personal production goals, and provide service to all investment 
customers on a continual basis. Will follow all state, national and 
bank compliance laws & issues, (including Liberty Securities & First 
Midwest Bank) as well as make sure regulatory policies are adhered 
to; namely those policies set forth by the NASD, the OCC, and the 
SEC Applicants must possess at minimum a H.S. diploma or 
equivalent (some college preferred), along with Series 6 or Series 7 
Licenses, life License, Series 63 required. Some sales experience/ 
previous sales success is required. Must have bilingual (Spanish) 
capabilities. Hours are Monday-Friday, 8:30am-5.00pm (some 
Saturdays). Travel required. 




We offer a competitive salary and a comprehensive benefits package. 
For immediate consideration, mail/fax your resume with salary 
requirements (indicating position of interest) to: Corporal* 
Recruiter, Fmt Mkiwtst Bank. 300 Hunt dub Road, Gum*., IL 
60031, Fax: 847-739-3689. EOEM/F/D/V 








First Midwest Bank 

Making life a little richer. 



visit our website at wvw.firstmidwest.com 



Direct Hire Positions 



SALES ADMIN ASST. 

$30K & DOE. Vernon Hills. 

ADMIN. (SMALL OFFICE) 

S25K - $30K DOE. Lake Bluff. 

RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE ADMIN. 
$35K. Lincolnshire Area 





MORTGAGE LOAN PROCESSOR 

$30 - $33K. Buffalo Grove Area. 
RECRUITER 

$45 - $50K. Vernon Hills. 

LOAN PROCESSOR 

$25K. DOE Ubertyville area 




Fax Resume to Sunny (847) 566-2116, 

or call (847) 816-8707 

* sunny.sIedge@adeccona.com 



Adecca 






Jewelry Retail Sales 



▲ Experience nice but not necessary 

▲ Hourly & commission 

▲ Honesty and integrity a must! 

A Full and part time positions available! 

Call 84 7-855- 1 1 70 to schedule an interview. 

Christian Bernard Jewelers (inside Gurncc m.im 

Exclusive borne of the men's diamond 

engagement watch 



MFRONT DESK 
RECEPTIONIST/ 
DENTAL ASSIST. 

.1 FULL OF1 PART-TIME 

Growing dental office in 

Round Lake Beach, with 

emphasis on customer 

service, wants you. Our 

office is a model for 

excellence. You win get 

paid while you are helping 

others. Some of our best 

employees have come 

from a variety of back 

grounds, so experience 

is not necessary, we can 

train the right person. 

Call (847)740-8827 

or email to: 

Doris@lntoract.com 



mamt«n*nc« 





EmiFs Pizza 




^ Bartenders 

* Delivery Drivers 

* Wait Staff 



Apply in person or call 

604 N. Lake, Mundelein, IL 

(847) S66-7UO 








Drmn.'Satxi &m 









Drivers. 






• AP/AR POSITIONS - $13-$15/HR 
Grayslake & Buffalo Grove area 

• CUSTOMER SERVICE - $12/HR 

• DATA ENTRY - $10 • $12/HR 

• ADMIN. ASST./RECEP. - $14 • S18/HR 

i 

Vernon Hills area. Temp & Temp to hire positions. 



General 

. Factory 

Maintenance 

Leading manufacturer 
of components for loud 
speaker industry seeks 
individual with 1-3 yrs 
exp for our plant in Ari- 
tioch. Ideal candidate 
is self-starter w/some 
exp in electrical and: 
~~ General Mechanical 

Repair 

Industrial Electrical 

Systems 

Compressors 

Pneumatics 
Apply in person or 
send/fax resume with 
salary history to: 
N u Way-Spea ker 
Products, Inc, 905 Anita 
Ave, Antioch, IL 60002; 
fax 847-395 8862; 
jweisgaienuway-speaker.com 

NuWay 




Call Sandra or Cassie today at 

(847) 816-8707 °r fa* vour resume to: 

(847)566-2116 



» 



1 we'll reward your 
efforts with these great Benefits: 




-. 









Pius, well donate 

$ 200 (per hire) 

to any church cr community 

organization that refers 
successfully hired members! 



• ft 70/hr to start 

• "500 sign-on Bonus* 

• Paid Training 

• NO nighti or weekends required 

• Blue Cross/Blue shield Medical 

• summers/Holidays OFF mtoum 

• Advancement opportu 

• Pro-school Children May Ride on Bus 
with Parent Driver (most 

• Independent Woifc Environment 



iriM 









If you or anyone you know has a valid drivers license. Is at 
least 21 years of age, and has not had a suspended license 

for 3* years, call us now at: 

1-800-319-8721 

Buffalo Grove, Arlington Heights, Vernon Hills, Wheeling 






OVER 20 LOCATIONS SERVING THE CHrCACOLAND AREA 

Equal Opportunity Imptoytf. 
•fttwNmon* 



INSURANCE 

Licensed P.L CSR . full- 
time position In pleasant 
; non-smoking Lake Bluff 
office. Computer 
knowledge (Applied), 
required call George or 
Karen at 

847-295-3030 



SHin q 

ELECTRONIC 
ASSEMBLER 

BUFFALO GRO 

Sandra or Cassl 
816-8707 
resume to 
2116 



Adecca 






GENERAL OFHCE 

Are you detail oriented & 
reliable? Would you like 

to work in a nice and 
quite environment? 
• General Office, 

Secretarial duties 

and computer use 

required. F/T or P/T. 

please call: 

■847-526-9253 

or fax resume to: 

847-526-9158 



B 









/OFFICE - PART TIME 

Immediate opening available .for a reliable, self-starter with 

the ability to work independently. Prior office exeperience a 

must Qualified candidate must be computer literate with a 

working knowledge of Microsoft Office. 20-30 hours per 

week, flexible. Starting wage between $8.00 • $9.75 per 

hour depending on experience. 

Please apply In person at Waimark Corp. 101 W. 

Belvidere Rd. (Rte.120), Round Lake Park, IL 60073 

between — 

8:00am - 4:00pm or fax your resume to 847-546-1 777 

attn: Susan Rosenlof 



i 







Position 

Must be able to cut and 
trim lawn, and handle 
general landscape pro- 
jects. Driver's license 
required. Call 847-362- 
1 247 or apply at 

ASCENSIO 



CEMETE 

1920 Buckley Rd.' 

UJ>ertyviHe, IL 

EEO M/F/D/V 





•*•« 









!i-^ 




• 









• * 



B32 /Lakeland Newspapers 



v 



*&?lVm!iiJsJD 








Over 300 




Readers Each Week 



MEDIA 





Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 








NEWSPAPERS 





Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



P 






f- 



HVAC 

SERVICE TECH & 
INSTALLERS 

InMUNDELEIN 

Earn up to $65,000/yr. 

Minimum 3 yr. exporlenco 

Good benefits. Ask for 

JOO 647-362-0262 



HORTICULTURE CAREER 
SEEKERS - Outstanding po- 
sitions available. Garden 
Center Managers and Land- 
scape Design Salespersons, 
Chicagoiand Suburbs. Com- 
pensation: 35K- 90K+ bone- 
fits. Call or fax Gary at (270) 
522-5070 or email: hortl* 
lab@onemain.com 



HELP NEEDED 

IMMEDIATELY • 

Wort At Horn*. 

Explosive Industries! 
$1,50O.$7,O00f/mo. 

Part/Full Tlmo. 

(414)200-9370 

www.finondoMroedonv 
from-home.com 



Secretary - Flex Hours 

Sales secy for industrial 

sales office. Hours can be 

flexible, i.e. 9-3, 

Northpak Company 

Grayslake, IL 

Fax info to 847-223-1716 
www.northpnkamsrlC4n.com 



SUBSTITUTE 

DIRECTORY 

- The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact 

the names listed below for further information, 

Requirement - Bachelor's Degree & 

Substitute Certification 

Adlai E. Stevenson High School District #125 

Two Stevenson Drive, Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

Contact: Personnel x 320 (847) 6>M000 

Antioch Community High School District #117 
1 133 Main Sl. t Aniioch, IL 60002 

Contact: Marie x224 (847)395-1421 

Aptakistlc - Tripp School District #102 

1 23 1 Wciland Road, Duffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Peggy (847) 353-5670 

Grayslake School District #46 

565 Fredrick Road, Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry xS319 (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 I lawihorn Parkway, Vernon UUls.lL 60061 

Contact: Shari Keena v . . .(847) 367-3279 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools * 

95 W, Dccrpaih, Lake, Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #41 



131 McKinlcy, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kaihy (847) 356-2385 

Libcrtyvillc School Dlsrlct #70 

144 1 W. Lake Street, Libcrtyvillc, IL 60048 

Contact: Cindy Flaieko (847) 362-9023 

Nippers Ink School District #2 

2018 Main Street, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Contact: Jane (815) 675-2342 

Wauconda School District #118 
555 N. Main Street, Wauconda, IL 60084 
Contact: Ext. 108 , (847) 526-7690 

Waukegan School Dlst #60 

1201 N. Sheridan Rd. , Waukegan, IL 60085 

Contact: Elaine Browder (847) 360-5406 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake,IL 60030 

Contact: Jody • (847) 856-3605 



BMaw gtfMftta 



• Salary plus Coi 

• Health Ins. 

• Dental Ins. 
•'Disability & life 

• 401K 

• Gas allowance • 

• Cell phone allowan 

• Musi have car 






,** 



w^r&x* 



%*»«?. 



^ 



^v^ 



. . f* 

Send resume to: 

David Sherman \, j^juoX 



c/o Lakeland Media 
30 S, Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

dsherm a n@ la Iceland 



oO^°» 



a** 



**?■ 



i , 



> + 



NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE 



HVAC TECH 

Woll established compa- 
ny needs oxporlonced 
service tech. Excellent 
pay, benefits, paid vaca 

and holidays plus Ins. 
Call 

847-623-4449. 



I7 «j 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE ♦ 



IMC Holding*, Inc., a leading man- 
ufacturer/distributor o( replacement 
parts, b currently wcklng personable 
IndMduab 10 answr telephone calls 
from distributor* and Cfllcr phone 
and fax order* Into the CRT. These 
Individuals mould also be responsible 
for filing, t>plngi and general clerical 
duties, 

QuallfJcallons Include: CRT expert* 
ence. Including data cntiy skills, the 
ability to project professionalism owr 
the phone, good organizational skilb, 
the ability lo wrk well with others, 
strong mfed/ writicn communlca* 
tlon sldlls, a high school diploma or 
djuWalcnt, and I )tar customer scr* 
vice aperience pnfcnvd. Hours arc 
10,1)0 am - fi;00 pm (Hon. - Fri.) 

Tc offer com pctitiw compensation 

and an excellent benefits package in 

an environment that encourages 

gromth. For cnmldfraUon, send a 

resume *1th salary requirements or 

apply In person from 9im to 5pm 

(Mon-Frl): 

IMC Holding*, Inc. 

95 South Route 83, Goyslikc, IL 

60030 Attn: Human Resources 

Fa* (8747) 225-9453 

E-Mail: JRUSS0OIMCH.COM 

Equal Opportuuty Bopkqcr HT 



Assistant Supervisor/ 
Fabricating 



Motal shop of loading 
Independent manufacturer of 
specialty lighting products 
seeks Assistant Supervisor 
wilh extonsivo knowledgo of 
mota| shop equipment & 
procedures. Act as primary 
source of dept. training; 
evaluate equipment, meth- 
ods and recommend system 
Improvements, 
Skills required: supervisory 
(lead), training, machine 
operation, blueprint reading, 
measurement equipment, 
Inspection, skill assess- 
ments, direct group leaders, 
otc. 
Apery In p«rsen or Mod rttumt to: 



Konnll Manufacturing 
1020 Lnkosido Drivo, 

Gurr»oo, IL 60031 
Fax: (647) 360-1781 

or e-mail lo: 'kmucllcr .1 kcnall.com 



Retail 

MANAGERS 
ASST. MANAGERS 

Fannie May Gmntfe* weki 
MANAGERS & ASSISTANT 
MANAGERS, tor our thopa 

In Lak» County. We n*od 
Woh-dnefffy, MlM-orfonted 

individuals committed to 

superior customer sarvtce. 

Previous M*n»Qer1&I exp. Is 

pref efred for manager cam** 

dates, Wa ofler an exceBent 

slarting salary A* beoeflts. 

Please contact 

Voicamail: 800-6800629. 

exL5524 

Fax: 847*968-4597 
FANNIE MAY 

eoerrVVh/v 



To Place An Ad With 



NEWSPAPERS 



Call (847) 223-81 61 or Fax (847) 223-269 1 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
FuIl'Tlmc 



letail 



Manager Trainees 



Gumee Mills • Hawthorn Mall 

PICTURE US GALLERIES 

CHICAGOLAND'S LARGEST RETAIL ART & FRAMING 
CHAIN IIAS 2 GREAT ENTRY-LEVEL POSITIONS AVAIL- 
ABLE. FULL TRAINING (BUT ART OR SALES EXPERI- 
ENCE A PLUS) 18K STARTING SAURY & BONUSES. 
MEDICAL/DENTAL PAID VACATION. ADVANCEMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES. SEND/FAX RESUME: 

DIR. STORE OPERATIONS 
3141 MACARTHUR BLVD. 
NORTHBROOK, IL 60062 
FAX: 847-272-4614 



CfyN Industrial Corporation, a manufac- 
turer of premium pneumatic and hydraulic 
couplings, seeks assertive people for the fol- 
lowing positions for its Gurnee location. 



Customer Service Inside Sales 



The qualified candidate will have excellent com- 
munication skills, strong technical abilities, knowledge 
of Windows based programs and a proven track 
record. Candidate's credentials should include a 
technical or marketing associate degree and / or 2-3 
years experience in industrial sales or related field. 



Individual will travel approximately 50% of the 
time in their efforts to develop, support and pro- 
mote CIUN products throughout the United States. 
The qualified candidate will have excellent com- 
munication skills, strong technical abilities, knowl- 
edge of the hydraulic hose and connector industry 
and a proven sales track record. Candidate's cre- 
dentials should also include a technical or market- 
ing degree and 3-5 years experience In the fluid 
power industry or industrial sales. 

CI\JN Industrial Corporation offers excellent bene- 
fits, competitive salaries, profit sharing and 401 K 

programs. 

To apply for these challenging and rewarding positions, 

■ .please mail or fax your resume to: 



Industrial Corporation 

Attn: Human Resources 



212 Ambroglo Drive, Gurnee, IL 60031 

Fax: (847) 263-7207 



Ill^ilU < rin^ 

<i|i|mrlnnlt } 



Kanall Manufacturing, the 

loading Independent manu- 
facturer of specialty lighting 

equipment, Is seeking an 
entry lovol Individual to pro* 
vido support to our engineer- 
ing deportment, perform rou* 
tine maintenance on bills of 
material, routings and Hem 
mastors. Additional respon- 
sibilities lnclude:porforming 
tost set-ups, documenting 
results of thermal / eloctrlcal 

tests performed on new and 
modified parts and products 
using equipment such as 
voltmeters, ammeters, power 
analyzer, thermocoupllng 
equipment, etc, Mo-chanteal 
aptitude and excellent com- 
munication skills are essen* 
tial. 



Apply in person or send *e*umo to. 

Konnll Manufacturing 
1020 Lnkosido Drfvo 

Gumoo, IL 60031 
Fa*: (847)360*1701 • 
or o-mail to: kmuollor ^konall com 



MECHANIC 

Gas & Dioset 

Hydraulic Equipment 

and Trucks. 

847-525-0858 



Customer Service 
Drivers '(Bilingual) 

CountlnpyColtectlon 
■ Data Entry 

REMEDY . 
Intellegent Staffing 

Call 847-509-3100 
$1t-$14/Tv. 



our new team 



time 



schedule, 



recelvel 

flexible 



meals. Management 
opportunities available, 

847-431-1310 



ROD PERSONNEL 

Land surveying firm 
seeks Rod Personnel to 
assist Crew Chief in the 
field. Benefits: Health 

lns.,401K. 

SEND RESUME: 

R.E.ALLEN, 

31S.SlusscrSt., 
Grayslake, I L 60030 

or FAX (847) 223-0980 



RECEPTIONIST/ 
ASSISTANT 

Hlllcrttt Nursing C#nttr 
FuB tkm position M-F 

8-4pm, Mutt h«v« pleasant 

phone manner and knowl- 
edge of Microsoft word, 
excel and experience in 

database. Pay based based 
on experience. ExceBent 

benefits and team oriented 
work environment 

Celt Joel for Interview 
(847)548-5300 

or fax resume to 

(847)548-7583 



• CNC TOOL 
ROOM 
MACHINIST 

mil 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



Established manufacturing 
company of ipokcr com- 
ponents needs s CNC tool 
room machlnbt.The candi- 
date MUST liave experience 
In set-up and operation of 
CNC latches and/or mills. 
We offer full benefits and 
salary commensurate with 
cxperinec. Qualified appli- 
cants may fax/send resume 
wlih salary history or apply 
in person at: 

NUWAy-SPlAKIR 
PRODUCTS r IHt* 

005 Anita Avtnus 

Antioch, IL 80002 
847-395-8882 (fax) 

jweis9d@rwway-Speaker.c0rn 



HNuway 



OTR DRIVERS - MARTEN 
TRANSPORT, LTD. Can pay 

you with 1 year plus expor- 
eince, 33« per mile. Call 1- 

800-395-3331.. 

www.marton.com 
Restaurant 

ELLVS PANCAKE 
HOUSE 

■ 

in Mundeloin-Now Hiring 

FT/PT AM SERVERS 

Must be experienced. 
AM shifts available. Call 

(847) 837-8100 



Part Tlmo Nights 
& Weekends 

■FRONT DESK 

Part Time 

■BREAKFAST 

HOSTESS 

Appty In Person 
COMFORT INN 

6060 Gumee Mined 
Circle East 
Gumee, IL 

847-055-8886 



PATIENT COUNSELOR 

Due to continued growth.privato company Is seeking 

responsible representative to develop telephone rapport 
and assist individuals In processing Medicaid appltca* 

tions. Must 

have ability to learn complex technical information to 
communicate effectively with various Individuals and 
government employees, maintain records, process work . 
under time constraint, and work wilh computer to process 
and document activity. We offer a competitive salary excel 
lent benefits to the selected individual that shows a strong 
work ethic and positive outlook. Fax or Mail resume with 
cover letter to : FAX: 847-887-8501 Kim Chapman, 

880 NorthpoInt Blvd.,Waukogan, II 80085 

EOE 



Retail 



CDL 




* Delivery Person-Non - 

* Rental Associate 

* Department Manager 

* Sales Associate 

Looking for a better job? Tired of those big chains? 
Tired of those 9:00 pm closing times? We're gearing up 
for Spring. We arc the Northern suburbs largest TRUE 

8c we want you, 

FULL AND PART TIMI POSITIONS* 

Better then competitive wages, benefits, 
paid vacation, medical, dental, 
401k & liberal discountl 
vlous experience a plus. Conveniently located at 
i corners of Rts 41 & 22 in Highland Park. 



Mutual True Value 

( all Dave, I'iiii, or Steve lor appoinuiK-nl 

(874) 432-0026 



PHARMACISTS 

& 
PHARM TECHS 

FOR MAILORDERS 

URQENTt Leader In 

medical temp staffing has 

many positions available 

N & NW Suburbs (or full . 

time on-going tomp, 

days/p.m. Must have 1 yr, 

exp. & current license. 

Superb pay scales with 

benofrt options and flexible 

hours. Alt calls confWon- 

tlal. Call: 
Medical Staffing Network 

800-2234230 



6 



PHOTOGRAPHY/ 
AMATEUR 

Has anyone ever told you 
that you take a great pho- 
tograph? If so, we would 
like to talk to jou about 
becoming a professional 
photographer. We will 
train. Earn $400 to $600 
wk. while loaming. Equip- 
ment supplied, car neces- 
sary, ■ 

708-338-0713 



PURCHASING 

Established Medical 

Equipment Supply Co. 

Is seeking 

a Full or Part Time, 

organized Individual with 

hands-on experience in: 
kwtrtoty Mngmnt/Bvye 
For condstderation call « 
fax Steeh Surgical Sup- 
ply Co., 4250 Im Aw. 

Qurn—M 60031. 
Attn.: John or Swan 

Phone: (847) 336-1985 
Fax (847 1336-0830 or 

•matt: 

* 



REAL ESTATE 

.Our rop-ranked Gbertyviflel 
(office Is upbeat, productive, 
iwelt-managed and staffed 
|wtth •team-players*. YauU 
be running In no time! Call) 
iTom Kreuser at B47-367< 
1 1 71 for appointment or de-| 
tails. 

Century 21 
Kreuser and Seller 



* 4 - 



RECEPTIONIST 

Busy Pediatric office 

needs full time 

Receptionist Bilingual 

a plus.. Fax resume, * 

salary history & 

references to Dariene at; 

847-823-0984 



RECEPTIONIST 

Great or^portunhy for 

up-beat person with 

excellent phone & 

customer service skills. 

Must be dependable 

with general office expert 

ence. Excellent benefits. 

Call: Unda 

847-433-8200 



] 



I 

1 



Sales Trainee 

We would like you to have 
one of the following sales 
experience, or some col- 
lege or experience in man- 
ufacturing w/packaglng 
machinery, but desire and 
energy will be most im- 
portant. 

Northpak Company, 
Grayslake, IL, 

Fax Info to (847) 223-1716 

www. north p* tuourieuLcob} 



TRAVELAGENT 

Immediate openings for 



at the 
Great Lakes Naval Base. 
3 years' travel/air lines 
reservation and SABRE 
proficiency Is a must. 
Knowledgo of military/ 
government travel* a plus. 
Wo otTer a competitive 
salary and excellent ben* 
cflts. 

Please fox resume to: 

SatoTravel, 

Attn: Valerie Wallace 

(847)785-8440 

Equal Opportunity 
Employr MffMH 



}) 



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• i 






pril 13, 2001 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Lakeland Newspapers I B33 





Over 300,000 Readers Each Week 




MEDIA 






NEWSPAPERS 




Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmc 





Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmc 




Help Wanted 

Full-Tlmc 




Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmc 




' 



Sato VTUal Ettat* 

We've Got 

Hi o Answers • • . 

to the Real Estate 

licensing Exam! 

Let america's *\ brokerage 
firm, COLDWELL DANKER, 
clue you in lo a wonderful 
career in Real Estate. Register 
now for the COL DWELL 
DANKER School of Real 

Estate and learn how easy get* 
ling your license can be. 

CLASSES START IN* 

ViRHON HILLS - MAT 10 

■ 

For more information about 

these and other classes starting 

soon, contact Sharon Piche, 

Real Estate School Director, at 

800-698.2776. 

Email: rcschool@coldwcll- 

banker.com. 

We are an equal opportunity 

employer m/f/d/v. 




School Ago Program 

Director Degreed and 

DCFS liconsablo with 

thorough knowledge & 

understanding of license 

& license exempt 

programs. Call: 
Dobra Trudo-Sutor 

YWCA of Lako County 

at: 847-862-4247, 

oxt 130 or fax: 

B47-6G2-4752. 







School Age 

Chlldcaro Program 

has a fyll time position 

available for an outgoing, 

fun -loving individual 

who enjoys working with 
children. Individuals 

must bo 25 years or 

.' older and have a good 
' driving record. Early 

CWkfoood Education or 

ti previous, experience 

'• refened. Competitive 

salary w/ benefits 

available. 

Contact Lynn Jonas 

847-626-7112 



Socurity 

. PUBUC SAFETY 

OFFICERS/ 

SUPERVISORS 

LEVY SECURITY 

CORPORATION 

NonrVNorthwest areas 
Immediate Openings ; 

Supervisors $12/hr. 
Otflcers/$10/Tir. I; 

Mm. stan»nopay(gtd) I 

MwScaVDental Bertests. Ufa 
Insuranca, Pakt Training. 
401 K Plan, $4,000 TuWon 

Raimbursamant. Paid 
Vacations. Uniforms. Great 
Promotional Opportunities. 
" .Call: 

1 •800-949-9389 XS62 

Apply on-line: 

www.lavytacudty.com 

^«y ECU 



CAHFJiK 

eiibfeES 



P. A. Professionals special 
Izc In assisting you In max* 
Ing new career choices, 
sharpening your skills and 
broadening your profes- 
sional horizons. Recruiting 
and marketing your skills 
for variety of positions 
Including: 

OFFICE POSITIONS 

• 

• Administrative Assistant 

• Customer Service Reps. 

• Data Entry 

PROFESSIONAL 
POSITIONS: 

• Internal Auditor 

• Senior Staff Auditor 

OTHER POSITIONS 

• Service Technician 

P.A. Professionals 

OURNEE LOCATION 

(847) 240.0000 ] 
Fax (847) 249-0040 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 



TRUCK DRIVERS OTR 2-3 

wooks. Solos and teams. 
Good miles/pay, excellent 
equipment and benefits, 1 
year OTR experience re* 
quired. Gulf Coast Transport 

1-888-988-6666. 



Technicians-Motorcycles 

Immed Openlng/laCrosse, 
Wl. Expanded sorvice 
dept reqs new Tech to join 
our team at this growing 
Honda Dealership. Get out 
of the rat race & join us in 
scenic LaCrosso. Wl., a 
great place to ride, camp & 
fish. 

Mr. Groan at TWO 
I BROTH- 
ERS HONDA 
(a pretty cool atoro). 888- 
781-5821 



Want to Work in a Fast- 
Paced Environment?: 

Full or Part Time 

VET.TECH. 

Experience as a 

Vet Tech. Required. 

Ploase apply in person 

or tax resume to: 
Mundololn Animal 

Hospital 

1133 W. Maple Ave. 

Mundelein, IL 60060 

Fax; 

847-888-6877 

No phono calls ploaso 



TO PUCE AN AD WITH 
LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 
Call (847) 223-8161 






TEACH IN FLORIDA Attend 
the Great Florida Teach-in. 
Juno 1. at the Sheraton 
VVorld Resort School dis- 
tifei^-wWrmterview teachers. 
Information, call 800-832- 
2435 or 
www.teachinfkxida.com 



TELEMARKETERS 
, NEEDED. 

$18/hr. Call now for 

Immediate apot. 
(847)725-2525 

Ask for Dennis, 

(847) 735-7100 

Ask for Gary. 

■ 

(847) 277-7880 
Ask for Bill. 



Want to Save 
Big Bucks?? 




TO PUCE AN AD WITH 
LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

Call (847) 223-81 61 



LAKELANDS 

CLASSIFIEDS 
CAN HELP YOU FIND 

THE RIGHT 

EMPLOYEES FASTI! 

TO PLACE YOUR JOB 

OPPORTUNITIES IN 

OUR CLASSIFIED 

SECTION, JUST CALL 

MONDAY-FRIDAY, 

8AM-5PM. 
(847) 223-8161 or 
Fax (847) 223-2691 



How To 

Sturvive 

Job 
Search. 






Medial 

Opportunities 




Medical 
Opportunities 



Medical 
Opportunities 



fWr 



• 



■El 









V* 



Plant your COTeeT 

where it's sure to 

with the best and' brisk test in healthcare 
at the Midwestern Resional Medical Center 

SPRING JOB FAIR 

Saturday April 28, 2001 



<• 



9:00 AM- 1:00 PM 

The Hampton Inn 



5550 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL 60031 

ht your ambitions toscther. with the best opportunities for a brisht future. As one 
of the most advanced/ comprehensive cancer centers in the U.S., we have the 
resources that promote professional o/owth. Advanced technolosy, state-of-the-art 
equipment, the latest medical treatments and team support - we have what mates the 
best career experiences. Attend our healthcare Job Fair and plant your skills where 
they're sure to srow. Midwestern Resional Medical Center is seeldna the following.: 




By Nancy Sakol 



Q: U lot would )OU suggest? I have been employed with the same com- 
pany for the past 2 years. The manager to which I report to is a mean 
man with little respect for anyone. He causes a lot of stress for all six of 
his employees (a few of them who have been here for 10 years), send- 
ing one employee, we beile\e, lo the hospital earlier this week with whu 
may be an ulcer. Rumor has It that the employee Is going to claim 
Workman's Compensation and teU all to the Insurance company about 
the way they are treated at our company. He constantly embarrasses, 

ridicules and disrespects anyone who works bdow his managerial level 
Sad as this sounds, be gets away with it I am at a point where 1 sec that 

nothing b going to change, because this manager has only lo report to 
die owner of the company who has not a due as to what is going on. No 
one wants to come forward to speak of It for fear of losing their job or 
creating a worse situation should the manager find out Is it time to 
move on? What would you suggest I do? EB. - Mundelein 
A: Unfortunately, there arc nasty people to this world who further thrive 
on their authority and the ability to strut their stuff and push their weight 
around. How utterly pathetic! A good manager Is one who has the abil- 

iry to treat others like they themselves wish to be treated, has respect for 

the work that others do to make them look good, and certainly doesn't 
waste time throughout the day with ridicule, embarrassment and disre- 
spect of their employees. I am sorry to tell you that this probably will 
not change since the owner Is more than likely unaware of the com- 
plaints. 1f working 40 hours a week with this manager has become 
intolerable, I will suggest lo you that you do not quit your Job until you 
have another lined up for yourself. Pass that on to others as welL This 
person sounds like the type that when you give notice, will not be kind 
and will not wish )x)u well. I would however more than try to get an exit 
Interview with the owner of the company, as soon as you have something 
dse lined up. What good will it do? Well, the possibility does exist that 
if the owner Is made aware of It, may be shocked, and bring inodiers 
mat report to this person to get full details and evaluate the nature of 
die complaints. There Is a lot to be said for experience on the fob and 
loss of good quality long-term employees. Hopefully the owner will see 

that something is askew and be willing to listen and take action. No one 
can force \ou to stay, and no one should have lo put up with an uncom- 
fortable work environment. The owner may in fact ask you lo slay. The 
choice is yours. Good luck 

Send your Inquiries to our new website 

wivw.superiorpersonnelcom 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 

and President of Superior Personnel in Gurnee. 

Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 

PLACEMl@aol.com 





- Registered Nurses: 

• Bone Marrow Transplant 

- Mammography Technologists 
-Nuclear Medicine Technologists 9 

- Physician Charge Coordinators 
' - Patient Care Technicians 

- Oncology Information Specialists 

- Development Assistant 

- Operating Room Technician 

- ER technician 

- Medical Assistants 
rand much more... 



ICU • Med/Surs • Oncolo9y 





Plant your ambition in a sowing environment, with professionals who treat each 

other and patients like family. If you're unable'to attend the Open House, 

please, forward your resume, indicating field of Interest to: Midwestern Resional 

Medical Center, Attn: HR, 2520 Elisha Ave, Zlon, IL 60099. 

Fax:847-872.6222. 

Gil ahead to book your onsite interview at: 847-872-6163 



Midwestern 




Niuica CINTU 



m\ iku* an) ..;atutwti • 



WOODLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT 50 
GURNEE GAGES LAKE 

CAREER FAIR 

Saturday, April 21, 2001 - 

10:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m. 
Woodland Middle School 
7000 Washington Street 

Corner of Washington Street and Almond Road 

Gurnee, Illinois 
Woodland is recruiting candidates for the 2001-2002 

school year. We are looking tor: 

* Certified Teachers, Grades K-9 a 

ft Special Educations 

ft Substitute Teachers ft 

ft Support Staff ft 

rivers ft 

of your resume and be pre- 
pared for an oh the spot screening Interview. 

Woodland School District 50 Is an 









Equal Opportunity Employer 




Medical 
Opportunities 




Medical 
Opportunities 



HeafthCare 

Great Pay, Good benefits. 
Shift and Weekend Differential 



Victory Lakes has the follow- 
ing positions available for ded- 
icated, lurd-worfclr.R people in 
our long term care facility and 
our retirement community. 

STAFF RN (Evening)— part time 

evening positions available, must be 

licensed lo Illinois. 

CN As (put ft fall time) — Starting 

» 

pay f 9.53/fcr. Want more boors and 
fewer day*? Consider oar 10-12 boor 
shifts! Want lo Job share with a friend 
or meet another CNA wtth whom lo 
job share? Together yoo can share 
)oor boors and tailor an opportunity 
lo fit your llfcsrytd let Victory Lakes 
help design a schedule that works for 
foot 

HOUSEKEEPER (full time, 
days & nights) — 3 positions available 

» Uh one rojul ring a dependable Indi- 
vid uaJ »ith Door care experience. 

DIETARY ASSISTANT (2 

positions: 4pm - 8pm, appro*. 20 

hrV»k or 14 hrsArfO— ¥10 assist m 
the dbaroom, selling up carts and 
tray-line scryke, serving trays, and 
cleaning up; might also assist in some 
aspects of food preparation. 
DIETARY j£ ASSISTANT/ 
FOOD SERVICE (13 hrsA*. 
weekends only)— Assist In kitchen, 
set op trays, bus tables and assist In 

some food preparation. 
WAIT STAFF (14 hrsAk, lari- 
ablc boors on Sat ft Sun,)— Take 
food orders, need 

tioo and organkaUonal skills. 

ENTRY-LEVEL MAINTE- 
NANCE ASSISTANT (Full 
Time)— Must be able to read, write 
and speak Fnt jis h t *«H In building, 
grounds, and general monitoring of 
security Abo able to handle safety 
equipment system and respond to on- 
she emergencies. Pay dependent I 

upon experience, $9.53^r- J 1144. 1 

Full benefits package available tf yoa | 
work at lea* 40 hrs. In a two- week 

period; contact us to learn more 

about our NET shift differential. 

Ploaso apply In pet' 
son at the 



S|l|.l)IIO| , .»luili.il!!<.iiih| , .nk.i^ 



CTTECH 

AJuTT, IDNS. 2 yrs exp as Staff 
Technologist ft I yr cap In CT 
pref. 

$5,000 SUJn On Bonus 

_ J MEDICAL 
TE CHNOLOGIST 

MT (ASCP) or MIT (ASCP). 
Per fo rms lab tests, procedures ft 
tasks at all levels of difficulty & 
complexity. Prcr. lab cap pref. 

S6.000 Sfcn On Bonus 

NUCLEAR 




• I.IIMM')> 



MEDICINE TECH 

F/T days, H registered N.MT 
$250 F/T $1,250 P, 

F/T ft F/T positions arail In the 
following units: Critical Care, 
Surgical Care, Surgery Services. 
Skilled Care, Med Care ft Labor ft 



PHYSICAL 





THERAPIST 

IL KT Lie. 8c MS or BS In FT rcq. 

Prcr. Inpatient FT cap pref. 
Resume: 

St. Mary* Hospital 

attn: Human Resources 
1800 E. Lake Shore Dr 

Decatur, IL 62521 
217-464-2385 Fax 217-464-1606 

Email dgoodnua8scKl.hahs.org 

Equal Oppty Employer 



«I<M I 



■'!!>! 



ylnpe 
[he 



Continuing Care 
Center 

1055 Grand Avenue 

. <|um vns\ »»i Deep I ukc 

Kn.uh I iiulinluirst. If. 

. or c.i II 
(847) 356-4551 WU 



CYIOT 
nTTRntTTOE S6Q 00 
. ROO fXPflBQ TOO 

Immed Opening/Tole- 

do. OH. Cytotechnolo- 
gist, CT (ASCP) or elig. 
for F/T position In the 
area's leading & high- 
est volume CAP ac- 
credited cytology lab. 
Salary Is highly com- 
petitive & bnfts in- 
(elude hospitalization, 

dental, •. group life ins, 
disability & 401k re- 
tirement - plant. Case 

load includes GYN and 
non-GYN - specimens 
w/fine needle aspira- 
tions performed in 
lab. If you would like 
to Join our rapidly 
growing profl team, 
send resume: General 
Mgr, Pathology Labo- 
ratories Inc. 1046 N. 

13th. SL. Ste 301. Tole- 
do. OH 43624; Fax 419- 
255-4830 







DENTIST 

Immed Open 

Ing/ Michigan. Career 

Oppty. small NW Michi 
gan town nr Lake 
Charlevoix. Partner- 

ship or Associateship 

to owner In solo 
group. Practice pro- 
file is family & child- 
oriented. Outstanding 
staff & facility. Com- 
passion, Integrity & 
communication req'd. 
231-536-2910 



EARN WHILE 
YOU LEARN! 

We are looking for 
applicants who will take 
care of elderly residents. 
We will train and certify. 

You will •am good 

sslsry whB* In 

ourcourse. 

Apply In person: 

Wauconda Healthcare 

&Rohab 

170 Thomas Court, 

Wauconda, IL 

. TaU 847/826-959 






; PEDSRN . 

Progressive North Shore 

Pediatric Group seeks 

quality Full-Time RN for 

great MD/RN team. Will 

train right candidate. 

Call ■■I 

847-480-2665 






I 



MEDICAL OPPORTUNITIES 

HELPWAKTBAD? 
Call (847) 223-81 61 



' 



. 






UCENSED PRACTICAL NURSES 

UP TO $5,000 



The North Chicago VA Medical Center has full-time 
• job opportunities lor LPN's in the Inpatient Mental 
■ Health area as well as the Geriatric Rehab area. 
These positions are days with rotations as 
wen as PM's. The VA offers competitive salaries 
and a comprehensive benefits package which 

includes Health and Life 

insurance, Thrift Savings Ptan (401 K), Retirement 

vacation, sick and holiday pay. Interested and qualified 

individuals may obtain an application packet by 

contacting Prudy Uttke at 

(414)384-2000. Extension 47295, 

its may bs subject to random drug screening. 
Equal Opportunity Employer . 






• » 









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B 3 4 / Lakela nd Newspapers 



CLASSIFIEDS 



April 13,2001 



ft 



i - 



•? 






Over 300.000 Readers Each Week 




i 



MEDIA 





NEWSPAPERS 




Medical 
Opportunities 




PEDIATRIC DlfTITinnS 

IMMED. OPENINGS/ 

KANSAS CITY MO. 

The Children's Morcy Hospl* 
lal's & Clinics, located In 
Kansas City, MO, seeks 
two Roglstorod Dietitians w/ 
exp in either Diabetes Edu- 
cation or general Pedia- 
tries. Responsibilities incld 
Inpatient & outpatient re* 
sponsibilities, A master's 
degree req'd & pediatric exp 
prof'd. We are looking for 
outgoing, independent, but 
team oriented individuals, 
who enjoy challenge. Child- 
ren's Mercy Hospitals & 
Clinics offers comp pay, 
great bnfls such as 
$3,0007yrfor tuition assis- 
tance, affordable health, 
dent & vision ins, generous 
paid time off, continuing ed 
reimbursement, pd moving 
expenses & licensure fee 
compensation. Please sub- 
mit resume w/ salary expec- 
tations to: 

Da ran Alpough 

2101 Gillham Road 

Kansas City, MO 64108 

816-234-3143 

Fax 816-855-1909 

Dalpough@cmh.tfdu 
www.chlldrcns-mercy.onj5 

FXDE/AAP 



PHARMACIST 



Immcd Opcnlnj^kwi Avwa Holy Family 
I kepital In EaherMlJc hit opening for F/T 
or P/T Staff Pharmacist FV* w*k hours 
Include limited wknd hrs & no nllcs, 
Wdys or call Olniol project opprjs citt 
In addition lo routine dharitnitivc ser- 
vice*. Both new gradi ft cxp'd 
Pharmacists eneounpxl to apply. Iloly 
Family, t member of the A*cn llcalih Jy»» 
leqt, offers a friendly ft support!*: work 
environment. Building project 1$ under- 
way »hkh will provVlc new Inpatient 
beds, sirgkal sites, childbirth center, 
same day surprry facilities ft emergency 
dcpL EsthcT^llc U a family-orienlcd com« 
muniry of about 7,000 In ,\W low, just 1 5 

ml E. of the Ukc OUbojl recreational 
ana. A compciJUvc sahiy, bnft pkg ft rcto 
a»t provided. Resume 

••**•••*•* 

Avers Holy Family Health 

attra Human Resources 

826 N. 8th Street 

Esthcrvilie, IA 513M 

712-362-2631 
Fax 712-362-6241 

Info* a vera -ho I yfamlly.org 

EEO Employer 

******•*#* 





Attontlon: Stay Homo 
And Work Onllnol 
Build your buslnoss in your 
spare time. EarnS1500/mo 
P/T; $4500-$7000 F/T. 
Free information 888*373- 

7696. 



Call 



(847) 
1-8161 



BUIJJ3ER/DEALERS WANT- 
ED GREAT Incomo potential. 
23 year manufacturer, Kiln 
dried logs, protected territory, 
log package, purchase re- 
quired. Mr. Buck 800-321- 
5647. Original Old Timer Log 
Homes. 



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MARKETER 

Nc»\l Issue: May 4 
Copy dctuHinc: April 2.5 

Call (847) 22.J-8I61 




Business 
Opportunities 



BV 9 I N^ S3 



Work from any location! 

$1,500+/moPT 

$3,000 +/mo FT 

Froo Information. 

262-812-5485 

www.f roodomf orevr. com 



EARNING WHAT 

YOU'RE WORTH? 

Earn 1200-7000/mo. PT/FT 

Working From Homel 

Fre« Information. 

877-694-4337. 

ir-at-home.com 






LOOKING FOR 
DEMONSTRATORS 

Selling our party plans. 

Beautiful gifts, cookin & 

Christmas products. 

Average $24/hr, 

OPEN INVITATION by 

House of Uoyd. 
Call Donna 

(847) 395-2395. 

WORK P/T FROM HOME 

Earn $500-$ 1,000/mo. 

Code 10406 or 

(847) 973-9297. 




Situations Wanted 



ELDERLY CARE. LIVE In/Or 

Coma & Go. Exc. ref. 

(847)838-0975 or 262-857- 
2266. 




COME PLAY WITH US in our 
North Chicago playroom. 
Busy Bee in-home childcare 
has several openings for Inf- 
ants & toddlers. Please call 
Charm Honry (847) 
688-0847. Location Park 
Ave. Near Navy Base & Ab- 
bott. 



FAMILYCARE 



Offers Nannies, House- 
keepers, and Caregivers 
CALL: 

(815)-759-9640 
(847)612-4669 

ISLAND LAKE MOM has 

openings days/evenings. 
Reasonable rales, fun activi- 
ties, loving environment. 

Sue (847) 487-5530. 
LOVING MUNDELEIN MOM 

has 1 immediate F/T opening 
for childcare. Reliable & rea- 
sonable. (847) 949-6952. 

SPRING GROVE EXPERI- 
ENCED mother of 2 has F/T 
and P/T child care openings. 
Refs. Available. 815-675-3737 



WAUCONDA, P/T live-out 
Nanny/Housekeeper to care 
for Infant son In our home. 
Ught hskeeping. 2-3 days 
per wk. Eng. speaking, own 
trans. Refs req'd. 847* 

487-9602 




School/Instruction 



PIANO LESSONS ARE FUNI 

Openings now available for 
students agos 6 & up. Adults 
welcome. 18 years experi- 
ence. -Lake Villa area. 847- 

356-9155. 

LEARNING TO READ CAN 
CHANGE YOUR UFE! 

•Professional tutoring 

services. 
•Adults and children 

welcome. 

•English as a second 

language. 

•Reading, comprehension, 

phonics, writing skills. 
Available days and even- 

. mo*- 

Vary reasonable rates! 
Mrs. vlordan. 

(847) 473-3688. 





Appliances 



WHIRLPOOL SUPER CA- 
PACITY HEAVY DUTY 

WASHER, 1yr. old, $300. 
Older gas dryer, works groat, 

$75. (847) 623-7346. 



NEED 
RESULTS? 



Buying? 



Selling? 



Trading? 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

to place 

your a " 

todayl 



223-8161 



223-2691 





My name is Morgan and I'm a Shi Tzu-Poo 
puppy. As you can tell from this picture, I was 
given a new mommy for Christmas. She Just 
loves me so much. I love to play In the snow, 

and I'm pretty goodjpf fetching my ball tool 
Oops, I almost forgot, Thank you daddy for giv- 
ing me a new mommyt 



April, 2001 




5096: What better way to 
display the magical 
moments of your mar- 
riage than with our wed- 
ding quilt. Transfers, 
complete directions for 
53" x 75" quilt included. 







5078: Handcrafted gifts 
express heart-felt senti- 
ments! Heart ring pillow, 
money bag and picture 
frame along with garter belt 
and crocheted basket create 
keepsakes to treasure forev- 
er. Printed pattern, direc- 
tions included. 

|AJI Patterns are $5.50 each 
Make Checks Payable to: 

ReADEJt Mail, Deft. #€101 

Box 520, Luoinoton. MI 4943 1 

Pkikt name* address, zip. 
pattern number ant) siz e. 

vua a ma5ttjicaxd ho 

tnftttka 



IVHl 





Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS MUST 

SELUWtNTER CLEARANCE 

Hugo discounts, buy now 
factory direct. 24x30, 40x60, 
30x48, 50x80, 60x100 & larg- 

er. Ideal for all uses. Win- 
ter/Spring delivery. 1-800- 

866-2784. 




Electronics 
Computers 



COMPUTER WORK STA- 
TION, desk, hutch & printer 
cart, exc. cond., 590. (847) 
244-7490. 



WANT A COMPUTER?? BUT 

NO CASH? With MMX Tech- 
nology, will finance with '0* 
down. Past credit problems, 
no problem. Coll toll free 1- 
888-871-3848. 




Garage 
Rummage Sale 



LINCOLNSHIRE 
RUMMAGE SALE 

• Stevenson High School 
Rt. 22 W, of Milwaukee Ave. 
Saturday 4/21, 8am-3pm, 



THIRD ANNUAL AUSSIE 

GA- 
- RAGE SALE 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 

8om-3pm. 

Follow the bunny signs to 

38606 N. Boechwood 

(off Grass Lake Rd.). 

Antioch/Sprlng Grove. 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 

BIG SALE, and there is still 
things that just did not go.... 
Call us at LAKELAND News- 
papers and run It under the 
'FREE or Giveaways* ' classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 

NO CHARGE! (847) 

223-8161,6X1.140. 




& 



Horses & Tacks 



AQHA 5YR. OLD Oay Mare, 
15.1 hands, rides Eng- 
lish/Western Trails, Team 
Penning. Great kids horse. 
Healthy. Consider payments, 

$3,750. (262) 662-6626. 




Household Goods 
Furniture 



GIANT MATTRESS 

SALE 

WHOLESALE TO YOU. 

*TWln mattross set, $9g. 
•Full mattress set, $150. "' 
♦Queen Mattress set-deluxe, 

$175. 

•Queen pillow top mattress 

set, $240. 
•King mattress sot 3-pc., 

$290. 

Name brands with full 

factory guarantee. 

Wholesalo to you. 

We boot all prices. 

Sheldon Cord Products. 

2201 W. Devon, Chicago. 

Open 7 days. 

(773) 973-7070. 



AREA RUGS. 2-SETS of 2 

ea. pattern. Approx. 5x6. 
$75. ea. rug. Loveseat, pale 
green denim, excellent con- 
dition, $100. 847-247-1039. 

BABY CRIB ROCKER, $30. 

Also a few baby clothes. 
(847) 867-7135 ask for 
Doris. 

Furniture, Couches for sale 
1 w/ black Ithr, 1 w/gray and 
white speckled fabric. (647) 

336-2200 

CANOPY KING SIZE BED, 

30yrs. old, excellent, no 
scratches, english style pan- 
elod solid headboard, heavy, 

$3,000. Debblo (262) 
862-6626, 

DINING AND DINETTE 
SETS, assorted desks and as- 
sorted light fixtures, grandfa- 
ther dock, armolres and as- 
sorted couches with love- 
seats. By owner. (847) 

430-6997. 



DO YOU NEED TO SELL 

THATtNEXPENSIVE ITEM 

TO SELL FOR $100 OR 

LESS? GET YOUR AD IN 

THE 

11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

THE GREAT LAKES 

BULLETIN 

& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY $6 PER WEEK 

- BY CALLING 

(847) 223-8161 

ASK FOR USA. 
EXT. 191 



ENTERTAINMENT 

CENTER 

HOLDS 25' TV, 

snerves for stereo equip. 

& storage cabinet 

Wood finish. 

$50,000(815)344-2490 



FORMAL DININGROOM SET 

FOR SALE Cherry tinish, 
hutch, table w/6-chairs, good 
condrtioa Paid $2,500, ask- 
ing $1,250. (847) 973-0992. 



MOVING END OF JUNE Sell- 
ing some furniture, Christ- 
mas decorations, lawn equip. 

ment. (8T5) 675-1437. 



SHARP LOOKING 

BRUNSWICK . 

ANTIQUE POCKET 

BILUARD TABLE. 

4-1/2x9(1, 3-pieces 

1-1/2' slate top. Mahogany 

with Ivory & Mother of Pearl 

Inlays. $7,500/best 

reasonable offer. 

(847) 662-0943. 




Household Goods 
Furniture 



THREE PIECE ENTERTAIN- 
MENT CENTER, Amlsh 
made, solid Cherry Wood. 
Center piece Is ^wldo, 
30'doop, 92*high. End piec- 
es 36 # wide, 24*deep, 

84*high. Must see to appreci- 
ate. Reduced to $2,8001 Call 
after 6pm. (847)356-1436 



THREE PIECE ENTERTAIN- 
MENT CENTER, good cond., 
$300; Queen size bed, com- 
plete, $160; Toshiba TV. 
$150; unfinished desk, $35. 
All groat condition. You pick- 
up. (§47) 33M666 leave 
message. " 




LawVCankn 



LAWN TRACTOR, 18 Horse 
Power wftti 42* Mower Deck. 

$500. 

(847)740-2415 

* 

TROY-BILT 12HP. WOOD 

chipper, like new, 10hrs, run 
time, $1,100/firm. (847) 

223-7197. 




$0 DOWN CARS1 As low as 

$29/mo. POUCE IMPOUNDS 
and REPO'SI 24mo's @ 
19.9%. For listings now 1- 
800-941-8777 ext. C-9816. 

$0 DOWN HOMESI No credit 
OKI HUD, VA, FHA. Call for 
listings. 1-800-501-1777 ext 
9815. 



$3,200 WEEKLY! MAILING 

600 brochures! Guarantoedl 
Froo supplies/postage. Mail 
LSASE: Celebrity Mailers, 
16625 Redmond Way #M233- 
C6. Redmond, WA. -98052. .. 

wwwxelebritymaUers.com 

CONN MINUTE THEA- 
TRETTE ORGAN, rhythm I 
unit, cherrywood, $900. Sum-** 
mit stair stopper, $75. Sta- - 
tionery biko, $5.0. Nordic'. 
Track Pro, $250. (847) v 

566-4799. > , ■ i 

i 

DO YOU NEED TO SELL* -> 
THAT INEXPENSIVE ITEM < 

FOR $100 OR LESS. . \ 
GETYOURADINTHE. ** 
11 HOME TOWN PAPERS 

■-■- THE 

GREAT LAKES 

BULLETIN 

& 

THE MARKET JOURNAL 

FOR ONLY $5 PER WEEK 

BY CALLING 

(847) 223-B161 

EXT 101 - * 

ASK FOR USA. 

* 

EARN WHILE YOU LEARN! 

Full training $500-$4500 
PT/FT tree information 414- 
290-6900. www.home-busl- 
ness-systems.com 

FISH FOR STOCKING: Hy- 
brid Bluegill, Largemouth 
Bass, Waheye, Saugeye, 
Perch, Crapplo, Northern 
Pike and Fathead Minnows. 

BROOKCREST FISHERIES, 

LTD., Cedar Grove, Wiscon- 
sin. (920)668-6385. 

FORD TRUCKS FROM $500 

Police Impounds: Toyota's. 
Chevy's. Jeeps. CALL NOW 
1-800-892-6999 ext C9855. 

HOT TUB SALE 14 models 
from $1,795-$4,395. Direct 
from manufacturer. Free vid- 
eo: 1-800-869-0406. Good 
Life Spas, 27th & O Street, 
Lincoln Ne. 
ftflw 




MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION. 
1ST. WORK on your comput- 
er. Guaranteed employment 
Train Jng/cerHfication (fee), 
Tarton Pub., Inc. 1-800-944- 
5595. 

i 

— 

MODEL SHIPS ALL wood 

construction, tug boats, 
schooners, Christmas tree 
ship, fishing Trawlers, sail- 
boats; SS'-eO', $200-$475. 
(262) 249-9695. 



MOTIVATIONAL CAS-* 

SETTES, excellent condition. 
Over $500 value. Best offer. 

(847) 516-8425. 



OWENS CORNING ROOF- 
ING, 40 bundles, 40yr. war- 
ranty. Retail $11 /bundle, 
$200 takes all. One seat go- 
cart with Briggs. & Stratton 
j.englne,^ , m $275. (847) 
497-8256, . 



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April 13, 2001 






Lakeland Newspapers I B.35 





MEDIA 






*•** 




Miscellaneous 



STARETT COMBINATION 

SQUARE SET. Craftsman 
oloctric impact. Bosch Jig- 
saw. (2) 14" car bid o Miter 
Saw blados. 25 gallon shop 
vac. Many books on auto re- 
pair, computers, Cad, elec- 
tronics, carpentry and home 
repair. Tubs full of Legos. 
(847) 395-0477 after 5pm. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commer- 
cial/Homo units from 
$199.00. Low Monthly Pay- 
ments FREE Color Catalog. 

CALL TODAY. 1-800-842- 
1310. 




Medical Equip 
Supplies 



WHEELER WALKER 

w/soat & basket. Paid $180, 
asking $70. (847) 587-7702. 




help main 
tain healthy circulation. No 
elastic to bind & cut off circula- 
tion. They donl fall down eith- 
er. They are made from the 
finest 100% cotton yarn. Six 
pairs for $18.99 plus $3.99 
processing & handling (pay- 
ablo In U.S. Funds only). Col- 
ors 'block' or •whito". If you or 
someone you know suffers 
from diabetes or circulation 
problems, these socks are the 
answer. Our customers tell us 
they fool the difference imme- 
diately! Sizes 9-11 or 10-13. 
All credit cards & personal 
checks accepted. 

' fiasco, PO Box 534, 

Amherst, 01! 44001-0534. 

I Toll Free 1 -000-094-5499 

MEDICARE NEBULIZER PA- 
TIENTS! Stop paying cash 
for Albuterol, Atrovent, 'etc. 
MEDICARE pays for them. 
Wo bill Medicare and deliver 

to your MED-A-SAVE 1-800- 
53&9849.exM7R 




Musical 
Instruments 



FOR SALE BASS GUITAR 

RACK and cabinets rig. 
Mesa Boogie Cabinet, hori- 
zontal with (2) 10' speakers. 
Mesa Boogie Cabinet verti- 
cal, with (2) 14' speakers. 
Hartko 'Transient Attack' 
cabinet with 14' speaker. 
Gallier Krueger 400RB power 

supply Rocktron 300G com- 

presor/limiter/gain reduction 
rack rider RR-15 power condi- 
tioner and light module. In a 
4 slot SKB heavy duty rack, 
$2,000/best. Call 843-4700 
ask for Eric. 




Pets & Supplies 



RATS FOR SALE, small 
$1.00; medium $2.00; large 

$4.00.(847)395-0071. 




Wanted To Duy 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parti. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coko Machines. 
Paying CASH! Call 

(830)985-2742. 



WANTED TO BUY 1-10 
acres near Ill/Wise, border, to 
build storage building. Ask for 
Jared (414) 862-2517. 



B»- 



WANTED TO BUY OLD 

FARM TRACTORS, Condi- 
tion not important. Prefer MM 
& Oliver, others brands con- 
sidered. Alvin (262) 

723-3980. 




LAKE VILLA 




Now Construction 

Subdivision. 
CUSTOM HOMES 

•4-bedrooms 

*9fL basements 

•1/4 aero 

•Control air 

•Low $200*8. 

FREE FIREPLACE 

with purchase before 2001. 

(847) 675-751 1 . 

ANTIOCH 181 Zollngor Ln. 
95' FRONTAGE ON CROSS 
LAKE. Charming 3-br., home 
on oversized lot with breath- 
taking views. Beautiful wood- 
work, wood floors and Fronch 
doors. Wrap around deck, 
pier, sea wall and sand 
beach. In time for summer at 

$279,000. (847) 838-1956. 
ANTIOCH BY OWNER, 2- 

story, 4-bodrooms, 2-1/2 
baths. 3-car gar., Emmons 
School Dtst, Regency Subdivi- 
sion. (847) 395-6269. 



ANTIOCH CUSTOM RANCH, 

with finished bsmt, 3-bd., 2- 
ba., custom kitchen cabi- 
nets, 6-bumer cooktop, sun- 
ken livingroom w/cathedral 
ceilino, fpi., afecrwd deck, 2- 

car gar., beautifully land- 
scaped, backs to pond, on 
quiet cul-de-sac. Near 
school, shopping & Metra. 

$200,000. (847) 395-5785. 

BEACH PARK 10083 Ford 
Ave., double lot, 3-bd., 1-ba., 
basement, 2-car gar. Needs 
remodeling. $75,000. (847) 

518-8470.B^ 




BRISTOL, W1SC. HOME for 
sale by owner. DIRECT AC- 
CESS TO LAKE GEORGE. 

Located minutes from IL/l- 
94. 4yrs. newt 2-story fronts- 
story back. Walk out base- 
ment-finished waiting for dec- 
orating with option 3rd. bath. 
3-bedroom, 2-futl bath. Ap- 
pliances optional. Gas fire- 
place. Bay windows over- 
looking water. Walk-in clos- 
ets. Upper and lower deck, 2- 
car gar., security system, 
whole house filtration sys- 
tem. Boat dock. Price 
$184,900. Taxes $2,500. No 
realtors. Serious inquiries 
only, must be preapproved. 

857-9928. 



FORECLOSED HOMES 

Antioch, Gurnee, Munde- 
lein, Round Lake, Wauke- 
gan and ZJon. Also„other 
areas available 
Coop & Associates Realty 
Phone (630) 227-0394. 



FOX LAKE FOR SALE BY 

OWNER, hillside ranch with 
full finished walk-out base- 
ment, 3-bedroom, 2-baths, 
skylight, fireplace, $132, 

(847) 587-2629. 



If! 



FOX LAKE IN TOWN Cozy 
2-bedroom, all appliances, 
2-fgar., storage shed, deck, 
fenced back yard. Residen- 
tial/Commercial. $103,500. 

(847) 201-1963 




Homes For Sale 



Gov't Foreclosures 

Wsukogan, Zoo, Round LaVo. 
McHenry, Inglonde & other 

area*. Make offer. 

Ask about homos wf 

zoro down payment 

Wostom Realty 

1 -630-495-61 00 




GOVT FORECI 

HOMES 

Aslowas$199/mo| 

Gov! & Bank Repos 

4% down! 

No Credit Neededl 

For listings & pymL dotails 

1-800-501 -1777 

oxl. 9203. 

GURNEE 2-STORY ALL 

brick and stucco, 2-car at- 
tached garage, 5-bedrooms, 
4-baths, (amily room, formal di- 
ningroom. oak staircase and 
trim, 2 masonry fireplaces, 
laundryroom, full basement. 
Very attractive home in nice lo- 
cation. $335,000. (847) 
623-2870. 

I BUY HOUSES 

Any size 
Any price. 

CashJMl 
(630) 268-7908. 




GURNcfc L0CATI0N51M- 
MACULATE 3-BEDROOM 

RANCH on HUGE lot, con- 
venient. $143,000. No 
money down possible with 
good credit (847) 465-6120. 

INGLESIDE RANCH, 3- 

BDRM., 2-ba.. full-fin. bsmt, 
att. 2-car gar., C/A. fenced 
yard, storage shed, all ap- 
pliances included. Asking 
$145,000. Call for appoint- 
ment (847) 973-0525. 

JOHNSBURG 4+BR. 3BA. 

Full basement. 3-car garage. 
Ample storage. Bank ap- 
praised $187,000. Motivated 
sellers, make offer. 815-344- 

6201. 'm 



KENOSHA-4120 51 ST. 

AVE., Spacious, secluded 5- 
bd., 2-1/2 car garage, fire- 
place. $1803. (262) 
654-7598,(262)914-3010. 

LAKE GENEVA IMMACU- 
LATE NEWER home, many 
extra touches, cathedral ceil- 
ings, fireplace, skylight, 
hardwood floors, whirlpool 
tub. Already reduced price, 
$145,000. Must sell, make 
offer. Days (262) 248-2414, 
evenings (262) 279-3112. 

LAKE GENEVA, WISC. 

Wooded Wisconsin Retreat, 
near Illinois border. 4-bed- 
room, 2-bath, cathedral ceil- 
ings, fireplace, familyroom, 3 
decks, well maintained, 

$189,900. (262) 248-1643.V 



LAKEFRONT HOUSE ON 

beautiful Beaver Dam Lake. 
Enjoy 42 miles of shoreline 
on Wisconsin's 5th largest 
lake. Great fishing, swim- 
ming, boating. 3-bd., 2-ba., 3- 
car gar.. 260ft. shoreline. 
Beautiful year round home. 
$169,000.(847)265-9411. 




FOX LAKE- MOTIVATED 
SELLER . Must sell 4-bed- 
room, 2-story home In Dunns 
Lake Estates, w/boat slip on 

Chain O'Lakes. $289,000. 
(815)675-2641. 



REDUCED LAKEMOOR 
FARMS. BETTER THAN 

NEWI William Ryan Home, 
ranch, 1565sq.ft., full base- 
ment, fenced & landscaped 
large comer lot, open view, 3- 
bd., 2-ba., Puron A/C, fire- 
place, skylights, Jacuzzi. 
Roughed In 3rd. bath Many 
other upgrades. S199.950K. 

(815) 578-0738. 



FOX LAKE WATERFRONT, 3 

bd., 1-ba., 2-car gar., fenced 
yard. A/C, city sower & wa- 
ter, i $146,000. ' (847) 
587-7160. 



VENDO CASAS EN Round 
Lake Interesados favor de 
llamar. Al Bepper 237-5427 

Con La Sra. Belen. 



Over 300,000 

mi 




Each 








NEWSPAPERS 




Homes For Sale 




Homes For Sale 




Homes For Sale 



UNDENHURST LEASE TO 

OWN. Only $3,000 down 
buys newer brick/vinyl sided 
2-story, 4-bd., 2-1/2 ba., fami- 
lyroom w/fireplace, dining- 
room. 2-car gar., basement. 
$1.650/mo ♦ utilities, 

$210,000. (847) 223-6269. 

UBERTYV1LLE HOME 4- 
BD., 1-1/2 ba., livingroom 
w/stone fireplace, family- 
room, dinlngroom, 2-1/2 att. 
gar., enclosed porch, patio, 

$259,000. (847) 816-0316. 
MUNDELEIN 3-BD., 1-1/2 

bath, 2-story single family 
home, cu- do-sac lot, largo 
fenced backyard, close to 

schools, $164,900. (847) 
970-9047. 

MUNDELEIN 3-BD., 1-BA., 

whole house remodeled, 
C/A, nice size shed, 2-car 
gar., fenced yard, park 
across the street, all newer 
appliances can be negotiat- 
ed. Perfect house for a fami- 
ly w/children. $156,000. 

(847) 548-4453. 

MUNDELEIN F.S.B.O. BEAU- 
TIFUL 2-story split, 3-bd., 2.1 
ba., livingroom, diningroom, 
familyroom, fenced yard w/irv 
ground swimming pool, 
Hawthorn Schools, 

$219,500.(847)949-8775. 

MUNDELEIN F.S.B.O., 501 
S. Lake. Beautiful 4-bd.. 1.5 
ba., raised ranch, w/2-car 
gar. New furnace, C/A. kitch- 
en, baths, windows, carpet, 
paint, driveway & more. 

$169,900. (847) 922-6898. 



PELL LAKE REDUCED FOR 
QUICK SALE F.S.B.O.. beau- 
tiful 3-bd. ranch, spacious 
kitchen, fireplace, new car- 
pet and roof, city sewer and 
water, attached 1.5 car gar. 
Asking $119,500. (262) 605- 
9496. 

MCHENRY WALKING DIS- 
TANCE On Boone Creek. 
Professionally renovated 4- 
bedroom, 2-bath home. Lo- 
cated on Boono Creek and 
within walking distance of 
McHenry. New everything 
throughout (cad for complete 
details and free mortgage pre- 
approval) 0% down financing 
available. This home is in 
mint condition, $163,000. 
(815) 479-1985. 



TREVOR, WISC, 1 possible 
2 bedroom ranch. Only 
$63,000. Has Oilier Cert. Will 
discount for quick cash 

Close. (847) 587-0248. 
TWIN LAKES, WISC. 3 bd., 

2-1/2 ba., custom brand new 
2300* sq.ft. homo, $199,900. 
282-552-7640, 262-705- 
3302. 

WAUCONDA UNINCOR- 
PORATED, 3-BEDROOMS . 2- 

balhs, on ■ 1.2 acres, 

$218,000. (847) 487-8427. 



Ready, Willing and 

Able Buyers for 

Your Home - 






Regardless of condi- 
tion or reason for 
selling. Call Gary or 
Mike today at Kell- 
er-Williams 
Statellne Realty 
(847) 838-9445 



Z10N 1903 JOPPA, F.S.B.O., 

3-bd. ranch, bathroom recent- 
ly remodeled. New vinyl sid- 
ing, fresh paint, large living- 
room with neutral carpeting. 
Large kitchen with new oak 
cabinets, large fenced in 
backyard, ceiling fans 
throughout Asking $79,900. 
Ptease call (847) 791-7109. 
Also see 

wvw.goocities.com/cjodi 




Homes For Rent 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 

bd., 1-ba. . ranch. Asking 

$99,900, (847) 740-6451. 

Mon.-Frl. after 6pm. Sat. & 
Sun. after 8am. 




MUNDELEIN SYLVAN LAKE 
FOR SALE BY OWNER 

Beautiful lake view from this 
1-1/2 story home with 3bd., 2- 
fult baths, master bed with 
walkout balcony, and short 
walk to private beach. New 
roof, siding, windows, kitch- 
en, baths, furnace, central 
air, carpet and more, 

$1.99.900. (847) 922-6898. 

MUNDELEIN, OAK TER- 
RACE, 0116 HICKORY (OFF 
83), F.S.B.O., 3-bd.. 2-ba. 
9yr. old ranch, vaulted ceil- 
ings, livingroom, diningroom, 
kitchen, fireplace, 2 1 /2-car 
attached gar., large deck, ga- 
zebo & fence & full bsmt. 
$209,90O/besL Immediate 
occupancy. (847) 548-7693. 

MUNDELEIN. 4BR/3BA. 

BRICK Ranch, plus in-law ar- 
rangements. Backs up to 
open space. Exc. Cond. 
Must seel 847-566-1816. 

WAUCONDA NEWLY REMO- 
DELED, POSSIBLE owner 
finance. 3-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, hot tub, 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage. 123 Oaks. $162,000. 
(773) 637-7531. 

NO MONEY DOWN! 2-bed- 
room Lake Villa ranch, newly 
updated, move-in condition, 
fenced yard w/lg. deck, laker- 
ights to Crooked Lake. Under 
$100,000. FOr more informa- 
tion & set appL call 1-800- 

359-1490.6x14031. 
NORTH CHICAGO CLOSE to 

Naval Base, easy access to 
41 d expressway. 3-bd.. 3- 
ba., marble fireplace, Pergo 
lloors in kitchen w/celllng 
fans, finished basement 
w/wetbar, 2-1/2 car gar. 
w/storage loft, vaulted ceil- 
ings w/skylights, Ig. yard 



ROUND LAKE BEACH Spa- 
cious 4-bedroom. 1-ba. Cape 
Cod renovated, new carpet- 
ing, appliances, 1 -block from 
beach, walk .to train, school. 
Ready to move In. $87,000 
Owner (847) 223-8081. 



ROUND LAKE PARK IDEAL 
STARTER HOME1 Cape Cod. 
2-3 bdrm., 1.5 bath, skytts, 
ovrszd 2 car gar., new roof & 
drive, spacious greatroom. 
bright, dean and ready for 
immediate dose. Only 
$99,0001 Call owner (847) 
563-3001 ext 2031. 



ROUND LAKE, BRIGHT 
MEADOWS SUBDIVISION 

Spacious & sunny home 
built in 1995. Includes 3-bed- 
room, 2.5 bath, vaulted ceil- 
ing in masterbedroom w/ceil- 
ing fan, walk-in closets in all 
bedrooms, 6-panel pine 
doors & pine trim throughout, 
fireplace, bft.«in humidifier to 
furnace, wood fence & deck, 
finished bsmt. w/crawi. In- 
dudes extras such as dog- 
gie door from yard to garage, 
much landscaping w/Tiowors 
& beautifully decorated to 
move right in. $171,000 (847) 
740-9515 Christ! or Domi- 
nick. 

SALEM, WISC. 23723 82N0. 

PL, Lake rights, 4-bds., 4 
lots. Approx. .65 acres. Re- 
place, 1-3/4 baths, office or 
potential 5th bedroom in full 
basement, many updates, 
I2'x30' deck, 3-car gar. Moti- 
vated seller. For appointment 

call (262) 843-2205. 



ANTIOCH 3-BD., 1-1/2 ba., 2- 
car gar. No pets. No Section 
8. Agent owned. $l,i50/mo. 

(847) 367-8686 ext. 208. 

GRAYSLAKE SCHOOLS1 3- 
BEDROOM, 1-bath, w./base- 
ment. No pets. No Section 8. 
Immediate occupancy. 

$975/mo.-futilities. Can Cen- 
tury 21 Russ Gwartney (847) 



• '•I 



GURNEE RANCH, 1 -BR., car- 
peted, Lfl, FR. kit. & 1-ba.. 

(older home), $895/mo. ♦ 

sec. (847) 336-8866. 




INGLESIDE LARGE 2-BD. 

house on 5 acres, full bsmt.. 
attached 2-1/2 car gar. 
w/heated office, beautiful set- 
ting. $l.i75/mo. + sec. & 
credit check. (847) 587-5715 
after 5pm. 

WHY ARE YOU RENTING? 
Mortgage payments will be 
less than your rent payment. 
Everybody gets a home. No 
down payment home loans 
available. No costs consulta- 
tion. Call Tom Ischkum. 847- 
605-8244x177. 




ANTIOCH GOLF COURSE 

townhouseHB F.S.B.O. 

OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN., 
1PM-5PM., 39875 GOLF LN. 

2-bd., 1-1/2 ba.. 2-car att, 
gar., full fin. bsmt. w/17ft 
cedar lined -closet, gas fire- 
place, C/A. cathedral ceil- 
ings, ceramic tile, abundant 
storage, all appi. Ind. Ask- 
ing $139,900. (847) 




SPRING GROVE ON 

CHANNEL, nice 1 -bedroom 
cottage with fireplace, also 
large fenced-in backyard, plus 
boat dock, owner financing, 
$89,900. 20% down, 
$750vmonth. (847) 497-3256. 
(847) 988-2078. 



w/konnel. Asking $170,000. SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 



Call Mike (847) 817-0166. 




Apartments 
For Rent 







Apartments 
For Rent 



To Place An Ad With 



E 






I €■ 



[I 



NEWSPAPERS 



Call (847) 223-8161 or Fax (847)223-2691 



Now Renting! 
1, 2, & 3 bdrm apartments 



Oakridge Village Apartments 

299 Oakridge Ct, Antioch 

Offering affordable housing for 

qualified applicants. 

Wheelchair accessible, 1 bedroom. 
Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 
INTERNET1 

Visit http7Avww.lpnews.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet,- in ail Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 
tor only $20.50 tor 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 
then .60c each additional 
line. 






Call today! (847) 395-4840 

(800) 526-0844 TDD 



UNDENHURST TRI-LEVEL. 

3 BDRMV2-1/2 baths, 2-car 
garage, fireplace, central air, 
new Pergo flooring, Berber 
carpeting, fenced yard, 
screened porch, pool, deck, 
patio, . beautifully land- 
scaped, $194,900. (847) 
356-3614. 



ANTIOCH TOWNHOUSE 
END UNIT ON GOLF 

COURSE. 2-bd.. 2-ba., at- 
tached gar., built 2000. 
$135K. F.S.B.O. (847) 
838-4383. 



ANTIOCH TOWNHOUSE 
END unit, 2-story. 2-bd., 1.5 
ba., 2-car gar., partial base- 
• ment, appliances, neutral 
decor, satellite, home warran- 
ty, tow association. Close to 
shopping & Metra. $107,900. 
(847) 975-4414. 

DOOR COUNTY CONDO 
LANDMARK RESORT-EGG 

HARBOR 2-bd.. 2-ba., fur- 
nished, I/O pool, fitness cen- 

tor. Anxious tojf sell, 
$122,900. (847) 540-0058 

evenings. 

i 

FOX LAKE CONDO Access 
to Chain. O'Lakes. Newly re- 
modeled 2-bd., 1-ba., new 
kitchen, washer/dryer, mi- 
crowave, newer C/A, upgrad- 
ed electric, washer/dryer, 
laminate floor, swimming 
pool, marina, private beach, 
security, $79,900. (847) 

587-7424. 



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FOX LAKE TOWNHOUSE 

F.S.B.O. Remodeled, tri-lev-. 
el, with lakeview, 3-bedroom, 
2-1/2 baths, light Interior, 

.900. (847) 973-2835. 

-'-n.c a a s si ji - a u 




I 




Condos 
Townhomes 



GURNEE 2-BR„ 2-BA. fp., 

new appls.. new cptg., new 
ceramic firs., att gar., Indry 
rm, cathedral ceilings, 

$114,900.(847)263-6313. 
GURNEE HEATHER RIDGE, 

2-bd., 2-ba. condo In Heather 
Ridge. Comes with applianc- 
es, woodbumlng fireplace, 
central air, huge balcony, 
discounted access to golf 
course. 3rd. floor of elevator 
building, handicap accessi- 
ble, $1 05.000. Mention Judy. 
Call Pat (847) 362-8402. 

INGLESIDE TANNERON 
BAY on Woostor Lake. 2-3 
bd., loft. 2-1/2 ba., beautiful 
oak staircase, whiro trim and 
cabinets. Gas fireplace, sky- 
lights,, all new appliances 
stay. Reverse osmosis water 
system, A/C, 2-car gar., boat 
slip-new pontoon optional. 
$186,900. Call (847) 

546-9766. 



UBERTYVILLE LUXURIOUS 
TOWNHOUSE, beautiful lo- 
cation, against woods, 2-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, loft, vaulted 
ceiling, skylights, and great 
upgrades, $179,900. (847) 
549-6860. 

MUNDELEIN $149,000 2- 

bd., 2.5 ba., townhome. 
1400sq.ft., 1-car gar., 2nd fir. 
laundry, eat-In kitchen, liv- 
ingroom, formal diningroom, 
storage. Quiet! F.S.B.O. By 
appt (847) 917-3605. 

ROUND LAKE 2-BD., 2-1/2 

ba,, 2-decks, 2-car gar. Eve- 
rything Is done for you. New 
carpet, paint, new tile floors. 
In secluded wooded area. 
$114, 




TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE 
BY OWNER. 3-bedrooms, 2- 
baths. Waukegan address. 
Gurnee schools. No garage. 
Includes washer, dryer, built- 
in dishwasher. Needs new 
air conditioning. Sold as is. 
$84,500. Call Diane (647) 



WISCONSIN 1-BEDROOM 
CONDO. Furnished with out- 
standing view of Lake Gene- 
va. Seller very motivated. 
Pool, low association & tax- 
es, reduced to $69,000. Pets 
welcome. (630) 293-5424. 




Mobile Hi 



MOBILE HOME 14X70 
VERY NICE. MUST SEEl 

Reduced to sell! Bottom dol- 
lar $15,000. Beach Park. 

(847)223-5945. 

* 

1978 MARSHF1ELD MOBILE 
HOME. 3-bedrooms, 2-futl 
baths, 2 extra additions, ask- 
ing $23,500. If interested can 
Paula at (262) 537-3729. 




1995 MOBILE HOME 71x14. 

2-large bedrooms, 2-futl 
baths, new appliances plus 
new C/A. Meticulously cared 
for. Too much to list. Asking 
$28,000/best. ' (847) 

740-7673. 

ARTCRAFT 1990 BY Wick 
Builders, 14x64. 2-bedroom, 
1-bath. Stove, refrigerator, 
washer and dryer. 10yrs. left 
on the guarantee of shingled 
roof. Excellent condition with 
central air conditioning and a 
new storage shed. £21,1 

(262) 551-0639. 



• ft 



BEACH MOBIL HOME 

PARK, mobil home for sale. 

3 BR. 2 BA double wide. 

38703 N. Sheridan, Lot #137. 

(847)625-0439 



PLEASANT PRAIRIE, WISC. 
FAIRMONT 1989 16X80 3- 

bdrm, 1.5 bath, appliances, 
A/C, FP. $27,500. 1817 
104th St., Lot 97. (262) 
694-6046. 




* 



. : 



FLORIDA, EXTRA LARGE 

Mobile Home, 2-bedrooms, 2- 
baths on J acre, 100% pure 
air, 40 miles from Daytona 
Beach. $36,000 as Is. Furni- 
ture included. Heat/air condi- 
tioned. (773) 763-0610. 

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B36 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIEDS 



April 13, 2001 



Over 300 



Readers Each Week 



MEDIA 




MOBILE HOME 16X76 Sky- 
lino, Forest Brook Supremo, 
3-bedrooms t 2-baths, Jacuzzi 
tub, lots of upgrades, extra 
clean. Must be moved. 

$35,000/best. (815) 

334-8202. 

MOBILE HOME 12X48, 

newly decorated, stored in Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must soil. 

$3,750/best. (708) 453-5948. 

MOBILE HOME 14X70, 3- 
bedrooms, 1*1/2 baths, 3 
year old furnace and central 
air, 2 year old water heater, 
new carpet, asking $16,500. 

(262)697-8241. 

MOBILE HOME UPDATED 

2-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, senior 
park, low lot rent, $11,900, 

(847) 338-5539. 

MODULARS - DOU- 
BLEWIDES-SINGLEWIDES- 
ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMEI 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 

MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS. WE DO IT ALUI FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY 

AND INSTALLATION. RILEY 
MANUFACTURED HOME. 
800-798-1541. 

MOTOR HOME 1992 Hornet, 
27ft. long, low mileage, (262) 

694-2543. 

OAKWOOD PARK, LOT 113, 

1990 Sterling double wide, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-full baths, air, 
shed, deck, appliances. 

(262) 657-3106. 
SPACIOUS 3-BR. MOBILE 

home in Beach Park. Must 
see to appreciate. $19,500. 
Serious inquiries only 

please. (847)625-1534. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

LOCATED IN AN OVER 55 

COMMUNITY 

•1 -bedroom, 1-bath, 

start at $28,500. 

*2- bedroom. 1 -bath 

start at $29,900. 

•2-bedroom, 1-3/4 bath, 

start at $52,500. 

*2-bedroom, 2-bath, 

$29,900. 

*3-bedroom, 2-bath, 

$54,500. 

Some include carports, 

sheds, screen room, decks 

. (847) 526-5000 

leave message. 




FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM 
LAKEFRONT APT., $475/mo 
+ sec. (847) 587-1865 leave 

message. 

FOX LAKE NICE 1-bd.. new 
carpet, $650/mo. includes 
heat & gas. No pets. Securi- 
ty & references. . (847) 

526-4435. 

FOX LAKE VACATION 
VILLAGE, 1 Bdrm.,security, 

pool, tennis, marina, laundry. 
Early pmnt. $550.00/ mnlh. 

NO PETS. Call 847-5B7-5347 

FOX LAKE, 2-BR. 
LAKEFRONT APT. 

large deck. $770/month. 

{847)506-1406 

FOX LAKE. STUDIO. Vaca- 
tion Village. $500/mo. KARE 
Management. 847-367-0890, 

GAGES LAKE FURNISHED 
EFFICIENCY, utilities paid, 

$150/Wk. (847) 426-2766. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 

APARTMENTS LAKE VILLA. 

Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, $895- 
$815/month. Heat, water, air 

included, (847) 356-5474. 




Apartments 
For Rent 



GURNEEAVAUKEQAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Alfordablo Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 



WAUCONDA 1-BD. APT. 

Newly decorated, heat & hot 
water Included, $610/mo„ 
lease, sec. dep„ ret. No 
Pets. Available immediately. 

(847)433-0891. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Large bright & beautiful 
studio. New conditions. 
Includes all util. & appl. 
1 -car att. heated garage. 

Includes cable TV. 

Available immediately. 

No pets. $795/mo. + sec. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message.* 

ZION. efficiency, Newly re- 
moval Base . (Military Clause 
accepted) All utils includes, 

$475. NO pets. (847) 204- 
0376 




ROOMMATE WANTED for 2- 
bd., 2-ba. apt. in Lake Bluff, 
1060sq.ft„ vaulted ceiling, 
W/D, cable, parking, club 
house, pool. Close to Abbott 
& Great Lakes, $555/mo. + 
utilities, clean & tidy. Mike 

(847)615-9404. 

ROOMMATE WANTED JUST 
NORTH OF ANTIOCH Spa- 
cious bedroom w/private 
bath, cable, tulty stocked 
kitchen, washer/dryer, many 
amenities, $500/mo. Joe 

(262) 889-4002. 
ROOMMATE WANTED to 

share. 3BR home 2-car ga- 
rage in Gurnee. $500 & t/2 

util. 847-625-0883. 
WANTED ROOM TO RENT. 

Chicago resident needs 
room, preferably Grayslake, 
4-5 days/week while working 
for local company. May 1st, 
month-month? Perfect room- 
mate: no furniture, rarely ar- 
ound. (847) 543-4600 ext. 

307. email: 
jcannon@interaccess.com 




SEMI FURNISHED IN 

HOUSE, Quiet, clean con- 
venient. Use/torms/negoti- 
able. $75/wk. (847) 

360-9568. 




Business Property 
For Sale 



FOX LAKE BEAUTY SHOP 
FOR SALE. Owner retiring. 

Take over clientele. Great lo- 
cation, low rent. Two sta- 
tions, w/room for four + mani- 
cure station, $10,000. (847) 
587-1620. 

HATFIELD, Wl- 

Supper Club/Dining/C- 
Storc For Sale by Owner, 
Large Dance Hall. Living 
area upstairs. Good traffic 
area, Ig parking lot, only 2 
blocks to Lake Arbutus. 
$350k. Call for details 

715-333-6653 




WANTED TO SUV* 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

Our automobile business Is looking to 
relocate In Laks County. 

Wo need office space with parking for 30 cars. And If 
possible, a garage for automobile maintenance. 

Please Call 
847-540-0020 or 847-541-6840 




Business Property 

For Me 



SARASOTA, FL- . 

51 Unit Franchise Motel. 
Bxc condition; Dank ap- 
proved w/20% dn; gross 
SS30V; S2.2M. 

V/odabiock R/E Co: 
Deborah Thrasher 

941-518-773B 



WISCONSIN- 

For Snle by Owner. 
Last Chancel 20 Unzoncd 
Acres on County Hwy. Ideal 
for building site, 3acs 
woods, 17 gently rolling acs 
for personal enjoyment 
(Horse Ranch), beautiful vu, 
20 mln to Mississippi Bluff & 
Casino boat, 608-672-2459 



WISCONSIN. 
For Sale by Owner. 
Rcstuarant/Loungt or !• 
4 family vacation condo. 
$295k or without He. or 
eqpmt: $235. 
Call M-Sun 7a-IOa 
7 J 5-S84-2694 



WOULD YOU UKE TO HAVE 
YOUR OWN CELLULAR, 
PAGING AND MUSIC BUSI- 
NESS? All Inventory will be 
included, WINDY CITY 

JAM2 is an established co. 
of 4yrs„ located in Round 
Lake Beach. For more infor- 
mation, please contact 
Jimmy or Marl at (847) 740- 
4910. 




Business Property 
For Kent 



ANTIOCH/LAKE VILLA 

AREA, STORAGE BUILD- 
ING, 1900sq.tt., may divide. 
(847) 395-7117, pager (847) 
536-7116, 

FOX LAKE ~ 

NEW 

LAKE VIEW 

OFFICES 

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE 

34 W. GRAND AVE. 

(847)587-1615 

(815)385-7049. 

GURNEE WINDSOR CT. 
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE 
SPACE, BOOsq.ft., 3 offices, 

will divide. Comes w/office 
furniture, copy machine. For 

info, call (847) 548-7992 ask 

for Helen. 

OFFICE FOR RENT In Grays- 
lake, Rt. 83, 600sq.ft., 
$700/mo. + utilities. (847) 

234-1545. 

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT, 

1-room suite available. Near 
Lake County College. Newer 

building. (847) 223-7900. 

WAUCONDA 
" 1st Month Rent FREE" 

Small Office Suites, 200 
300', $250-5450/ mo, ln< 
eludes all utilities. 

Call days & ask for 
j C, David <3> 

I (847)816-3500 





Investment Prope 



TWO UNIT INCOME PROP- 
ERTY on 1-1/4 acres, has 

sewer, Is buildable, owner is 
an R.E. Broker. $132,000. 

(847) 546-8730. 




ABOUT 9 ACRES, less than 
3 miles from downtown Lake 
Geneva. Ponds, running 
creek, partially landscaped. 
(262) 279-5823 evenings. 

ANTIOCH, ILL. REGENCY 

Subdivision, 1,15 acre wood- 
ed lot, $80,000. Please call 

Chris (847) 456-4641, 



FOR SALE 80 Acres, 
Kenosha County, 21 acres 

Prime Development property, 
wooded with pond. Qualified 
buyers call 262-877-8309 
or E_-mail 
markwegner@msn.com 




UBERTYVILLE LOT, EXCEL- 
LENT location, priced to soil, 
(blueprints avail.), $1t0,000. 

(847)816-0316, 



LOOKING FOR A LOT? 1 
acre lot, Spring Grove, $2,000 
down, no Intorost or payments 
for 18 months or will discount 
for cash. Call owner (815) 

678-4228. 

PROPERTY FOR SALE 

5.25 Acres for sale in 

Spring Grove, 

Zoned Agriculture. 

Horses allowed. 

Spring Grove School District. 

Located on Roulo 12 

between Wilmot Road 8i 

Sunset Rood. Beautiful view 

overlooking Conservation 

District and Nippersink 

Creek. $125,000. 

(815)344-0768. 
ROLUNG 8 ACRES with 

pond, surrounded by State 
Preserve. Perked conven- 
tional. Perfect for walkout. 
Wafworth County, Burlington 

Schools. $118,000. (262) 
767-0236. 




DEEDED VACATION PROP- 
ERTY, Red Rex week at 
Christmas Mountain Village, 
Wisconsin Dolls, Wiscon- 
sin. Point system, great trad- 
ing power, 2-bedrooms/6, full 
kitchen, fireplace, central 
heat and air, many amenities 
on site and nearby, 
$12,500/negotiable, (262) 
862-2124 after 5:30pm, 

leave message. 

PANAMA CITY BEACH 

Sandpiper Beacon Beach 
Resort. From $49 (1-2p. Ar- 

rivo Sun/Mon - FREE night, 
4/1/01 • 5/25/01, restrictions). 

Pools, river ride, suites, bar. 

800-488-8828. 

www.sandplperbeacon.com 




LAKE SALEIl 15 + AC 
$39,900 w/boat slip. Nicely 
wooded acreage w/doeded 
access to magnificent mtn 
lake. Minutes to town & golf, 
paved rds.. underground utili- 
ties, excellent financing. 
Great for vacation/retirement. 
Toll free 1-877-505-1871 ext. 
1107. 

OZARK MOUNTAIN COUN- 
TRYI Boat Tablerock Lako. 
Trout In STATE PARK, 
Horses and hiking in wilder- 
ness area, hunt turkey and 
deer on over 1 5,000 acres of 
national forest. Mix of can- 
yons, hardwoods and pas- 
ture. Located 50 miles west 
of Branson on Route 76 at 
County M. Front 20 acres 
with paved hwy frontage, 
$35,000. Back 30 acres 
$37,500. Will consider 10 
acre parcels. (847) 526-2931, 



TENNESSEE 2.7 WOODED 

acres on Cumberland pla- 
teau. $24,900. 847-356-6812. 

TWENTY SEVEN ACRES, 

OLD house (needs lots of 
work), well, 1/4 mile to swim- 
min'hole, fishing, on dirt 
road. Taxes $45/yr. Four 
miles to Gilbert, Arkansas, 

$35,000. (870) 449-6765. 



WISCONSIN 

Northern Marinette County 
60 acres of recreational 
property with a year around 
home or cottage • $1 60,000 
9.5 acres of high wooded 
land • $33,000 

New 2br cottage, well, sep- 
tic, and electric on 3 acres • 

$46,000 

2 acres high woodod lots - 
$12,900 

1.5 acres high wooded lots • 
hardwoods* $15,000 
www.burgessrsalty.com 

# 

'' Bu rgess Realty, 

Pembinc, WI 
(715) 324-5599 or 

(7 15) 324-5949 




WISCONSIN 206 ACRES, 

118 acres rolling farm land, 
61 acres hardwoods, mostly 
oak, 27 acres of swales. Ot- 
tawa Township, Waukesha 

County. (920) 699-2759, 
(715)445-4834. 




CARYWOODRIDGE 2- 

CHOICE LOTS. GREAT BUY. 
USUALLY SELL FOR 
$1095/EA. NOW ONLY 
$1500/BOTH. (815) 

653-3574. 




Real Estate 

Wanted 



VACANT LAND WANTED, 

10 to 200 acros for develop- 
ment (262) 945-2258, 




Recreational 
Vehicles 



1982 24FT. KAYOT PON- 
TOON BOAT, Includes chairs 
and O/B motor, $4,500. (847) 

395-8637. 

1990 36FT. HITCH HIKER 
FIFTH WHEEL, A-1 condi- 
tion, central heat & air, 2 
slide outs, washing ma- 
chine, dryer, $14,000. Thure.- 

Sun, (608) 748-4512. Mon.- 
Wed. (815) 363-9901 alter 
6pm. 

QOINQ CAMPING? TAKE 

ME WITH YOU 28ft. motor- 
home, 1991 Cobra American, 
full basement, microwave, 
TV, tub and shower, air, 
sleeps 8, 17,000 miles, great 

shape, $25,000. (262) 
862-8901. 

HOLIDAY RAMBLEH TRAV- 

EL TRAILER 26FT., all amen- 
ities and many extras. Locat- 
ed on Lake Marie at private 
park. Includes 24x12 wol- 

manlzod dock with screen 
enclosure. Call for more de- 
tails, $8,000. (847) 

356-9452, (847) 838-4963, 




1985 POLARIS AW TRAIL 
BOSS 250. A now 3x5 Mas- 
torcraft trailer, $1,400. (847) 
566-4729. 

SNOWMOBILE 1997 SKI- 
OOO MACH 1, Dlno port 
pipes, knitted head, clutch 

kit, 240 studs, $3,100. (847) 
293-3122. 




1971 HUSTLER BOAT and 

trailer, BOhp. Johnson motor, 

$900/bost. (262) 279-9684. 

1983 CHRISCRAFT CATAU- 
NA 281, 29', Twin 230hp, in- 

board, new camper top, 
newer upholstery, sleeps 6, 

standup head, shower, 
stove, ACDC fridge, pressure 
water system, stereo, VHF, 
Dopthfindor, shore power, 

VGC, $18,000. (847) 
587-7424. 

1993 24' LUND POINTOON, 

$4,500. Good condition, 
seats need to be rouphol- 
stered. (847) 395-4557. 

1997 ARCTIC CAT TIGER 
SHARK 3-person waverunner 
& 1997 Shoreland'r trailer, 
$3,700/best. Call (847) 
543-1 885 ask for Scooby, 

BAYUNER BOAT 1991 18' 

open bow, 90hp O/B, many 
extras, $5000/bost. (847) 

336-2208 

BOAT SUPS AVAILABLE 

ON FOX LAKE w/electric lifts, 
For Info, call (847) 772-2325 
days, (847) 358-8038 after 
7pm. 



CEDAR PIER POSTS 

Round Posts 8'*20\ Free Del. 
Call: Long Lake Lumber 

847-546-1223 



NEWSPAPERS 




Custom Boat Uttering 
Discount Prices 

Call 847-587-7258 
FISHING BOAT 14FT. fibof. 

glass, w/trallor, 30hp Evin- 
rude, all electronics includ- 
ed. Trolling motor. 
$1,300/best. Call after 

5:30pm. (847) 497-3004. 

HAVE 2 BOATS & WIFE, 
ONE MUST GOf 1074 15ft. 

Urson Run-About w/ trailer, 
75hp. Johnson Outboard. 
New steering, runs great, 
good first boat, $1,500. (847) 
973-1552, 

PADDLE BOAT, WITH cano- 
py, seats 4, $1,200. (847) 
265-9803. 

SELL OUT SALE Small Pro- 
pellers, ski vests, accessories. 

(815)385-4729. 

TROLLING MOTOR FOR 

SALE Minn-Kota (purchased 
In 2000), 050 power drive 
pedal operated, very low 
hears. Seller in Twin Lakes, 

Wisconsin. $350, (262) 
877-3348. 




CYCLE CROSS BIKE Trek 

Cross Frame. Shimano 105 
package. Asking $900/obo. 

847-203-9730. 

GOLF CLUBS POWERBILT 
golf clubs 3-PW, 1-3-5 
woods, steel stiff shafts, 
stand-up bag. All for $225. 

(262) 694-6442. 




1946 LUSCHOMBE BA, 

65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and files 
great. $16,500. ' (414) 

248-8702. 



Cars for Sale 




BMW 1996 31BTI, 74K 
miles, 5-sp., $12,900. (815) 
378-4337. 

BUY POUCE IMPOUNDS 

From $5001 
For listings call 

(800)319-3323x2292. 

WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS. 

Running or not. From $50- 
$3,000. Paying all the mon- 
ey, let's talk. Call anytime 

(847) 358-1 643. 

CARS FROM $500 Police Im- 
pounds: Honda's, Toyotas, 
Chevy's & Jeeps. Call now 1- 

800-892-6999 ext. 9895. 

CHEVROLET 1993 BERET- 

TA GT, 6-cyl. auto., air, 
power windows and locks, 
58K miles, excellent condi- 
tion, $4,999. (262) 553-1873. 

Chevrolet Corsica 1996, 
Windows, locks, V6. New 
shocks, struts, control arms, 
soppentlne belt. Just tuned 
upl Needs Intake gasket 
and possible associated en- 
gine work. If you have some 
mechanical skills, here's the 
bargain you've been looking 

fori 129.000 miles. $2000. 
(414)762*5366. 

CHEVY 1956 & 1857 BEL- 
AIR, clean Inside and out, 
runs good. 1981 Cadillac 
runs good, dean inside and 
out. Best offer. (773) 
392-3944. 



CHEVY 1993 V24 Cavalier, 
$1500. CHEVY 1982 Z28 
Camaro, 5spd, $1,300, 
CHEVY 1986 Nova, $850. 
CHEVY 1983 Suburban 4x4, 
$950. PLYMOUTH 1991 Ac- 
claim, $1,200. VW 1966 Bee- 
tle Custom, $2,000. (847) 731- 
0699 or 847-804-3509, 



DAEWOO 2000 NUBIRA, 

5/mo. old, returning lo 
school. MUST SELL! 

$14,000, (847) 623-2924 

evenings. 

VOLKSWAGON GOLF 1986, 

$900/best (847) 546-3022. 




Cars for Sale 



* 



**>> 



FORD 1985 CROWN VIC, 

good condition, has trailer 
hitch, new tiros, battery and 

brakes, $900/bost. (847) 
587-4058. 

FORD 1988 ESCORT, 2-door,. 

auto,, air, low miles. 
Looks/runs great. $1,500. 

(847)361-4970. 

■ 

FORD 1990 PROBE GL, 

auto., air, sunroof, GT ground 
effects package, low miles,. 

$3,000.(847)361-4970. 
HONDA 1989 ACCORD DO. 

Excellent! Auto., 4-dr„ power 
everything, CD/AM-FM ster- 
eo, moonroof, Florida car, No 
rust, 185,000 hwy, ml., 

$2,995. (847) 356-0781. 

HONDA 1998 CMC LX, red,' 
27,000 ml., auto., A/C, cas- 
sette, $12,500. (847) 
249-7385. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 
24 HOURS 

If you nood to place an ai In 
Classified, call us at 

(647)223-81610x1101 

and leave a message. 

Wo win get back to you by 

the next business day. Or 

you can fax our 24-hour fax 

lino at (847) 223-2691. 

MINI BUS FOR SALE 1900 
Ford Star Supreme 8cy1„ 350 
engine, 25 passenger, A/C, 
and extras, • (847) 395-^7220 ■ 
6pnv8pm. ? : ' 



PLYMOUTH 1999 PROWL- 
ER, 7,000 milos, loaded, exrfr* 
celJent condition. $41 ,000. »,* * 



*r v > 



-i! 



(608) 365-0732 



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PONTIAC *95 GRAND PRl)U 

SE. 4dr, sedan. V6, auto^f 
88K ml. Welt malnL Ven/i 
good cond. $6,850 B4J-$ 

548-5430 ' m | . 

— — H 11 J 

SAAB 1995 9000 CSE. V £*;'* 

spd, fthr. int., sunroof, CD, .. *: 

60k, $1 4.000/best, k *. - 

(847)448-3741 ' J **' * 



AUTO AUCTION 

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

SALVATION ARMY 

Every Saturday, 9am. 
Over 150 cars, boats, camp- 
ers & motorcycles to be 
sold weekly 
to the highest bidder 
at no reserve. 
. Opening bid $100. 
(847)8024100 



SUBMIT YOUR LAKELAND 

CLASSIFIED ADS ON THE 

INTERNET! 

visit http'7/www.lp news.com/ 
to place your ads conven- 
iently. Ads appear on the In- 
ternet, In all Lakeland Pa- 
pers... The Great Lakes Bul- 
letin and The Market Journal 

for only $20.50 for 4 lines 
(approximately 16 words), 

then ,60e each additional 
lino. 




Vans 



AEROSTAR VAN 1980 , 

white some rust, great for 
construction, runs good, only 

$800/besl (847)587-8675. 



CHEVY 1987 CONVERSION 
VAN with TV and VCR, 77K 

miles, new tires and brakes, 
original owner, mint, $4,500. 

(815) 861-8890. 



CHEVY 1995 ASTRO VAN, 

Watdoch Conversion pack- 
age, excellent condition, 
49K miles, $9,500. v Days 
(847) 688-3456 x241,"eves. 

(262) 658-4479. Leave mes- 
sage at both. 



CHRYSLER 1998 TOWN & 

COUNTRY, white w/gray inl, 

3.6L engine, tow package 
w/traller hitch, dual side slid- 
ing doors, deluxe stereo CD, 
front/rear heat & A7C, $7,500. 
(847) 548-7323, 



DODGE 1994 GRAND CARA- 
VAN LE, 86K, moonroof, CD, 
excellent condition, $8,000. 

(847) 965-5163. 



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VIC, 

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and 

(847) 



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April 13, 2001 



CLASSIFIEDS 



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Lakeland Newspapers I B37 








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Trinity 

Evangelical 
Lutheran Church 

of Lone taUm 

25519 W. Hwy. 134 
Inglcslde, IL 6004 1 (847) 546-2109 

Rev. W. Paul Weeg, Pastor 











HOLY WEEK 

MAUNDY THURSDAY 

7:30pm . 

GOOD FRIDAY 

11:00am AND 7:30pm 

EASTER SUNDAY 

8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 AM 



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A n Invitation from 

CALVARY PRESS YTERIAN CHURCH 

t Lake Road • Round Lake, IL 

(847) 546-4444 

REV. LISLE KAUFFMAN 

Pastor 



Come, Celebrate our Savior's resurrection with 
us! *We invite you to join us tor Easter! 






COME CELEBRATE EASTER! 

7:30 A.M Sunrise Service 

9:30 a.m Early Service 

,11:00 a.m .Traditional Worship 









Maundy Thursday 

Communion & Tenebrae 7:30p.m. 

Easter Worship 6:30, 8:15 & 1 0:45a. m 

Childcaro provided during all services 



Wildwood Presbyterian Church 

one block east of Route 45 on Sears in Wil 

223-0073 1 

www.wildwooid.presbychurch.org 
Kathy and Greg Bostrom, pastors 





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Easter Sunday 




??? 



US: 



As pastor of Community 
Church of Round Lake, 
let me invite you or you 
and your family to share in our worship 
on Easter Sunday morning, 10:00 a.nu • 

Our service is somewhat traditional 
with hymn singing and Scriptural teaching. 
For those with young children (under 
1st grade) we have a staffed nursery. 
We are located one block south of 
the Round Lake Metro Station 
(217 Goodnow). (847)546-1000 

For more info, visit us at 
• www.nsn.org/rikhome/prayer 

Rev. Thomas Curry 






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Over 300.000 Readers Each Week 



MEDIA 







NEWSPAPERS 



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NISSAN 1995 QUEST GXE. 

leather interior, power sun* 
roof, fully loaded, AM/FM 
cassette CD, rear air/heat, 
ex. cond. in/out, new tires & 
brakes. Non-smoker. 

$7.200/best. (708) 296-2250... 




Sport Utility 
Vehicles 



CHEVY 1991 SUBURBAN 
SILVERADO 4x4. 98K miles, 
$9,500. (262) 245-0387, (262) 
740-1964. 



FORD 1998 EXPEDITION 
EDDIE BAUER, fully loadod, 
incl. remote start, red/gold. 

$26,500. (847) 244-6640. 



JEEP 1993 GRAND CHERO- 
KEE LAREDO, 4x4, pwf.', 

drk. grn. Good cond., 
$8.0007best. (847) 223-7189. 



JEEP CHEROKEE SE 1996, 

4x4, 2-door model, In great 
condition, A/C, towing pack- 
age, sliding roof rack, cos- 




Sport Utility 

Vehicles 



TOYOTA 1993 4-RUNNER, 

garage kept, 55K, great con- 
dition, $12,O00/best. 1987 
TOYOTA COROLLA, fair con- 
dition, some rust, 

S1,000/best. (847f 473-0876. 




Trucks/Trailers 



16FT. TRAILER DUALS with 

tailgate & ramps, extra steel 
enforced with sides, heavy 
duty tires with spare, $1,400. 

(815)675-0307. 



1980 MACK VALUE UNER. 

Very good condition. 300hp., 
9-sp., wet kit, A/C, P/S, air 
ride cab, new fifth wheel, etc. 

$15,000/best. 847-991-6356 

after Spm. 

CHEVY 1987 3/4 TON 2WD 

350, unbelievable buy. au- 
tomatic, excellent condition, 
$4,500 with cap and rack. 

(847) 662-6202. 



CHEVY 1993 PICK UP, 6- 

CYUNDER, STICK SHIFT, 

, ■„ ■„i — $3,900. (847) 546-4817, 

sette, low miles. Tune-up and mi) 721-4617. 
new brakes April 1st.. Car - — ' 



runs/looks great. $9,300. Days 
(847). 223-8161, evenings. 
(847) 680-1966. Ask for Bob 
or leave message. 

NISSAN 1994 PATHFINDER, 

4WD, auto., fully, loaded, 

exc. cond., 1 -owner, aaklna 
$6,400. (708) 636-9420 



>tj 



CHEVY 2000 S-10 4x4 ex- 
tended cab, 19.000 highway 
miles, towing package, CD. 
$18,500. CaJI Bryan at (847) 
356-9570 Of (847) '226^4098: ." 

FORD 1988 PICK UP, r 4X4, 
$1,900. (847) 546-4617, 

(847) 721-4617. 




Trucks/Trailers 



CHEVY QMC 1990, 1500 

Series, King Cab, fully load- 
od, P/W, bedliner, towing 
package, black w/red int., 
350 V8, ex cond., $7,900 or 
trade for Conversion Van. 

(847) 497-3256. (847) 988- 
2Q2L 

CHEVY, FORD PICKUP Bod- 
ios. Factory-new, guaranteed 
from $1,300.00 Doors From 
$89.00, Fenders .From 
$50,00. Beds From $600.00 
Bedliners $145.00. BUMP- 
ERS. GRILLS. REPAIR PAN- 
ELS. PAINTS ABRASIVES. 
WINDSHIELDS, RADIA- 
TORS. Delivery. (MARX) 217- 

M4.61B4 

FORD 1985 LT8000 DUMP 
TRUCK CAT 3208 TURBO, 

13-spd., good condition. 
$12.500/best. (847) 

623-6848. Also available 
several gas engines. TA 
Dump Trucks, best offer. 





Truck/Trailers 




Motorcycles 



FORD 1988 BRONCO full 

size 4x4, auto, trans., A/C, 
168K ml., good cond., well 
maintained, $2,000. (847) 

526-7533. 



FORD 1998 F-150 XLT, regu- 
lar cab, 2WD, auto, trans., 
air, power windows, locks, 
mirrors, tilt, .cruise, V6, AOD, 
aluminum wheels, bedliner, 
excellent condition, $9,995. 
(847) 395-7224 after 5:30pm. 



.-• 



• 



QMC 1989 3500 VENTURA 
TRUCK. FRP body, 16ft. 
heavy duty model, V8 350 
gas recent change, power 
steering, A/C, power breaks, 
auto.. 3spd HD. 10.0000 rear 
axle and springs, 35000 front 
axle and air coil, over 
shocks, top rack with lad- 
ders in rear, overhead door, 
hitch, pindle hook, in good 
condition. Asking 
$6.995/best. Ask for Charlie 
or Chris (847) 265-9370. seo 
at 39708 N. Illinois Rt. 59. 
Lake Villa. 

GOOD SOLID WORK 
TRUCK. 1979 GMC 3/4 TON 
4WD. CAP INCLUDED, 
GOOD ENGINE. $1,350. 
(847) 838-5907. 



MUST SELL 1982 GMC Sier- 
ra 3500 Dually, too many ex- 
tras to list, $1 ,500/best. (847) 
526-7760 Troy. 



2000 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
FLTR ROADGUDE 

cobalt blue. 1800 mi., like 
new, 1000 mile service done, 
all receipts & shop manual 
$19,000.00 frm. 847-226- 
6900 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1998 
883 Hugger Sportster. Mint 
condition. 1800 ml. $6,500 
firm. (847) 872-4062500 

HONDA 2001 SHADOW, 
1.100 miles, 4yr. extended 

warranty, lots ofjehrome. 
$6,000. (847) 746-5688. 




YAMAHA 1981 SECA 

750cc, runs great, looks 
good. $1.100/best. (847) 
249-3765 leave message. 




I landman • 



NISSAN 1988 TRUCK 

SHORTBED. good cond., 
runs great, $1,300. (847) 

767-7523. 

Vehicle Identification 

Lettering 

Discount Prices 

Call (847)587-7256 



THE HANDYMAN 

No Job' too small. 
Painting, carpentry 

and repair work. 
Reasonable rates & 

FREE estimates. 

(847) 223-7724. 




*T* 



Housekeeping 




>» 



Motorcycles 



, 






DONT HAVE TIME 

TO CLEAN? 

Call CD. House Cleaning. 

Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly 

cleaning available. 
FREE estimates. . 



HARLEY 1990 SPORTSTER, 

excellent condition, l.-^. k . 

$5,000/best (847) 343-0145.U « Ref. available upon request 

CaJI Christine 

(262)843-2431. 




Landscaping 



D& J LANDSCAPING 
(WE CAN DO IT) 

•Edging Flower Beds 
'Tako Out Weedsjp 

•Trim Trees & Evergreens 

•Build Block Walls 

Around Flower Beds 

•Mulching 

•Small Gardens 

•Power Wash Decks & Stain 

CALL FOR FREE 
ESTIMATES 
Ask for David 

(847)826-9619. 

pager (847) 333-7383. 
20 Years Experience. 

H. BROTHERS 
RESIDENTIAL 

& 

COMMERCIAL 

LANDSCAPING. 

General Lawn Service. 

Seal Coating. 

YOU WILL GET A 
BETTER PRICE 
GUARANTEED. 
(847) 420-2850 
(847)623-5419. . 

S. HERNANDEZ 
LANDSCAPING 

•No Job Too Small 

•Quality Workmanship 

•Mowing 

•Tree Trimming 

■Rower Beds 

•Tree Planting. 

. 'Free Estimates 

' *Fully Insured. 

Silverlo Hernandez 

Round Lake, 111. 

mrm 



V 



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7) 546-4617 or 
(847) 721-4617. 




Remodeling 



DC TILE WE- We install ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile. Parquet, 
and Pergo floors. For free es- 
imates call (847) 395-0777. 
>ager (708) 988-8504, 

JACK'S 

REMODELING 

*Basement Finisrung 

•FamilyroomsA Officerooms 

•Electrical & Plumbing 

•Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-3759. 





TIM'S 
WE DO IT ALL 

Roofing, siding, decks, 

remodeling, painting. 

kitchens/baths & window 

replacements. Insur 

Free Estimates. 

(847) 587-9590, 

cell (847) 910-2567. 






Trees/Plants 



■ 







S AWVELL TREE SERVICE 

Residential. Commercial. 
FREE estimates. 

Fully Insured. 
(847) 566-9372. 







■ 








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St. Peter Church 






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2206 Main Street • Spring Grove • 815-675-2288 

Holy Thursday - Aprill 2 

7:30 p.m. Mass of the Lord's Supper • 8:30 to 10:00 p.m. 
Adoration of Blessed Sacrament in Parish Hall 

Friday -April 13 

1:00 p.m. Liturgical Commemoration Of the Lord's Passion and 
Death with Holy Communion • 7:00 p.m. Stations of the Cross 

Holy Saturday - April 14 

7:30 p.m. Easter Vigil and Mass (This satisfies Easter obligation) 

Easter Sunday Masses - April 15 

7:00 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 1 1 :30 a.m. 









Celebrate Easter! 









TRINITY UNITED 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

658 Grand Ave* Waukcgan, EL 
Rev. Dennis H. Kelly, Pastor 

(847)623-1197 

Maundy Thursday Services 

Thursday, April 12 
Noon & 7:30 pm 

Good Friday Services 

Friday, April 13 
Noon & 7:30 pm 







aster Sunday Services 
Sunday, April 15 
7:30 am & 10:30 am 

Regular Sunday 
Worship 

8:00 am & 9:30 am 






Transfiguration Parish Invites you to; 






Come Home for Easter! 







Hchalubfor) Inltf Week and Faxlrr 










HOLY THURSDAY 

Thursday, April 12tb 

6:30pm - Agape Meal (Pot luck 

dinner) in the Parish Hall 






GOOD FRIDAY 



Friday, April 13th 
12 Noon -Rosary 

„ _. , , . 1:00pm -Guided Meditations 
7:30pm - Mass of the Lonl'sSuppcr m ^ _ MM$ s ^ 

J2f£2 ?k , 3:(%m - StaUons of the Cross 

Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament :,,/ ,, . , , ., 

untU 1 1 :30pra for closing 7:3 °P m " Utu W of * M s 
prayer service 



Passion and Communion 



. 



. 




mw Saturday c . AHiltM 

Saturday April Nth Sunday April 15tb 

10am English and 4pm Polish we have 5:30am - Polish Procession, Mass 
Blessing of Easter Baskets and Foods in the 7:30am - English Mass 

Parish Hall 930am - English Mass 

7:30pm - Easter Vigil 11:30am -English Mass 

Pr. Tom Enrigbt • Pastor • Ft. Bob Agutrrt • Aaxkte tutor 
Traosflgurttlon Catholic (lurch • Route 176 (liberty St) ft Mill Street Wiscoada, 

IL Floae 847-526-2400 - Fas 847-526-2961 
website www.transflMraqcoflda.ori — E-mail; 




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St. Matthew 
Lutheran Church 

24500 N. Old McHenry Rd. 
%«j a&M M Lake Zurich, IL • (847) 438-7709 

• * • ^^» ■• «§ . ^ 

Maundy Thurs. Service with 

Holy Communion 7 p.m. 

Good Friday Service with 

Holy Communion 12 noon 

Tcncbrac Service 7 p.m. 

Easter Morning 

Sunrise Service with 

Holy Communion 6 a.m. 

Fellowship Breakfast 

(In gymnasium) 7 a.m. 

Free Witt Offering 
Festival Service with 

Holy Communion 8:15 & 10:45 a.m. 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

All Are Welcome! 



Good things are happening in Lake Zurich 

St. Peter United Church of Christ. 
47 Church St.. Lake Zurich. Illinois 

(847) 438-6441 

Maundy Thursday April 12, 7:30pm 
Good Friday Cantata April 13,7:30pm 

Free Easter Egg Hunt 
Saturday, April 14, 9am 
Easter Sunday, April 15: 
7 am - Sunrise Service 
8am - Breakfast Buffet 

9am & 10:30am 
Easter Festival Services 





hool Available 
The Rev. Prentice - Leslie, Senior Pastor 
The Rev. Baldwin, Associate Pastor • 










Gurnee Community Church 

4555 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL (847) 336-2392 

Pastors: Dr. William Gonda 
Rev. Stuart Merkel 

wff 

April 12 Maundy Thursday 

7:30 pm Worship Service with Communion 

April 13 Good Friday 

9:00 am-7:00 pm Sanctuary Open for Prayer a Mention 
7:00 pm Friday NI|htWor»hlp 

April 15 Easter Sunday 

7:00 am Sunrise Service presented by our 
I Confirmation Class 

9:00 & 1 1:00 am Worship Service 

Sermon: - If We Only Had Known" 

Nurtmry provided tor $11 wor%Np Mrvlatt 






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St. Paul Ev. 
Lutheran Church' 

420 N. Greenwood Dr. 
Round Lake Park 546-4685 



invites you to worship with us at o;« 

any of the Easter services this year 

Palm Sunday April 8, 9:00 am 

^ Maundy Thursday April 12, 7:00 pm g^ 

£*Good Friday, Tcncbrac Service April 13, 7:00 pm «• 

Easter Sunday April IS 

Sunrise Service 7:00 am 

Fellowship Breakfast 7:45am 

Festival Service 9:00 am 



Tl. 



United Methodist Church of antioch 

848 Main st., Antioch, Illinois 60002 

Office (847) 395-1259 
Fax/prayer connection 




^*> 



(847) 395-4238 

REV. GARY L CURL 
^ - • PASTOR 

« ■ w 

THURSDAY. APRIL 12 (MAUNDY THURSDAY) 
Communion Service, 7 p.m. 

Nursery care provided - '•*- 



FRIDAY APRI 




Tenebrae Service and Drama, 7 p.m. 

Nursery care provided 



- «■ 



S UNDAY . APRI 










NDAY) 



Sunrise Service led by Senior High Youth, 7 am. 
Worship, 8:30 & 10:00 am 

Nursery care at each "service. 






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Continental breakfast between the sunrise and 
8:30 services and the 8:30 and 10: a.m. services 





5 c ^ *; ; 4 

JJU WtUed SfaUe&iofd 
CAwuA of, fytay&tafie 

IbxlUd MttAoMst - IbiUtd e/uixcA of. CAxht 

' 54 South Whitney St 
(corner of Park & Whitney Streets) 
Graplike • &47-223-8131 

T i . 

Palm Sunday 

Worship Service 8:15 A 10:30 am 

Maundy Thursday 

Worship Service 7:30 pm 

Good Friday 
Children's Journey to Jerusalem K/*h . . . 10:00-1 1:00 am 

Meditation Service 12-3 pm 

Contemplative & Tcncbrac Service 730 pm 

Easter Sunday 

Sunrise Service 6:30 am 

Breakfast prepared by men of the church. . . . 7:30-10 am 

Worship Services 8:15 & 10:30 am 

NO SUNDAY SCHOOL Child Care 0-3 yr 

PASTORS 
William 0. Owen & Orrcll Ruth 






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Community Bible Church 

GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE 7:00 

The Supper — The Garden 

The Crucifixion 

EASTER SERVICES 
6:00, 9:00 & 11:00 AM 






For more 
information 

call 

(847) 838-0103 




23201 W. Grass Lake Road 

(east of Rt 83 
Antioch, 




■ 






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Bethel Lutheran 

Church 

(Missouri Synod) 

51 10 Grand Ave. 

Gurnee, IL (847) 244-9647 

Rev. Lee Clark 







T eek Schedule 



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JOIN US TO SHARE THE MIRACLE! 

* 

The Federated Church 



1_ . 



of Wauconda 

200 Barrington Rd 
Wauconda IL 60084 



(847) 526-8471 




who beSeves in 






Sunrise Service 

Breakfast 

Traditional Service 
Coffee Fellowship 
Contemporary Service 



7:30 am 
8:15 am 



Resurrection Sunday 

April 15, 2001 
10 a.m. 

i 

Christian Life 
Fellowship 

■ 

Presents 

'Hope Rising" 



I^JSj' 8, The Apostle Peter takes us 
**** through Christ's Trial, down 



the Via Dolorosa, to the 
Cross and out of the Tomb. 
Visual effects, Choir, 
Human videos and stirring 
solos highlight this narra- 
tive of Christ's Passion. 









Maundy Tliursday -April 12th 

7:00 pm 
Good Friday-April 13th 

7:00pm 

Easter Sunday-April 15th 

6,8 & 10:45 am 





r Breakfas 
8 am services 






* . ■ * 

9ieritage 




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aveC 



John 1125 




9:45 am 
10:45 am 
11:15 am 



41625 N. Deep Lake Rd. 

Antioch, IL 60002 

847-395-8572 





Affiliation 

United Methodists andZff 
American Baptists 




ST. MARK LUTHERAN CHURCH 

1822 E. Grand Ave., Lindenhurst 



(847) 356- 

April 12th Maundy Thurs. worship with 

h communion 7 p.m. 

April 13th Good Friday worship 7 p.m. 




April 15th Easter Sunday worship with 

communion 6, 8, & 11:00 a.m. 

Easter Buffet Breakfast 

7:15 a.m. 



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Join us at Heritage Chapel! 

■ 

1 Set apart some time this Holy Week to 

remember love poured out upon a cross and the 

astonishing news of an empty grave! 

Good Friday, April 13 at 7:00 pm 

A quietly dramatic service remembering 
Christ's words from the cross 

Easter Sunday,' April 15 at 9:30 am 

An outdoor celebration in the 
Community Center's new pavilion! 

Both services held at our weekly location 

with nursery provided: 

Lindenhurst Park District Community Center 

2200 E. Grass Lake Rd. 

For more information: call (847) 245-3095 
or visit www.heritagechapel.org 







* 




Saint Sindrexu's Church 

Anjjtican/'LpucopaC 

Laks St. & < 2ark m 5kvt., grays(af<f, IL 

(847)223-2310 

Passion (Palm) Sunday, April 8 

Saturday 5:00pm. Sunday 7:30am. 

Distribution of Palms at alt Masses 

9:30am. SOLEMN MASS 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 

Masses: 7:00pm. 

Maundy Thursday, April 12 . . 

7:00pm. SOLEMN MASS OF THE LORD'S SUPPER 
AOOpm. Vigil at tbt Repository until midnight . 

Good Friday, April 13 

1 2:00 Noon, Stations oi the Cross & Meditation 

7:00pm. SOLEMN LITURGY & MEDITATION 
Veneration of tbt Cross & Hofy Communion 

Confessions Saturday 5pm. or by Appointment 

Easter Eve, Saturday. April 14 

8:00pm. EASTER VIGIL AND SOLEMN MASS 

Easter Day, April 15 ' 

7:30am. Mass (no music) 

- 9:30am. SOLEMN MASS 



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B40 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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